Author Archives: Jennifer Carey

About Jennifer Carey

My name is Jennifer Carey and I am a student and educator of the human condition. I have long studied history, trained in archaeology, and found a passion in the field of education. As a long-time lover of technology (my father bought our family our first Apple IIe when I was three), I love technology and what it can bring to the classroom. I have taught at various Universities for many years as well as educating gifted teenagers through the Johns Hopkins program, the Center for Talented Youth. I am currently the Director of Educational Technology at the Ransom Everglades School (a secular independent school) in Miami, Fl. I also have a few educational podcasts on iTunes from my days teaching at TCU: The Ancient City of Rome, Classical Archaeology (2008), Classical Archaeology (2009), Introduction to Classical Myth, and Ancient Eats. They’re enhanced (so you get the PowerPoints along with the vocal), but please excuse the poor audio editing. Feel free to Email Me or follow me on twitter.

A Great Interactive, Presentation Tool

Let’s be honest, there are a million ways out there to make a presentation and just as many tools designed to help you do just that. Recently, I was introduced to a new tool for creating beautiful, interactive presentations and infographics that actually impressed me: Visme. Visme allows you to create a variety of presentation media: traditional slide-decks, auto-flowing slide decks with embedded content, interactive infographics, design and product features, and more. Here’s a great introduction to Visme:

If you’re a teacher, Visme is a great way to create flipped content, empower students to create robust and beautiful presentations, or otherwise create material to distribute to others. In Visme’s Learning Center, you can easily learn about new features, access tips and tricks, and be inspired by what others have done.

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5 Reasons Why Educators Need to Network

Networking

Terms like “networking” are often reserved for the business world. Many educators not only do not proactively network, but they are often discouraged from doing so. However, networking is essential to professional growth and, thus, for educational professionals. While a few teachers and administrators have taken this call and run, especially on platforms such as Twitter, many teachers are still isolated in their classrooms. Here are a few reasons educators should be actively networking:

Classrooms & Schools are Isolating

Schools are busy places and teachers and administrators often become isolated in their schools and classrooms. If you teach five periods, have 1 or 2 preps, and are inundated with paperwork, planning, and students seeking extra help, it can be challenge to meet with other teachers at your school let alone outside of it. Networking can help you keep your finger on the pulse of education as a whole, your subject matter, or your grade-level. It can bring you out of your island into a richer realm of professionals.

Great Professional Development isn’t Always Formal

One of the best benefits for educators is using their network for extended professional development – new trends in practice, a great book, a profound lesson plan, or feedback on a challenge. These are all reasons to tap your broad network of peers.

Education is a Profession Just Like Investment Banking – Treat it Like One

I often get frustrated about the view that education is not so much a profession, but glorified baby sitting. Educators often hold advanced degrees, regularly hone their skills, and are the most “professional” people I know. As such, networking helps to emphasize all of those points. It’s also why I encourage my peers not to keep their networks to others in the field – talk to scientists, lawyers, politicians, economists, and more. We teach future scientists and lawyers, so we should draw from them as well.

Networking can Save you Time

This seems counter-intuitive, but building your network can actually help to save you time. A lot of teachers share out lesson plans, can help you with training, or help you find financial support for professional development or tools for your school. This can save you hours of your own time.

Networking is still key to Career Advancement

Some teachers teach for life, others become administrators or advocates for education. Whatever your career goals, networking is still vital. Perhaps you want to move to a new city or state, your network can help you to find a job. If you are looking to become the next superintendent, your network can help you to advance within your district. The same rules of career advancement in other fields apply to education (See point 3).

Networking is vital for educators to be successful in their field as well as their careers. So get online and join a twitter chat, bring business cards with you to your next conference, or attend a local professional networking event. Get your name and your ideas out there!

The ATLIS Conference Schedule: Making Magic Happen

I am about to begin my second year as an Executive Board member of ATLIS and my third year as an organizational member. I have to say that my time with ATLIS has given me the unique opportunity to learn from and engage with my peers in new and powerful ways. I am so excited for the 2017 ATLIS Conference: Making Magic Happen in Los Angeles. The conference featured speakers Jaime Casap and Tim Fish are sure to inspire and the array of sessions will be amazing. You can view the full schedule here. Here are some highlights of the 2017 Conference:

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If you want to attend but still need to register, check out all of the details here.

Lifelong Learning is a Life Skill not a Buzz Word

Working in education, I have seen my share of buzz words (and concepts) come and go. Often they are rebrandings of past, failed initiatives or great ideas that simply don’t work among the established cogs of the modern educational machine. However, one “buzzword” that I believe has been unfairly branded as such is “lifelong learning.” Lifelong learning is “the “ongoing, voluntary, and self-motivated pursuit of knowledge for either personal or professional reasons.” In other words, it’s a self-driven desire to continue to learn and grown in all areas of our lives well after we leave a classroom. I have attended numerous educational conferences and events that highlight the need for educators to inspire “lifelong learning” in their students. In the world of educational buzzwords, it’s easy to roll one’s eyes and get back to the classroom. However, what I have learned in my world of education and technology is that lifelong learning is not the latest flash in the pan. Rather, it is now a necessary life and career skill.

