Terms of Service Cheat Sheet for Parents & Teachers

This is reblogged from my post on Edudemic

If you have email, iTunes, Facebook, or any other online account, then you are familiar with Terms of Service; you know, those excessively long, confusing legal documents that we all click “accept” on so that we can download the latest episode of Modern Family. These documents are confusing, and very few of us have the time or knowledge necessary to process 56 pages of legalese (yes, the iTunes Terms of Service is 56 pages!). Fortunately, there are several movements out there to encourage technology institutions to present easier to understand and more transparent Terms of Service and Privacy Guidelines; in fact, Microsoft and Google have recently revamped their TOS agreements. In the meantime, here is a brief “cheat sheet” to help parents and teachers to assess the safety of online tools. It will also help to clarify what happens when your children engage and share online.

Keep an Eye on Age Limits!

It’s easy to want to dismiss age restrictions for online services. After all, with just a little creative math your child can use some great resources like email or Skype to communicate with family far away or even enjoy videos from YouTube. However, an age restriction may be a sign that this is a tool to examine more closely. If you find it of value to your child, then you might want to create an account in your own name and with credentials that you can use together. This could open up a myriad of opportunities to help guide your child through appropriate usage.

acceptThere are two age restrictions that frequently appear with online resources: age 18 and 13. If a company or organization requires that an individual be 18 years old to use their services, this is often a sign that they require their users to enter into legally binding contracts (such as financial agreements for purchases such as with airlines). Additionally, it may have adult content (nudity, violence, tobacco and/or alcohol use, language, etc). It is important to note that an 18 year old age restriction is not an automatic black mark. For example, if your child is working on a stock market project for school, then it may be useful for them to have access to a brokerage account in order to get up-to-the-minute stock price updates. This is an appropriate use, but because your child is under 18, it’s also a perfect opportunity for parent-child collaboration on homework; you can create the account and use it with your child!

Because of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), companies are limited on what information they can collect and share for children under the age of 13. This magic number is a prime indicator that data is being collected and shared, so keep in mind that the age 13 requirements for Facebook or Google are not arbitrary! These are organizations that make their income from selling user data to advertisers. Deciding whether the cost is worth the benefits is highly personal; however, this is a great opportunity to discuss online behavior, digital citizenship, and digital footprints before deciding to sign up.

Know what information is being Collected & keep up with Changes!

If a company is collecting data, they should state what information they are gathering – either in the Terms of Service itself or a separate privacy agreement. Google has recently published its privacy policy outlining how it collects and uses data. Still, many companies are not as transparent, so you may need to do some research on an individual businesses.

Many organizations will allow you to sign up for notifications of updates. They will email you every time that there is a change to their privacy policies. This is a great way to stay up to date. In addition to this, you can go back and check privacy policies on a regular basis (every few months). Big companies often make the news when they make drastic changes, especially if they are controversial, so pay attention to these stories and follow up with your own research. You may want to keep a special eye on things like changes to default sharing settings (public vs. private) and how data is being collected.

Don’t Be Afraid to Ask for Help!

Navigating Terms of Service and privacy policies can be confusing and challenging. Never hesitate to enlist others in your quest. Speak to other parents, join discussion groups, read websites dedicated to online privacy (check out “Terms of Service; Didn’t Read”). If your child is in school, seek out the Tech Director with questions. They navigate this world on a regular basis and can help to assuage your concerns or highlight areas where you should be more vigilant. As Director of Educational Technology, I am always eager to form partnerships with parents and colleagues to raise awareness of common security issues and keep them informed about the tools we are using in school.

The Good News: It will get Easier!

There has been a lot of push-back on the tech world to encourage companies to be more proactive and transparent in what type of data they collect and how they use it. Many organizations (such as Google and Microsoft) have responded positively to public pressure. Additionally, federal and state legislation is beginning to address online privacy with a special eye to protecting children. Reaching out to government officials and adding your voice to the cause will help to push this along. Parents are reasonably concerned about their child’s online presence; and with the abundance of online tools, it’s a challenge to keep up. However, by enlisting others and making a concerted effort, you can help to keep your children safe online.

