Marilyn Monroe – 49 Years Later, the Death of an Icon

On August 5, 1962, iconic actress Marilyn Monroe was discovered dead in her home from a drug overdose and possible suicide. She was 36 years old. It’s no mystery that the stunning beauty led a troubled life – battles with drug addiction, many failed relationships and marriages, erratic behavior, and plagued by the press. Still, her death was shocking and the country mourned her loss.

Nearly 50 years after her death, Marilyn is probably one of the most remembered and idealized figures in Hollywood History. She summed up her own imperfect life wonderfully in an interview when she stated:

“This life is what you make it. Not matter what, you’re going to mess up sometimes, it’s a universal truth. But the good part is you get to decide how you’re going to mess it up. Girls will be your friends – they’ll act like it anyway. But just remember, some come, some go. The ones that stay with you through everything – they’re your true best friends. Don’t let go of them. Also remember, sisters make the best friends in the world. As for lovers, well, they’ll come and go too. And babe, I hate to say it, most of them – actually pretty much all of them are going to break your heart, but you can’t give up becuase if you give up, you’ll never find your soul mate. You’ll never find that half who makes you whole and that goes for everything. Just because you fail once, doesn’t mean you’re gonna fail at everything. Keep trying, hold on, and always, always, always believe in yourself, because if you don’t, then who will, sweetie? So keep your head high, keep your chin up, and most importantly, keep smiling, because life’s a beautiful thing and there’s so much to smile about.”

In spite of her flaws and the tragedy of her life, we all remember you Marilyn. The Smithsonian has a wonderful article about how the country memorializes the woman and in the legend in its article: “Remembering Marilyn Monroe.”

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About Jennifer Carey

My name is Jennifer Carey and I am a student and educator of the human condition. I have long studied history, trained in archaeology, and found a passion in the field of education. As a long-time lover of technology (my father bought our family our first Apple IIe when I was three), I love technology and what it can bring to the classroom. I have taught at various Universities for many years as well as educating gifted teenagers through the Johns Hopkins program, the Center for Talented Youth. I am currently the Director of Educational Technology at the Ransom Everglades School (a secular independent school) in Miami, Fl. I also have a few educational podcasts on iTunes from my days teaching at TCU: The Ancient City of Rome, Classical Archaeology (2008), Classical Archaeology (2009), Introduction to Classical Myth, and Ancient Eats. They’re enhanced (so you get the PowerPoints along with the vocal), but please excuse the poor audio editing. Feel free to Email Me or follow me on twitter.
This entry was posted in History, Popular Culture, United States History, Women's History and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Marilyn Monroe – 49 Years Later, the Death of an Icon

  1. Jen,

    I really enjoyed reading this post. I did read the link to the Smithsonian article and it was good, save that I was a bit annoyed with a comment from the curator: ““Monroe was often spotted wearing this ladylike accoutrement.” I wonder what Monre would have thought about “ladylike?”

    • Jennifer Lockett says:

      Yes… ladylike… interesting.

      Did you notice the picture? I chose it because I always felt that photograph embodied her whole spirit – the beauty, sadness, longing, quiet desperation, and enduring hope.

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