Category Archives: Art History

Smarthistory: Khan Academy for Social Studies

Great Mosque at Damascus by G. Lewis, courtesy of Smarthistory & Flickr

Great Mosque at Damascus by G. Lewis, courtesy of Smarthistory & Flickr

Khan Academy is popular in math for its brief lectures and interactive modules. However, you can also use it in the Social Studies. Check out Smarthistory, a free multimedia platform for student and teacher of history, archaeology, museum curation, and art history.

It includes an interactive timeline, in-depth yet easy to understand articles, vibrant images, and videos about topics throughout history and around the globe. Check out “Teach with Smarthistory” for ideas on how to incorporate it into your classroom. If you are a historian, archaeologist, museum curator, or otherwise involved in the social science consider contributing an article or multimedia content. Additionally, Smarthistory contributes videos to Google Art Project.

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Cultural geography, online photos, and the Field Museum of Natural History

Originally posted on History Tech:

I consider myself a fan of museums. Maybe more than a fan. There’s not much that can beat a good museum. I can easily spend hours browsing displays, talking with docents, and learning tons.

And there aren’t many museums that can get the better of me. The Smithsonian. National Air and Space. World War One Museum. But there’s only one Field Museum. It’s huge – some 24 million objects. I’ve never made it through the entire thing. But still so cool.

So when I found out that the Field Museum is posting some of its photos online, I was pumped. The hundreds of photos are perfect for geography and cultural geography teachers.

I especially like those from the 1893 World’s Fair. But you can find historical images from a wide variety of places and times.

View original 45 more words

Google Street View Lets Users Become Virtual Timer Travelers

“A lot can change in seven years: buildings rise and landscapes change. Whether you’re standing near the ocean in Japan or in the middle of Times Square, your view will likely be quite different in less than a decade.

That’s the premise behind Google Maps’ newest time-lapse tool, launched today. Since it was released in 2007, Google Street View has allowed users to explore a given area from the perspective of walking along a sidewalk, but with the new tool, they’ll actually be able to see how the street and its surroundings have changed…”

Read Further at: Google Street View Lets Users Become Virtual Timer Travelers.

Getty Museum Adds Another 77,000 Images to its Open Content Archive – Open Culture

Open Culture has announced that the Getty Museum has published an additional 77,000 images to its Open Content Archive! The Getty Museum’s Open Content Archive is a

Digital image courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program

Bust of the Emperor Commodus. Digital image courtesy of the Getty’s Open Content Program

repository of images that the museum has placed in the Public Domain.

More than 87,000 high resolution images are now available via the Getty’s Open Content Archive. To learn more about this project and other resources available to the public, see the article by Open Content Archive:

Getty Museum Adds Another 77,000 Images to its Open Content Archive – Open Culture.

Moving Past a 1992 Model for Community Engagement

morton-museumFlowing from last week’s post, I thought a good bit about engagement and the questions posed by Jordan and Allison in their reading journals for my Applied Archaeology and Museums class.  They asked about what if the public does not respond to a museum’s attempts at engagement.  I had a bit of an “aha” moment in my response when listening to a MOOC lecture…

Moving Past a 1992 Model for Community Engagement.

3D Printing the Smithsonian

If you’ve been debating about whether or not to get a 3D printer for your school, the Smithsonian Institution has given you another argument in favor of making that purchase. If you’re familiar with the Smithsonian’s X 3D program hosts a repository of 3D scanned items from the Smithsonian’s collection! These high definition scans are not your traditional 3D virtual objects – I promise they feel like you’re view ing it in real life! You can rotate and view objects in 3 Dimensions for free!

Now, the Smithsonian has begun to place objects from the x 3D program into a digital catalogue that will allow you to make a 3D model using a relatively inexpensive 3D printer. The most recent addition the Lincoln Life Mask.

3D Printer, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

3D Printer, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

In a recent article, Secretary of the Smithsonian G. Wayne Clough highlights the boon this provides for both scholars and educators. Check out his article, “How Will 3D Printing Change the Smithsonian?

Art/Write Connecting the Common Core with Art History

University of Arizona Mascot, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

University of Arizona Mascot, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Many thanks to my friend and colleague Daniel Schneider for bringing this project to my attention. The Art/Write project out of the University of Arizona’s Museum of Art helps high school students to examine and write about art critically. Additionally, the projects highlighted there meet Common Core standards for writing.

“Writing requires careful observation, critical thinking, analysis of ideas and events, and of course creative thinking. When engaged with a work of art, students must also utilize the skills of sustained observation, imagination and interpretation. This web resource provides looking and writing activities that allow students to develop strong looking skills that in turn foster effective writing.” – Quote from Art/Write

If you teach art or are looking for ways to liven up your writing curriculum in conjunction with the common core, be sure to check out Art/Write.