In the past, job changes were few and far between and career changes (barring going back to school for a degree) were practically unheard of. Now, with automation and technology putting more people out of work and a shifting landscape in the economy, job-hopping and career shifts are becoming more prevalent. Forbes highlights that job hopping (moving to a new job every 2-4 years) is becoming a career necessity, often leading to higher salaries, more opportunity for advancement, and a better “cultural fit” at your place of employment.

But besides the fact that job hopping can lead to better opportunity, the reality is that job hopping and career shifts is not just an “acceptable practice” but becoming a necessary one, thus the need for self motivated learning. In his almost dystopian non-fiction work Rise of Robots, Martin Ford argues convincingly that automation and technology will not only be displacing factory workers and manual laborers, but traditionally “safe” jobs that require high levels of (often expensive) education–think lawyers, doctors, and even writers. If the trends that Ford highlights continue, unemployment and (more commonly) under-employment by even the highly educated will persist and grow. The Economist made a similar argument, stating that the solution to these trends is continued education throughout the life of one’s career (whether it stays within a single trajectory or takes a radical shift):

A college degree at the start of a working career does not answer the need for the continuous acquisition of new skills, especially as career spans are lengthening. Vocational training is good at giving people job-specific skills, but those, too, will need to be updated over and over again during a career lasting decades.

In their article “School and the Economy,” economists Murnane and Levy argued that the answer to helping students (and adults) be prepared for the new, shifting economy is to emphasize softer skills: expert thinking and complex communication, primarily “…the ability to solve new problems that cannot be solved by applying rules. (If the problem could be solved by rules, a computer could do it.)”

Lifelong learning empowers individuals to adapt to a variety of new jobs and career paths in the unforeseeable future. Levy and Murnane have a less apocalyptic view of future employment. While they argue that many traditional careers will shrink and even disappear, they view this shifting landscape as one that will open up new avenues and jobs. However, preparing for those jobs requires greater emotional and intellectual agility; a desire and passion to learn new skills and information.

Whatever the future holds for careers, lifelong learning is now a critical component for success. Your current job or position may downsize or all together disappear. New opportunities may be a better fit for your skill set and passions. Whatever the the future holds, being prepared and skilled at adapting to it through continuous learning is vital for success.

My Favorite Podcasts #trypod

This month, there is a big push to recommend your favorite podcasts to others. As an avid podcast listener, I thought that this was a great idea! If you follow my Twitter feed (or know me in person), then you are aware that my interests expand well beyond education, technology, and history. Here are a few of my favorite podcasts!

Social Studies & History

Backstory Radio – Created by historians, this podcasts explores the historical significance of present day issues.

Freakonomics Radio – If you’re a fan of the book Freakonimics, you’ll love the podcast!

Planet Money – Planet money is another economics podcast. It explores the economy of the world today in interesting ways.

Code Switch – This podcast explores race and ethnicity in every day life.

Radiolab Presents: More Perfect – This podcast explores the history of the Supreme Court. I’ve never before heard a podcast that makes the law so interesting!

Just for Fun

Hidden Brain – This podcast explores how people understand their world and the world around them.

The Cracked Podcast – Do you remember Cracked magazine? It went under. Now they have a podcast. I don’t know how to describe it. Just take a listen.

This Life with Dr. Drew & Bob Forrest – I grew up on Loveline. It has since retired. However, Dr. Drew is still an avid podcaster. This Life explores various topics with co-host Bob Forrest.

Note to Self – Note to Self explores the modern, digital world.

The Film Vault – Anderson & Bryan explores various movies and themes. It’s a great podcast for film lovers.

The Miscellaneous Adventures of Mike Carano – Follow Mike Carano as he explores the desert, local diners, drones… wherever life takes him.

Sword & Scale – If you like true crime, check this podcast out!

Free Literary Texts & Resources for Teachers & Students

I recently discovered CommonLit, a free curated repository of fiction and non-fiction works for teachers and students. This is a great resource for educators looking to infuse content into their course work. Educators can browse for content by grade level, grenre, theme, literary device, or standard.

As a history teacher, I especially liked that works included related texts and media. For example, I could access the Articles of Confederation, under paired texts I could then direct students to the Declaration of Independence, the Bill of Rights, and Shay’s rebellion. They also couple it with related Media, such as a Crash Course video.

Teachers can also use CommonLit with their students as a portal to assign readings, assess work, and track progress. It is an all-in-one resource for English, Humanities, and History teachers!

Learn to Build Apps for iOS 10 at Stanford for Free

stanford-itunes-uStanford has released a new iTunes U Course Developing iOS 10 Apps with Swift. In this free course, learn how to craft Apps for iPhone and iPad on Apple’s newest operating system. iTunes U courses are self-paced and free via the iTunes store.

iTunes U is a great way to expand your skill base via free, world-class University courses. Try it out today!