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Posted in Apple, COPPA, Education, Educational Technology, FERPA, Google, Social Media, Technology | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Smarty Pins – Google Maps, geography trivia, and video games

Jennifer Carey:

Some great ways to use Google in the History Classroom!

Originally posted on History Tech:

Google Maps. Geography trivia. And video games. Three of my favorite things. And now, they’re all together in one place.

Google’s new Smarty Pins. (Get it? Smarty Pants – Smarty Pins? You nutty Google engineers!)

Smarty Pins is basically a simple trivia game that asks questions with geo-tagged answers using the Google Maps interface.

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Posted in Archaeology, Art History, Education, Educational Resources, Educational Technology, Google, History, Lesson Plan, Technology | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Reflections on ISTE 2014 Atlanta

Last night I came back from ISTE 2014 in Atlanta. As ISTE always is, it’s empowering, inspiring, overwhelming, and exhausting. This year, I had the privilege of becoming a board member of the ISTE Independent School Educators Network  (new twitter hashtag #isteisen) and Co-Chair of Professional Development with Kelsey Vrooman. If you want to join us for our first Professional Development event, we will be discussing Danah Boyd’s book “It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens” (available at book retailers in print and eBook form and as a free download here) with the author on October 7 at 3:30 EST. This event is free and open for all via this link.

It would be impossible for me to discuss everything I took away from this conference – there was just too much! However, I can highlight a few things. Google, as we have seen at ISTE’s past, has really raised the bar with free professional development and resources for educators and schools. You can learn more about Google Apps for Education (GAFE) here. Google expanded on its release of Classroom, that will hopefully be available this fall. The Google Playground also presented several cool features. One of my favorites is fusion tables, Moss Pike of Harvard Westlake School demonstrated how you can use this in conjunction with Google Forms to delve deeper into your data (e.g. using a school survey and then analyzing collected data by age, grade level, department, etc).

Courtesy of Deviant Art

Courtesy of Deviant Art

Gamification was a big theme at the conference as well. Numerous educators and students held poster sessions and talks demonstrating the power of Minecraft in their classrooms. Douglas Kiang of Punahou discussed the power of games in his presentation “From Minecraft to Angry Birds: What Games Teach us about Learning.”

Vinnie Vrotny, the new Director of Technology at the Kinkaid School, organized and hosted the Maker Playground. The Maker Movement has become a key theme in education and the role it can play in children being innovative, inventive, and invested in their own education.

Overall my take away from ISTE is that technology is quickly revolutionizing education and encouraging discussions and change.

Posted in Apple, Education, Educational Technology, Google, Technology | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Day 1 at ISTE

Today was my first day at the 2014 ISTE Conference. If you have never attended ISTE, it’s often awe-inspiring as well as overwhelming. It’s an exciting and exhilarating time for educators – especially those of us passionate about the role of technology in education. I spent much of the day catching up with my peers that I only see on the conference circuit, including my old classmate Moss Pike, Ph.D. from the Harvard Westlake School, my friend and mentor Larry Kahn (soon to be Tech Director of the Iolani School), and Vinnie Vrotney (the new Tech Director of the Kinkaid School and new chair of the ISTE Independent School Educator Network).

There is so much that I am looking forward to this week – seeing what Google has up its sleeve (especially Classroom), learning what other schools are doing, the Maker Playground on Tuesday 9:00 – 1:00pm! It’s going to be an exciting conference!

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ISTE 2014

I’m heading off to ISTE 2014 in Atlanta. I had the privilege of presenting an Ignite session last year on Digital Storytelling.

My experience with ISTE is that it’s busy, dizzying, overwhelming, and exciting. I will try to post while I am there but don’t be surprised if I have to wait until I return to post a reflective piece.

