Tag Archives: African-American History

Library of Congress Online Exhibit – African American History Month

Carter G. Woodson, historian and founder of Black History Month in America; courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Carter G. Woodson, historian and founder of Black History Month in America; courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

If your’e looking for resources for Black History Month, the Library of Congress has published an extensive online repository “African American History Month.” It focuses on the history of African Americans in popular culture, sports, politics, Civil Rights, art, and more.

You can view written documents, images, audio collections, and video as it pertains to different areas of study and focus. To access content, simply visit here.

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Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education, Teaching Civil Rights

Today marks the anniversary of the landmark case, Brown vs. Board of Education. On this day in 1954, the Supreme Court ruled that the segregation of races for education under the “separate but equal” clause was unconstitutional. The case would begin the unwinding of separate but equal institutions throughout the country (a process that would take decades). In honor of the 59th anniversary, here are a great list of resources for teaching this topic:

National Park Service – The NPS hosts a series of online and real life tours, catalogues  artifacts, images, videos, and more. Check out the website for the Brown v. Board of Education case.

Library of Congress – The Library of Congress highlights Brown v. Board of Education along with a series of other landmark cases, arguments, studies, etc on the issue of Civil Rights in American history. You can explore the LOC online as well as in person.

Ourdocuments.org – Explore high resolution images of the Brown decision as well as other documents related to Civil Rights and the landmark Supreme Court decision.

 

Smithsonian Institution Brown v. Board of Education

Smithsonian Institution Brown v. Board of Education

Separate is Not Equal: Smithsonian Institution – the Smithsonian commemorates the landmark case with an in depth online exhibit that explore segregation in the United States.

National Archives – The National Archives hosts high resolution images of landmark papers, including the Supreme Court deciding and dissenting opinion on the Brown v. Board of Education case.

Library of Congress Electronic Exhibit – African American Odyssey: A Quest for Full Citizenship

The Woolworth sit-in, LOC

The Woolworth sit-in, LOC

In honor of Black History Month, the Library of Congress is hosting the electronic exhibit “African American Odyssey: A Quest for Full Citizenship.” The exhibit displays more than 240 artifacts, including documents, images, videos, and more.

The exhibit “explores black America’s quest for equality from the early national period through the twentieth century.”

This is a rich, multimedia exploration into the experience of African Americans in this country for over 200 years.

Rosa Parks Arrest Record

Rosa Parks’s Mug Shot

Today, Smithsonian Magazine publishes the arrest record of Civil Rights figure Rosa Parks. Parks became a household name and pivotal figure in the Civil Rights movement when, on December 1, 1955, she refused to move from the “whites section” of the bus to the designated “colored section.”

Her action sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott and gave a female face to the Civil Rights movement in Alabama. Parks became an enduring social leader in the United States until her death in 2005.

In the Smithsonian Magazine Article: “Document Deep Dive; Rosa Parks’ Arrest Records,” the author delves into the documents, highlighting pertinent information, exploring the figures involved, and documenting the event in detail. For any American Historian or Civil Rights enthusiast, it is a fascinating look at Jim Crow Alabama.

Texas Drought Uncovers Slave Cemetery

The record dry summer in Texas has uncovered a large slave graveyard in Corsicana, Texas. Archaeologist Alan Skinner of AR Consultants has uncovered at least twenty graves of African Americans, dating to the 19th century.

Archaeologists are currently working with government officials to determine the proper steps to further analyze and ultimately preserve the cemetery. To learn more about the finds, see the article in the Athens Review.