Category Archives: Ancient History

Rome 320 AD – Interactive App

My good friend and former Professor, Bernie Frischer, Ph.D., just announced a game that resulted from his collaboration: Rome 320AD. You can see Bernie giving a brief overview of 4th century Rome in this Kahn Academy Video.

The app follows the lives of four Romans as they travel through the city on a summer day in 320 CE. You can explore 3D, interactive models of the city in high resolution and detail.

The app is currently available in the Mac App Store ($5.99) and the Chrome Web Store ($6.99). iPad and Android Apps are in the making!

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Explore the Pyramids on Google Maps

Google Maps now offers street views of the monuments of Egypt, including panoramas and street view access of the Pyramids.

This an addition to Google’s “Treks,” which includes streetview access of the world’s natural and man-made wonders, including Mt. Everest, the Grand Canyon,  the Eiffel Tower, and more.

 

Smarthistory: Khan Academy for Social Studies

Great Mosque at Damascus by G. Lewis, courtesy of Smarthistory & Flickr

Great Mosque at Damascus by G. Lewis, courtesy of Smarthistory & Flickr

Khan Academy is popular in math for its brief lectures and interactive modules. However, you can also use it in the Social Studies. Check out Smarthistory, a free multimedia platform for student and teacher of history, archaeology, museum curation, and art history.

It includes an interactive timeline, in-depth yet easy to understand articles, vibrant images, and videos about topics throughout history and around the globe. Check out “Teach with Smarthistory” for ideas on how to incorporate it into your classroom. If you are a historian, archaeologist, museum curator, or otherwise involved in the social science consider contributing an article or multimedia content. Additionally, Smarthistory contributes videos to Google Art Project.

Digital Dead Sea Scrolls Upgraded & Expanded

A portion of the Isaiah Scroll, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

A portion of the Isaiah Scroll, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

The Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library. The upgraded version provides 10,000 additional high resolution images as well as more supplementary texts to allow users to understand the material in context.

The new website also provides better search features, better explanations, additional translations in German and Russian, and more. The website continues to get updates and will become more robust as it progresses. If you would like to check it out, be sure to visit the Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library. To learn more about the new features, check out the Israel Antiquities Press Release.

Online Exhibit: Exploring the Early Americas, Library of Congress

The Dresden Codex, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

The Dresden Codex, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

The Library of Congress is an amazing repository of cultural items relevant to the Americas. In their online and interactive exhibit, “Exploring the Early Americas,” the Library of Congress highlights important archaeological and historical discoveries of pre-Columbian and post-contact indigenous America. Some of the highlights of the online exhibit include the Dresden Codex and the detailed records of the excavation of the Aztec Sunstone. In the interactive exhibit, explore how to read Pre-Columbian artifacts or explore some of the earliest maps of the American continent.

The exhibit allows you to explore the myriad of cultures and peoples throughout the Americas well before European contact as well as the clash of civilizations that ensued with the arrival of Spanish explorers.

Check out the exhibit in its entirety here.

Digital Roman Archaeology

The famous Serapium at Hadrian's Villa, Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

The famous Serapium at Hadrian’s Villa, Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

My friend and former Professor Bernie Frischer, Ph.D. has just formally launched his Digital Archaeology Project of Hadrian’s Villa. The Roman Emperor Hadrian built his luxury Villa at Tivoli during the 2nd century CE.

The Digital Hadrian’s Villa allows visitors to examine sections of site via plans, images, 360° panoramic views, as well as 3D walkthroughs. It also includes videos and interviews with prominent scholars. This is an amazing, and free, resource for scholars and laypersons interested in Roman history and archaeology!

The Vatican & Bodlein Libraries Go Public & Digital

Epistle of St. Jerome, Gutenberg Bible. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Epistle of St. Jerome, Gutenberg Bible. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

The Vatican and Bodlein Libraries, in conjunction with a grant from the Polonsky Foundation, have gone digital. Now instead of booking a reservation with the librarians and hopping on a plane to Italy or England, patrons can simply log on to the website in order to browse and view thousands of digitized manuscripts including a copy of the Gutenberg Bible and medieval copies of the Talmud.

To learn more about the overall process and upcoming releases, be sure to follow their blog and read their “about this project” page.