If you will be at ISTE this year, let me know. I would love to meet up with my peers in the field.

Posted in Education, Educational Technology | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

NYT – “The Great War: A 100 Year Legacy of World War I” Interactive

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

My colleague and friend Kate Bloomfield, a teacher in the Social Studies department at Ransom Everglades School, forwarded me this great link for the New York Times: “The Great War: A 100 Year Legacy of World War I.”

The website includes articles, interviews, archived news reports, and interactive maps from World War I. This is a great resource for educators to teacher both contemporary reactions to war as well as its far reaching implications.

Posted in Education, Educational Resources, Educational Technology, History, Military History, Technology, United Kingdom, United States History, World War I | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The 7 best places for finding iOS apps

Jennifer Carey:

Some great tips if you own iOS devices!

Originally posted on History Tech:

I get the chance to spend a lot of my time working with Apple products and how they can be integrated into instruction. This means, obviously, I also get the chance to work with lots of educators who are looking for just the right tool and just the right app. And we always memorize together the mantra – “it’s not about the app, it’s about what kids do with the app. It’s not about the app, it’s about what kids do with the app.”

But there is still a need to know what sorts of things are out there. So today, seven of my favorite places to go to find just the right tool for what you want kids to do.

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Why We Went Google Apps

This is reblogged from my guest post on the blog Ed Tech Researcher (a great blog to add to your RSS feed) in Education Week. I will be presenting on this topic at the annual SAIS conference in Atlanta.

blog-EdTechResearcher02

From time to time I’ll have some guest posts this summer. I’m very pleased to have Jen Carey kick things off. She’s been a fabulous colleague for EdTechTeacher, and an amazing live blogger at our events, and she’ll be speaking at the EdTechTeacher Summit in Chicago in July. Here are her thoughts on why her school recently adopted Google Apps for Education. 

Why we went Google Apps for Education

Ransom Everglades School is a successful day school located in Coconut Grove, Fl. We pride ourselves on the progressive and innovative education that we provide our students, and our students do well in the college placement process. So then it may surprise some that we proactively explored and then implemented Google Apps for Education at our school. After all, if we are satisfied with our achievements, why would we look at making and applying a significant change at Ransom Everglades?

There are several reasons for this of course. Like all good educational institutions, we look to the future – what will our students need to be successful in college and graduate school, as well as to lead satisfying and productive lives? How can we better facilitate the needs of our teachers and staff? How can we continue to achieve our standards of excellence? Like many other educational institutions, we heard a great deal about Google Apps for Education, so we decided to explore what it had to offer that could benefit the Ransom Everglades community.

What is GAFE

Google Apps for Education (GAFE) is a prominent technology tool that has been gaining momentum in both K-12 as well as higher education. It includes Google’s core suite of applications (DriveCalendarContactsGMailSitesTalks/Hangouts) with the added ability to control, scale, and manage access with an eye for an educational institution’s individual needs. For example, we activated Google Drive for students (so that they could use the Word Processing and Cloud Storage provided) but disabled GMail (as we use our exchange server for email services); also, we enabled Talks/Hangouts for Faculty and Students grades 10-12 to facilitate communication between faculty and online study groups for our AP Students. The highly customizable features of GAFE allowed us to explore available options and then implement them progressively and as needed.

Promote 21st Century Skills

The development of 21st century learning and skills (collaboration with peers, digital literacy, effectively harnessing Social Media, and drawing skill sets across multiple disciplines) is no longer optional for students or teachers. Again, Google Apps for Education allows us as an institution to promote them within a safe and managed environment. Students can collaborate on research projects and papers using Google Drive’s share features. By using tools such as Google Sites, students can create digital portfolios (I provide several examples in my article, “Google Sites for ePortfolios“) to highlight their accomplishments and demonstrate their learning through multi-modal examples (documents, imagery, video, and more). What I like best as an educator, is that by building their work within Google Tools, I can monitor their progress and provide feedback as they build and revise in real time! This is instrumental in assessing not just the end result, but the process (see my article, “Google Drive & Research Essays: Monitoring the Writing Process“).

