Author Archives: Jennifer Carey

About Jennifer Carey

My name is Jennifer Carey and I am a student and educator of the human condition. I have long studied history, trained in archaeology, and found a passion in the field of education. As a long-time lover of technology (my father bought our family our first Apple IIe when I was three), I love technology and what it can bring to the classroom. I have taught at various Universities for many years as well as educating gifted teenagers through the Johns Hopkins program, the Center for Talented Youth. I am currently the Director of Educational Technology at the Ransom Everglades School (a secular independent school) in Miami, Fl. I also have a few educational podcasts on iTunes from my days teaching at TCU: The Ancient City of Rome, Classical Archaeology (2008), Classical Archaeology (2009), Introduction to Classical Myth, and Ancient Eats. They’re enhanced (so you get the PowerPoints along with the vocal), but please excuse the poor audio editing. Feel free to Email Me or follow me on twitter.

3 Ways for Educators to use G-Suite Team Drives

At the end of September, Google released Drive for Teams. This is a new way to organize collaborative tools and folders within the existing Google Drive ethos.

Content ownership and sharing are managed at the team level, and new roles give more granular control over team content. Team Drives help streamline teamwork from end-to-end, from onboarding a new team member (add her to the team and she instantly has access to all of the work in one place) to offboarding a departing team member (remove him from the team and all of his work stays right in place), and everything in-between. –Google Cloud Blog

I’ve had the opportunity to play with Team Drives. It certainly has the potential to make my life as an educator a little easier. Here are three ways that educators can use Teams in their school:

g-suite-product-launch-2

Courtesy of Google Cloud Blog

Collaborate across Division/Grade Level/Department

Educators do not work solo. Instead, we often work together and collaborate on many different levels. Using Google Teams, you can create digital, collaborative work spaces. If you are working with others at the division, grade, or department level, Drive for Teams is a great place to engage with your peers. You can share files, a Google Doc, and more. Additionally, no more hunting for that file or document that someone shared with you two months ago. It’s all in the same place!

Collaborate on Classes

If you team teach a class or want to collaborate with others who teach the same subject, Team Drive is a great place to do that! You can share educational resources (work sheets, lessons, projects, etc) and engage with your colleagues remotely. This is a great way to make collaboration easier.

Collaborate on Administrative Projects

Many educators have administrative duties. If you are working on a project with others, a Team Drive is a great place to organize and share resources. You can set up a team drive for each project, adding only those who are working on the project. You can share large files, images, Google Docs, and more.

Ultimately, I think that the new Teams features will add higher levels of usability and organization to the existing set of G-Suite Tools.

Why You Should Become a Google Certified Educator (That have Nothing to do with Badging).

If you look to the right of my page, you’ll notice that I have a handful of badges. One of them, is the Google Certified Educator badge. Collecting badges can be a nice way to show off (and teachers really need to toot their own horn once in a while). However, there are a lot of substantive reasons to take the plunge and become a Google Certified Educator that don’t involve the flashy badge.

Try Out New Google Tools

While you may be familiar with the whole set of G-Suite Tools, most of us spend the majority of our time on one or two (hint, hint – gmail and Google Docs). By becoming a Google Certified educator, you’re forced to learn more about the tools you may neglect. For example, when I went through my re-certification, I spent a lot more time learning about all of the cool things you could do with Google Sites! I was forced to spend more time in platforms I normally don’t use.

Learn new Tricks with your Favorite Tools

You may spend all day every day in Google Docs, but how deep do you really go? If you’ve been looking for an excuse to learn more automated tricks, studying for your Google Certified Educator exam can help you to delve more deeply into the tools that you use on a regular basis. Learn how to write code in Google Sheets, find add-ons for Google Docs, or create a self-graded quiz in Google Forms. No matter how well you know a tool, you can always learn more.

Get New Ideas for Using Tools in the Classroom

I was not a big fan of the previous iteration of Google Certified Educator exams. I felt that they focused on minutiae and rote memorization. Google really stepped it up on this new exam. Now, it’s interactive and requires real-world application. In fact, one or two of the questions gave me ideas for my own classroom. That’s probably what I like best about the new exam, you learn something while taking it.

Get Verification of Your Skills

You know your a Google guru, maybe your boss knows it as well. Now, you have proof! Nothing better than proving your abilities with something concrete! Okay, maybe that is a little bit of badging…

View & Access over 6,000 Photochrom Prints from the Library of Congress

The Library of Congress has published its collection of more than 6,000 photochrom pictures from the turn of the 20th century. The collection includes images from Europe, Asia, and North America from the 1890’s-1910.

You can view and access the collection here.

chicago-river-elevators

Detroit Photographic Co. Chicago River elevators. ca. 1900. Image. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2008679501/. (Accessed November 15, 2016.)

How to be Digitally Literate in an Era of Fake News

Courtesy of PEW Research

Courtesy of PEW Research

America just completed an especially volatile and polarizing Presidential election. This was the first major election where both sides waged war not simply using traditional means (pounding the pavement, call centers, and mailers), but using online digital tools. On Facebook and Twitter, stories were shared, hashtags were created, and mud-slinging took on new levels. New research from PEW suggests that most American adults now consume news via Social Media (Facebook, Twitter, and Reddit being the most popular). Television news (both local and national) is still the most prominent source of news, but it is quickly giving way to the internet of things.

