Category Archives: Ancient Rome

Free Technology for Teachers: Explore the World with the Google Cultural Institute

This is reblogged from my post on Free Technology for Teachers

I am a big fan of the Google Cultural Institute; it’s an amazing repository of Artistic Masterpieces, Wonders of the Natural World, Historical Artifacts, and more. By using it as a repository of digital materials, it’s an easy way to access cultural content from around the world in my classroom. I can pull up a high definition image of Van Gogh’s Starry Night and use its powerful zoom features so that students can see the impasto brush strokes. We can explore the Street Art of Sao Paulo with a Google Street View for a unit on modern art or the Ruins at Angkor Wat

Free Technology for Teachers: Explore the World with the Google Cultural Institute.


Smarthistory: Khan Academy for Social Studies

Great Mosque at Damascus by G. Lewis, courtesy of Smarthistory & Flickr

Great Mosque at Damascus by G. Lewis, courtesy of Smarthistory & Flickr

Khan Academy is popular in math for its brief lectures and interactive modules. However, you can also use it in the Social Studies. Check out Smarthistory, a free multimedia platform for student and teacher of history, archaeology, museum curation, and art history.

It includes an interactive timeline, in-depth yet easy to understand articles, vibrant images, and videos about topics throughout history and around the globe. Check out “Teach with Smarthistory” for ideas on how to incorporate it into your classroom. If you are a historian, archaeologist, museum curator, or otherwise involved in the social science consider contributing an article or multimedia content. Additionally, Smarthistory contributes videos to Google Art Project.

Digital Roman Archaeology

The famous Serapium at Hadrian's Villa, Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

The famous Serapium at Hadrian’s Villa, Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

My friend and former Professor Bernie Frischer, Ph.D. has just formally launched his Digital Archaeology Project of Hadrian’s Villa. The Roman Emperor Hadrian built his luxury Villa at Tivoli during the 2nd century CE.

The Digital Hadrian’s Villa allows visitors to examine sections of site via plans, images, 360° panoramic views, as well as 3D walkthroughs. It also includes videos and interviews with prominent scholars. This is an amazing, and free, resource for scholars and laypersons interested in Roman history and archaeology!

The Vatican & Bodlein Libraries Go Public & Digital

Epistle of St. Jerome, Gutenberg Bible. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Epistle of St. Jerome, Gutenberg Bible. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

The Vatican and Bodlein Libraries, in conjunction with a grant from the Polonsky Foundation, have gone digital. Now instead of booking a reservation with the librarians and hopping on a plane to Italy or England, patrons can simply log on to the website in order to browse and view thousands of digitized manuscripts including a copy of the Gutenberg Bible and medieval copies of the Talmud.

To learn more about the overall process and upcoming releases, be sure to follow their blog and read their “about this project” page.

Tufts Releases the Perseus Catalogue

Screen Shot 2013-06-18 at 10.38.19 AMTufts, publisher of the Perseus Project, announces the launch of the Perseus Catalogue:

The Perseus Digital Library is pleased to announce the 1.0 Release of the Perseus Catalog.

The Perseus Catalog is an attempt to provide systematic catalog access to at least one online edition of every major Greek and Latin author (both surviving and fragmentary) from antiquity to 600 CE. Still a work in progress, the catalog currently includes 3,679 individual works (2,522 Greek and 1,247 Latin), with over 11,000 links to online versions of these works (6,419 in Google Books, 5,098 to the Internet Archive, 593 to the Hathi Trust). The Perseus interface now includes links to the Perseus Catalog from the main navigation bar, and also from within the majority of texts in the Greco-Roman collection.

The release allows broader access to Greek and Latin texts in the original language as well as in translation. This is an excellent resource and tool for educators and students in ancient history, Classics, Latin, and Greek.

Explore Life & Death of Pompeii & Herculaneum on your iOS Device Courtesy of the British Museum

© British Museum

© British Museum

The British Museum, in conjunction with its exhibit on Pompeii and Herculaneum, has released an iOS App for the iPhone  ($2.99) and the iPad ($5.99). The application allows users to explores the cities via interactive maps, view objects in high resolution and contextual detail, an in depth timeline, and the aftermath of the eruption (including the city’s later discovery and excavation). The application draws from archaeological discoveries, the remains at the cite, historical sources (specifically the account of Pliny the Younger).

Right now, the application is limited to iOS devices but an Android version is planned to be released in May 2013.

For more information on the exhibit and its resources, be sure to check out the British Museum’s online exhibition website.

Explore the World at your Desk with the Google World Wonders Project

Screen Shot 2013-03-20 at 11.27.34 AMIf you are familiar with google maps and google earth, then the next venue for your is the Google World Wonders Project. The project covers six continents (including Antarctica)  and focuses on natural as well as manmade wonders. You can walk through the ruins of Pompeii, swim at the Great Barrier Reef, stand in the middle of Stonehenge, fly through the Grand Canyon, and more.

The Education provides lesson plan ideas for teachers of K-12 students. It’s a great way to incorporate these sites in your social studies and science curriculum.