Security and Privacy

Along with more prominent use of internet tools has come greater concern for student security and privacy. Many third party tools mine student data, use content for their own advertising purposes, and struggle with protecting valuable and sensitive data from hackers. Google itself, in its individual services, states that your documents, emails, and content created, stored, and sent via Google can be mined for content and sold to third party advertisers. This is exactly why there is a 13 year old age requirement for signing up for many services online (including Google). Several Federal mandates, such as FERPACIPA, and COPPA, establish basic requirements and guidelines for institutions to protect student’s data and privacy online. Google Apps for Education is compliant with these mandates, in fact it is why there is not an age 13 age restriction for students to sign up for GAFE accounts. Institutional and student content cannot be provided to third parties and identities and information must be protected through robust, secure servers. Additionally, by using third parties tools like Cloudlock, we can ensure that our students are engaging and collaborating with others appropriately and safely.

Cost Effective

Google Apps for Education is a free service provided for schools. However, it would be misleading to state that there are no costs involved. Just like all tech roll-outs, it is important to provide effective professional development for faculty and staff so that they can not only learn the basic features of these tools, but use them to deliver more innovative and pedagogically rich lessons. For example, one can simply replace Microsoft Word with Google Docs. At the same time, that doesn’t take advantage of Docs’ ability to collaborate and share with peers, effectively use its research tools, or for teachers to employ the revision history tool in order to monitor the revision process to better understand the evolution of a student’s work.

In addition to professional development and training for faculty and staff, it may also be necessary to hire external support specialists to audit your exchange server (if you wish to migrate your calendar and mail services to Google) or sync your logins using a tool like GADS. It is always necessary to invest in assessment and planning on the front end to avoid serious complications after the fact.

Even with these initial investments, the cost savings in the long-term are astronomical. You do not have to pay for an expensive cloud based or remote login solution to allow faculty and students to access content off campus, you can save thousands of dollars on software licensing, provide greater storage space (GAFE currently provides 30GB of free cloud storage), and by migrating many of your internal services to the cloud you can free up your IT staff to focus on more important internal needs.

Single Solution

As Director of Educational Technology at Ransom, one of my favorite features of GAFE is that it provides a single solution for multiple issues – students can use Google Drive to create documents, spreadsheets, and presentations; students and faculty can share large files (such as images and videos) with ease; departments, staff, and students can maintain a single calendar; and Google Sites can readily serve for ePortfolios, class sites, and blog platforms. Instead of researching multiple different tools (having to focus on cost, privacy issues, and compatibility), there is often a tool in the Google Suite that will fit our needs.

Another great feature of Google Tools is that they are cloud based and cross-platform compatible. While our school primarily runs on a Windows platform, there are exceptions on campus within our Arts and Yearbook programs; many students and faculty have Macs at home; and if someone wants to access a resource on a phone there is not only iOS and Android, but Windows Phone and Blackberry (at least for now). Google Apps works across all of these platforms via Apps or a simple web browser. For example, a student can create a video on their iPhone at home, upload it to Google Drive via the App, and then share it with their teacher or classmates without having to use a flashdrive, email, or other creative solution. It seamlessly integrates across platforms. Specifically at Ransom Everglades, we struggled with more effective ways to use iPads. We are on a shared-cart model and using the Google Drive iPad App (free), we can readily get media on and off of the iPads, rendering them more effective mobile learning platforms.

Integration with Other Tools

With the rising ubiquity of GAFE in K-12 and higher education (more than 20 million students worldwide, 7 of 8 Ivy League Colleges, 72 of the top 100 schools; you can see their exponential growth along with their customers here), more and more educational services now integrate with Google. This is great for providing your users with easy single-sign-on options for third party apps, integrating with Learning Management Systems, and overall blending numerous services under a single umbrella. This allows for better and easier incorporation of new tools at your institution.