This in and of itself is not inherently bad. I have given up my print subscription to various news and magazines sites in favor of their digital platforms. This fits with my desire to have the most up to date news, travel-friendly options, and to keep a lower eco footprint. However, what has sprung up and been the topic of much debate is the prevalence of fake news, especially on social media platforms such as Facebook.

The Guardian and Buzzfeed News have both posted investigative articles highlighting the proliferation of fake news websites and stories targeting America’s vitriolic Presidential election. The motives are less about changing political minds and more about cashing in on the election’s most passionate members. Clickbait headlines titled: “Hilary in 2013: I would like to see people like Donald Trump run for office; They’re honest and can’t be bought!” or “Mike Pence says Michelle Obama is the most vulgar first lady we’ve ever had!” These are fairly mild titles, others claim to reveal sex tapes of candidates (or their spouses), calls for a race war, or endorsements from the Pope.

These news sites set up pages on Facebook and encourage their users to share, share, share! The more shares and clicks, the more revenue these sites see from tools such as Google’s adsense. While Facebook, Google, and other organizations are working on ways to combat fake news, the process will be slow and users should not rely on these media to serve as filters for them. Instead, educators should focus even more on teaching themselves and their students to be more digitally literate and savvy. There are a few tools that are in your arsenal to use right away.

Is the Story & Headline Over the Top?

No matter how much you dislike (or even despise) your political opponent, you should immediately be suspicious of a headline that reeks of sensationalism. Claims that an arrest is pending, signs of devil worship, calls for genocide, or other topics that just sound outrageous, go into the story with a cautious attitude.

Is the Story from a Legitimate News Source?

If you are reading a shared story, be sure to check the source. In this day of news clamoring for clicks and ratings, it’s not unusual for them to use sensational headlines to get readers. However, check for the author and publisher. Established news sources (The New York Times, the Washington Post, the BBC, your local paper, etc) have systems in place to confirm sources and vet information. If you have never heard of the news organization publishing the article or they do not have an author listed, be suspicious.

Read the Article

This may seem a little obvious, but a lot of people share headlines rather than stories. Read the story yourself and see if it matches the headline. I recently read a story

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

entitled “President of Mexico contacts President-Elect Trump to Discuss Details of the Wall.” However, when you read the story, it simply said that the President of Mexico had contacted President-elect Trump to congratulate him on his win (a common practice by all foreign governments). Reading an article may also make it clear that the news information is suspect. If it contains a lot of typos and grammatical errors, that is a red flag. Legitimate news sources proofread and edit all articles prior to publication. While a typo or two make sneak through, it’s a rarity.

Check the Source Information

If the article claims that Wikileaks, public statements, tax documents, or other information “reveals” information, they should be linking or providing copies of that information. I have seen New York Times articles on the Clinton email scandal directly link back to the Wikileaks information dump. If the article contains no evidence or sources to back it up, assume the information is false.

Look for other Verifying Sources

While one news source may trump another on a story, they all will get to it eventually. If you read a story, confirm it with another source. If you see a sensational topic being covered by one outlet only, the information is suspect. The issue of media-bias is often cited as the reason one news outlet covers a story. However, there are numerous left and right leaning legitimate news organizations. No single outlet is the purveyor of the truth. Follow the journalistic mandate of “at least two independent, reliable sources.”

Perhaps the best way to avoid getting tricked by false news stories on social media is to keep yourself well informed by reading, watching, and listening to a variety of news outlets. The more informed you are of the current trends and cycles in the news, the more likely you are to immediately smell out a false story.

 

 

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Bye bye public #Education in America

A wonderful take on politics (on both sides) and education in America. Public education must be prioritized.

EDUWELLS

Every 11 seconds on Wall street, someone has the thought “There are billions of dollars tied up in public education that I can’t make more money on using the money I already have.” The phrase “Corporate education” does not sit comfortably with most voters on both sides of the political divide and so right-wing parties and their financial market friends around the globe try to disguisecorporate education modelsunder better sounding socialinitiatives, such as “School choice.” Trump obviously hasn’t had a thought about education and so has borrowed one from the Koch brothers.

Learning is first about money making

It’s Facebook thatpersonifiesthe idea that all human activity should now be monetised as the social-media giantindirectly makes money on every photo and comment we upload. [Note: The scary prospect of how much money Trump made Facebook in the last 18 months.] So why shouldn’t the activity of learning be…

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Effective Ways for Educators to Use Twitter

I am a big fan of using Twitter to share, collaborate, and learn. This infographic highlights many ways that educators can use Twitter in their practice.

infographic26 Effective Ways to use Twitter for Teachers and Educators Infographic
Find more education infographics on e-Learning Infographics

Find Anything in you Google Drive

If you are anything like me, your Google Drive is a bit of a mess. No matter how much I try to keep it organized, documents and files find their way outside of my carefully crafted and structured filing system. This isn’t just an issue for my Google Drive account. I have this problem in general.

search-windowWell, the benefit of using Google Drive for your file storage is that you get to use Google’s Search features within you Drive. If you type a key term (like the document title) in the Google Drive Search Bar, it will pull up all files with that title and it will also search within the document for key terms. If you would like to narrow your search further, you can edit features such as: owner (to find that file shared with you by someone else), shared with (to find that document you’re collaborating on), file-type, dated modified, and more.

So, even if you’re terrible at organization (like I am), you can always find the file that you’re looking for!