“Nazca Lines” Discovered in the Middle East

Nazca Monkey

The famous Nazca Lines in South America, a series of geoglyphs visible only from the sky, appear to not be a unique find. New satellite mapping technologies has identified a series of wheel-shaped geoglyphs in the Middle East – the program is focused in Jordan.

The wheels are theorized to be 2,000 years old, located on lava fields, and are upwards of 80 feet in diameter. The wheels appear to be encompassed in a larger landscaping. It’s an amazing find in Jordan.

To learn more about this discovery, read the article in Living Science.

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7 thoughts on ““Nazca Lines” Discovered in the Middle East

  1. Jim Wheeler

    Ah, I see now – my error.

    My impression of the Jordanian geoglyphs is that they are much less rigorous than the Peruvian structures, either mathematically or artistically. The article does say that some, called “kites”, are in fact functional and not artistic. I can’t help but suspect that could be true of the others. Also, I see that they are considered “much older” than the Peruvian designs, which leaves me wondering about the accuracy of dating surface items subjected to the erosion of the elements. Just thinking.

    Reply
    1. Jennifer Lockett Post author

      Yes, some healthy skepticism. I’m waiting to see the official publication in the Journal of Archaeological Science before rendering my own thoughts/opinions – I want to see the data (not filtered through a journalist).
      Still, looks interesting…

      Reply
  2. Pingback: “Nazca Lines” Discovered in the Middle East « Indiana Jen | ENA news

  3. Pingback: “Nazca Lines” Discovered in the Middle East « Indiana Jen : GEA News

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