Greening

Like many other institutions, Ransom Everglades has a greening initiative. We recognize that our environment’s resources are limited and we must do our part to limit waste and promote conservation efforts. The suite of tools within Google Apps for Education allows us to move forward with that initiative. For example, by providing students handouts via a shared Google Drive folder, I limit printing in my classroom. By storing documents and materials online, I not only conserve space but limit paper use. By having students store research, organize a project, write and revise electronically we limit waste. As we move forward with Google Apps for Education in conjunction with a robust overhaul of our wireless infrastructure and broadband, we hope to further our efforts to make our institution more environmentally friendly.

Moving Forward

At Ransom Everglades, Our GAFE deployment is still in its early stages. However, after witnessing its successes in our initial pilot and deployment we have plans to explore a more extensive roll-out, such as migrating our exchange server, expanding our training, and moving our non sensitive records and documents to the cloud. Google Apps for Education has helped us to maintain and further our standards of excellence by promoting a more robust pedagogy, supporting our faculty and students in their needs, and continuing to allow us to provide innovative and robust pedagogy within our established rigorous curriculum.

For regular updates, follow me on Twitter at @bjfr and for my papers, presentations and so forth, visit EdTechResearcher.

Posted in Education, Educational Resources, Educational Technology, Google, Pedagogy, Technology | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Great Sites for Primary Sources!

As a History Teacher (with a background in archaeology) I understand the relevance and importance of primary sources in the classroom. Primary sources are not solely essays or primary works, but art, photographs, and other avenues of popular culture.

Finding primary source documents on the web can sometimes be a bit of a scavenger hunt. I know that I have spent hours scouring the web for good translations, excerpted texts, or relevant materials. Additionally, incorporating primary source texts can be a challenge with high school children. Often, when I distribute an original text, it is the first time they have seen a document of this type. Additionally, as much as we educators do not like to admit, sometimes it is a challenge for us to come up with ideas and activities to effectively incorporate this material into our classrooms. How do we make this interesting? How do we make this comprehensible? How do we make this relevant? Bringing in an original work and simply tossing it into a classroom environment is a sure-fire method for failure – students will often be confused, bored, and overwhelmed. Teaching with primary sources requires preparation and method.

In this article, I am highlighting several websites that focus on providing primary sources for educators and students. These sites are all excellent resources for educators in the Social Studies with a broad range of topics: American History, World History, World Religions, Language, Literature, Art, and Politics. There are many more amazing resources out there and I encourage you to add yours as well!

Milestone Documents  (Subscribe to their Facebook and Twitter feeds (all free) for regular highlights of documents in their catalogue as well as lesson plan ideas.)

  • Cost: $106.20 for an annual subscription (Class subscriptions are $15/student with free accounts for teachers)
  • Grades: High School and College  (the material is too sophisticated for elementary and middle school).
  • Subject(s): History
  • Geographic Focus: Milestone includes a solid library of texts for all of World History (Ancient, Western, African, United States, and Asian).
  • Additional Subject Focus: In addition to organizing the material by date and region, Milestone has sections of Social History including politics, religion, and women.
  • Material Types: Text-based documents
  • Navigation: The content area is easy to navigate and great for “browsing.” The search feature is excellent for when you know exactly what you need.
  • Teacher Resources: lesson plans, rubrics, and assessment material.
  • Web 2.0 Focus: Many of the lesson plans incorporate Web 2.0 elements – Google Maps, Mind Mapping, etc.

What sets Milestone apart from the free resources listed below is that each document is predicated with a succinct contextual/historical statement. Students and educators are provided with a solid background for the text. Most works are also followed up with a critical analysis essay as well as provocative questions. Milestone is an excellent investment for teachers and students alike.

