Category Archives: Anthropology

Creative Commons and Cultural Heritage

Jennifer Carey:

These are some great thoughts about presenting cultural documents and artifacts to the public and how they should be licensed. Interesting ethical questions and dialogue.

Originally posted on Archaeology, Museums & Outreach:

Java PrintingI am very pleased to present a post and resource links on Creative Commons by my colleague Jason Baird Jackson.  More and more cultural heritage professionals and students are faced with questions about how to best present original documents for public access and the proper citation and use of internet files.  Jason provides a solid introduction and valuable links to Creative Commons licenses that are relevant today and will be increasingly important in the immediate future.

Creative Commons and Cultural Heritage

by Jason Baird Jackson

Do public archaeologists, heritage professionals, museum practitioners, and graduate students need to know about the Creative Commons? I think so. Robert Connolly does so as well, which is why he thought to ask me to contribute a short note to his blog. After you have learned a bit about it, I hope that you too will see the relevance of the tools provided by the…

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The Best Museums on Flickr

A photographer friend of mine, Christian Santiago, recently redirected me to Flickr. I remember the Flickr of a few years ago, largely used as a repository for vacation photos. Wow has Flickr grown up! As a Social Studies teacher, I am always on the look out for high quality images that are Creative Commons Licensed. Now, museums around the world are using Flickr as a means to showcase and share their collections. What makes these Flickr streams especially valuable is that they use them to highlight their archived material.

Here is a short list of museums on Flickr:

Boys picking up garbage, courtesy of the Library of Congress

Boys picking up garbage, courtesy of the Library of Congress

The Library of Congress - An amazing repository of images from American history, some of the highlights include Dorothea Lange, the history of baseball, and photojournalist collections about child labor.

The Field Museum Library - More than 1,600 images of both the collection of Field Museum and the history of the museum itself.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Not only do they have some great images from their collection, but they include photos of their social events including the Met Gala.

The British Library - More than a million images from their collection  covering topics like fashion, cartography, warfare, botany, and more.

The British Museum - While they have only few images from their collection, they post pictures and videos from their live events around the world, such as Nelson Mandela Day and Day of the Dead Altar.

Prairie Dawn 1971 Muppets, Courtesy of the Smithsonian Museum

Prairie Dawn 1971 Muppets, Courtesy of the Smithsonian Museum

Guggenheim Museum - This is a great way to look at installation exhibits!

National Museum of American History at the Smithsonian - Not only do they post images from their collection, but pictures of the museums’s history, scanning images for their x 3D collection, and more.

National Media Museum - This English museum focuses on photography, video, memes, and more.

The Smithsonian Institution - A great highlight of material at all of the Smithsonian Institutions.

Smithsonian Museum of Natural History - Another amazing collection of natural history artifacts.

Los Angeles County Museum of Modern Art - A nice overview of the collection and exhibits at LACMA.

This is only a small collection, but Fickr is an excellent resource for educators looking for unique, high quality images to incorporate into lessons or to teach students about licensing online content.

Spurious Correlations – Visual Graphs Demonstrating no relationship whatsoever!

What does the number of people who drowned in pools have to do with the number of films featuring Nicholas Cage?

Or World-Wide non commercial Space Launches have to do with the number of sociological doctorates awarded in the United States?

 

Absolutely nothing. They are spurious correlation, “mathematical relationship in which two events or variables have no direct causal connection.”

Check out the website Spurious Correlations for simple graphs that highlight how easy it is to confuse a correlative relationship with a causative one. The site is managed and maintained by Tyler Vigen, a law student at Harvard. An excellent visual resource for teachers of statistics, economics, social studies, civics, science, and more.  

 

Smarthistory: Khan Academy for Social Studies

Great Mosque at Damascus by G. Lewis, courtesy of Smarthistory & Flickr

Great Mosque at Damascus by G. Lewis, courtesy of Smarthistory & Flickr

Khan Academy is popular in math for its brief lectures and interactive modules. However, you can also use it in the Social Studies. Check out Smarthistory, a free multimedia platform for student and teacher of history, archaeology, museum curation, and art history.

It includes an interactive timeline, in-depth yet easy to understand articles, vibrant images, and videos about topics throughout history and around the globe. Check out “Teach with Smarthistory” for ideas on how to incorporate it into your classroom. If you are a historian, archaeologist, museum curator, or otherwise involved in the social science consider contributing an article or multimedia content. Additionally, Smarthistory contributes videos to Google Art Project.

3D Printing the Smithsonian

If you’ve been debating about whether or not to get a 3D printer for your school, the Smithsonian Institution has given you another argument in favor of making that purchase. If you’re familiar with the Smithsonian’s X 3D program hosts a repository of 3D scanned items from the Smithsonian’s collection! These high definition scans are not your traditional 3D virtual objects – I promise they feel like you’re view ing it in real life! You can rotate and view objects in 3 Dimensions for free!

Now, the Smithsonian has begun to place objects from the x 3D program into a digital catalogue that will allow you to make a 3D model using a relatively inexpensive 3D printer. The most recent addition the Lincoln Life Mask.

3D Printer, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

3D Printer, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

In a recent article, Secretary of the Smithsonian G. Wayne Clough highlights the boon this provides for both scholars and educators. Check out his article, “How Will 3D Printing Change the Smithsonian?

Wicked Children Beware of Krampus!

Krampuskarten, courtesy of Wikimedia

Krampuskarten, courtesy of Wikimedia

While American children fear a stocking full of coal, German children learn to behave to avoid being snatched and eaten by Krampus! Featured on German “Krampus Cards,” Krampuskarten, he frightens young children into behaving during the Yule season.

To learn more about this frightening consort of Saint Nicholas, check out the article on the Smithsonian or the Wikipedia Article!

Top 10 Archaeological Discoveries of 2013

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

This blog has its roots in archaeology. After all, it is named “Indiana Jen” after my hero, Indiana Jones. As such, I would like to highlight the Top 10 Archaeological Discoveries of 2013 as posted by Archaeology Magazine. The list includes (in no particular order):

Be sure to visit the Top 10 Discoveries of 2013 to learn all about these sites as well as others. And subscribe to the magazine to support many worthy historical and archaeological investigations!