Mapping of Bonobo Chimpanzee Genetic Code Reveals More About (Us) Humans

Bonobos at the Cincinnati Zoo (courtesy of Wikipedia)

Scientists have recently mapped and published the genetic code of the Bonobo Chimpanzee (Pan paniscus); our closely related primate cousins. Bonobo Chimps, sometimes called pygmy or gracile chimpanzees, share 98.7% of their DNA with human beings (on par with the common chimpanzee, Pan troglodytesThe two species of chimpanzee share more than 99% of their genetic code, but have clearly distinct social constructions and inherent behaviors.

Common chimpanzees are characterized by not only their intelligence, but their often violent (sometimes inexplicably so) behavior. Whereas their primate “siblings,” Bonobos, are inherently peaceful, egalitarian, and matriarchal (the only group of great apes with a female-focal social construct).

Scientists hope that these new genetic revelations will help us to understand concepts of ‘inherently human’ behavior – specifically concepts of empathy, cooperation, and peaceful negotiation (all behaviors human beings can and do express).

“If you look at bonobos, chimpanzees and humans, what you can see is that there are some specific characteristics that we share with both of them.”

Scientists hope to study the genetic distinctions to help understand what is inherent versus learned social behavior that we may have genetically inherited from our distant, primate ancestors. To learn more about this research, see the articles: “‘Hippie Chimp’ DNA may shed light on our Dark Side” at MSNBC and Bonobo’s Genetic Code Laid Bare at the BBC.

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About Jennifer Carey

My name is Jennifer Carey and I am a student and educator of the human condition. I have long studied history, trained in archaeology, and found a passion in the field of education. As a long-time lover of technology (my father bought our family our first Apple IIe when I was three), I love technology and what it can bring to the classroom. I have taught at various Universities for many years as well as educating gifted teenagers through the Johns Hopkins program, the Center for Talented Youth. I am currently the Director of Educational Technology at the Ransom Everglades School (a secular independent school) in Miami, Fl. I also have a few educational podcasts on iTunes from my days teaching at TCU: The Ancient City of Rome, Classical Archaeology (2008), Classical Archaeology (2009), Introduction to Classical Myth, and Ancient Eats. They’re enhanced (so you get the PowerPoints along with the vocal), but please excuse the poor audio editing. Feel free to Email Me or follow me on twitter.
This entry was posted in Anthropology, Human Evolution, Physical Anthropology, Primatology and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Mapping of Bonobo Chimpanzee Genetic Code Reveals More About (Us) Humans

  1. Jim Wheeler says:

    Very good post, Jen, and the MSNBC article was most interesting. This information correlates very well with the conclusions of E. O. Wilson in his last book, i.e. that a great deal of animal behavior, humans included, is the result of the co-evolution of culture and brain. The bonobo/chimp split is an excellent example of just that.

    Hmm. I wonder if homo sapiens is in the process of splitting into Democrat and Republican sub-species, and if so, which might have more Neanderthal genes? I think I know. :roll:

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