EDSITEment – Sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities,

  • Cost: Free
  • Grades: K-12
  • Subject(s): Art & CultureForeign LanguageHistory & Social Studies, as well as Literature & Language Arts.
  • Geographic Focus: World
  • Additional Subjects: Current event topics, social history, politics, religion, popular culture, and more. There are many sub-categories that merit exploration.
  • Material Types: Text-based documents, visual material, maps, etc.
  • Navigation: Easy to browse and explore content areas.
  • Teacher Resources: Educator’s using this resource can readily access a multitude of innovative lesson plans, activities, assessment materials, alignment with Common Core Standards, worksheets, and listings for additional materials and resources.
  • Web 2.0: Many lesson plans incorporate Web 2.0 elements

Smithsonian Education – Sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution

  • Cost: Free
  • Grades: K-12
  • Subject(s): Art & DesignScience & TechnologyHistory & CultureLanguage Arts
  • Geographic Focus: World (US History most thorough)
  • Additional Subjects: Current event topics, social history, art history
  • Material Types: Text-based documents, visual material, audio recordings, maps, etc.
  • Navigation: Easy to browse and explore content areas.
  • Teacher Resources: Educator’s using this resource can readily access a multitude of innovative lesson plans, activities, assessment materials, alignment with Common Core Standards, worksheets, and listings for additional materials and resources.
  • Web 2.0: Many lesson plans incorporate Web 2.0 elements

Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

  • Cost: Free for Educators and Students (private citizens pay per use), must register for access to materials. Gilder Lehrman encourages schools to register as Affiliated Schools (numerous benefits and access to more resources)
  • Grades: K-12, College, Graduate
  • Subjects: American History
  • Geographic Focus: The United States of America
  • Additional Subjects: Social History, Politics, Civil Rights
  • Material Types: Text-based documents, visual material, audio recordings, maps, video, interviews, etc.
  • Navigation: Easy to browse and explore content
  • Teacher Resources: some lesson plans and ideas, collaborative weblog, sponsored Teacher Seminars
  • Web 2.0: very little web 2.0 focus.

The Library of Congress

  • Cost: Free
  • Grades: K-12, College, Graduate
  • Subjects: History
  • Geographic Focus: Heavily focused on the Americas (national and regional histories), limited resources for World History
  • Additional Subjects: Folklore, local histories, veteran history, literature
  • Material Types: Text-based documents, visual material, audio recordings, maps, video, interviews, etc.
  • Navigation: Tricky to browse and search, requires adaptability
  • Teacher Resources: Some sections have extensive teachers resources in the form of lesson plans and activities, others are more spartan in their construct. LOC offers grants for professional development.
  • Web 2.0: Some sections readily incorporate web 2.0 activities, others are more limited and traditional.

Perseus Digital Library – Sponsored by Tufts University

  • Cost: Free
  • Grades: 9-12, College, Graduate
  • Subject: History, Art History, Archaeology
  • Geographic Focus: Heavily focused on Greco-Roman (founded as a Classical Library it contains all Latin & Greek works), ArabicGermanic19th century AmericaRenaissance Europe, Egyptian Papyri
  • Additional Subjects: Humanism, Literature
  • Material Types: Text-based documents, visual material; the Art & Archaeology Artifact Browser provides High Definition images of thousands of artifacts.
  • Navigation: Tricky to browse, excellent search capabilities. This is an fabulous tool so long as you know what you are looking for.
  • Teacher Resources: No lesson plans or activities, purely material resources.
  • Web 2.0: No web 2.0 incorporation.

Internet History Sourcebook by Fordham University

  • Cost: Free
  • Grades: 9-12, College, Graduate
  • Subject: History, Art History, Archaeology
  • Geographic Focus: Europe, Africa, Asia
  • Additional Subjects: Humanism, Literature, Religion, LGBTQ, Women
  • Material Types: Text-based documents
  • Navigation: Tricky to browse, excellent search capabilities. This is an fabulous tool so long as you know what you are looking for.
  • Teacher Resources: Limited lesson plan archive
  • Web 2.0: No web 2.0 incorporation.

