Tag Archives: Holocaust

Auschwitz Survivor Turns to Facebook to Find his Identical Twin

Birkenau_gateMenachem Bodern (born Eli Gottesman in the Ukraine) left Auchwitz on January 27, 1945 with an adopted father who took him to Israel. Now 73 years old, the survivor of the Third Reich’s most notorious death camp has turned to Facebook in the hopes of finding out what happened to his twin brother, Jeno Gottesman.

Equipped only with his faded Auschwitz ID number (A7733) and limited Nazi records, Menachem has sought assistance from Social Media to finally learn the fate of his identical twin brother. The search has turned up some promising but also disturbing news. Both boys were subject to twin testing by the notorious Dr. Josef Mengele (a fate that Menachem fortunately does not remember).  Additionally, he learned that he had a younger brother that died at Auschwitz along with their father. However, amongst the sad news there is also a ray of hope, that his brother Jeno was officially declared healthy and alive by medical staff at Auschwitz on February 9, 1945.

Menachem and his family have set up a facebook page, A7734 (the number given to his brother Josef). To learn more about his journey, please visit his page on Facebook and the story on CNN.

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A Media Specialist’s Guide to the Internet: Teaching Tolerance to Our Students

I first heard about The Southern Poverty Law Center from my aunt. She told me all the things they were doing to rid the world of hate and injustice. Civil rights lawyers Morris Dees and Joseph Levin Jr. founded SPLC in 1971 and the organization is known globally for “tracking and exposing the activities of hate groups.”  SPLC’s project, Teaching Tolerance, offers free magazine subscriptions to teachers, as well as free film kits, which include DVDs (and accompanying teacher’s guide) about bullying,…

A Media Specialist’s Guide to the Internet: Teaching Tolerance to Our Students.

Best Online and Interactive International Museums

Very few educators can take their class, hope on an airplane, skirt through customs, and visit the Hague. Here is a brief list of great museums that have wonderful online exhibits that can help to bring the museum and its contents to your students. This list is hardly all inclusive, please add your own!!

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum – The purpose of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial is to record the events at Hiroshima and Nagasaki and to educate the populace about the horrors of nuclear warfare. The powerful museum has numerous online exhibits, videos, images, lesson plans, and more.

National Museum of Australia – One of the largest and most expansive museums in the world, the National Museum of Australia highlights the Natural Sciences, the Indigenous Peoples of Australia, and Art from around the world. Selected exhibits have interactive online components.

Anne Frank Museum – the online Anne Frank Museum includes documents in high resolution (including images), video, and a 3D tour of the apartment that housed the Frank house in Amsterdam.

The Uffizi Museum – The Digital Archives of the Uffizi museum are hosted online (not all works have been digitized, new pieces added regularly). This is an excellent tool to help students and educators explore the amazing art housed at this museum.

Rijksmuseum – The art from this Dutch museum has been catalogued, digitized, and put online. Each is accompanied with detailed history and, in some cases, external links and information. A wonderful site to explore.

British Museum – The British Museum is one of the largest and most expansive in the world. Selected exhibits are online.

The Hermitage Museum – The museum has a virtual tour of the museum online! You can now walk through the galleries (with 3D imagery) and examine individual works in their selected spaces.

The Louvre – The louvre also has virtual tours of the museum galleries. Walk through the halls and enjoy the art individually or as a collective whole.

Identifying the Children of the Holocaust

More than one million children died during the Holocaust, many of them separated from their families and alone. Now, the United States Holocaust Museum has begun the “Remember Me Project,” a program aimed at identifying more than 1,100 children of the Holocaust who as of yet remain nameless – girls and boys, blondes, brunettes, some teens, some infants, all unique but with one unifying factor – they remain nameless victims of the Third Reich.

To learn more about the project and to help if you can, please see the Remember Me Project and read these articles from the Associated Press and MSNBC.

Anne Frank Museum – Now Online

The Anne Frank Museum has just launched an online initiative that allows visitors to tour the small enclosure from their home computers. It’s a wonderful educational tool for anyone who teaches the touching story of this young girl.

If you have not visited the website for the Anne Frank House, I highly encourage you to do so. It has some amazing content and now, with the addition of the online tour, opens it up to people who would otherwise be unable to experience this cramped and tiny apartment.

Despite everything, I believe that people are really good at heart.