Hanover Historical Text Collection by Hanover College

  • Cost: Free
  • Grades: 9-12, College, Graduate
  • Subject: History
  • Geographic Focus: Europe, Africa, Asia, United States
  • Additional Subjects: Humanism, Literature, Religion, Women
  • Material Types: Text-based documents
  • Navigation: Limited content makes it easy to browse.
  • Teacher Resources: No lesson plans
  • Web 2.0: No web 2.0 incorporation.

National Archives

  • Grades: K-12, College, Graduate
  • Subjects: History
  • Geographic Focus: Heavily focused on the Americas (national and regional histories), limited resources for World History
  • Additional Subjects: Folklore, local histories, veteran history, literature
  • Material Types: Text-based documents, visual material, audio recordings, maps, video, interviews, etc.
  • Navigation: Easy to navigate and browse
  • Teacher Resources: Lesson plans for all grade levels and incorporation of Common Core.
  • Web 2.0: Some sections readily incorporate web 2.0 activities, others are more limited and traditional.

As you can see, there are numerous and extensive resources readily available to educators. The list that I highlighted are a good start, but hardly an all encompassing list. If you have suggestions or additions, please add them here! In the meantime, get browsing for some great material and lesson plan ideas!

Posted in Archaeology, Art History, Classics, Education, Educational Resources, Educational Technology, History, Lesson Plan, Museums, Pedagogy, Professional Development, Technology | Tagged , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

The Best Museums on Flickr

A photographer friend of mine, Christian Santiago, recently redirected me to Flickr. I remember the Flickr of a few years ago, largely used as a repository for vacation photos. Wow has Flickr grown up! As a Social Studies teacher, I am always on the look out for high quality images that are Creative Commons Licensed. Now, museums around the world are using Flickr as a means to showcase and share their collections. What makes these Flickr streams especially valuable is that they use them to highlight their archived material.

Here is a short list of museums on Flickr:

Boys picking up garbage, courtesy of the Library of Congress

Boys picking up garbage, courtesy of the Library of Congress

The Library of Congress – An amazing repository of images from American history, some of the highlights include Dorothea Lange, the history of baseball, and photojournalist collections about child labor.

The Field Museum Library – More than 1,600 images of both the collection of Field Museum and the history of the museum itself.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art – Not only do they have some great images from their collection, but they include photos of their social events including the Met Gala.

The British Library – More than a million images from their collection  covering topics like fashion, cartography, warfare, botany, and more.

The British Museum – While they have only few images from their collection, they post pictures and videos from their live events around the world, such as Nelson Mandela Day and Day of the Dead Altar.

Prairie Dawn 1971 Muppets, Courtesy of the Smithsonian Museum

Prairie Dawn 1971 Muppets, Courtesy of the Smithsonian Museum

Guggenheim Museum – This is a great way to look at installation exhibits!

National Museum of American History at the Smithsonian – Not only do they post images from their collection, but pictures of the museums’s history, scanning images for their x 3D collection, and more.

National Media Museum – This English museum focuses on photography, video, memes, and more.

The Smithsonian Institution – A great highlight of material at all of the Smithsonian Institutions.

Smithsonian Museum of Natural History – Another amazing collection of natural history artifacts.

Los Angeles County Museum of Modern Art – A nice overview of the collection and exhibits at LACMA.

This is only a small collection, but Fickr is an excellent resource for educators looking for unique, high quality images to incorporate into lessons or to teach students about licensing online content.

Posted in Anthropology, Archaeology, Art History, Classics, Education, Educational Resources, Educational Technology, History, Modern Art, Museums, New World, Pedagogy, Renaissance, Social Media, Technology | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments