Category Archives: Modern Art

Google Art & Culture is More Robust than Ever

I have been a fan of Google Art & Culture from the days when it was called Google Art Project. By combining Google Maps with Google Art & Culture, you can take a tour of your favorite museums using street view. The latest annotations in Google Art & Culture are far more robust and in depth. Check out this video produced by Google to see how easy it is to use the new features:

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How to enhance your lessons with Google Art Project

This is reblogged from my post on Daily Genius.

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Google Art Project is one of my favorite tools available online. It is a repository of high resolution images and 3D “museum view” virtual art gallery tours. Since its inception in 2011, Google Art Project has grown from its initial collaboration of 17 international museums to more than 151 and is now available in 18 languages.

This is a great tool for introducing students to Art from around the world. Here are a few ideas for lesson plans that you can use in conjunction with Google Art Project.

CREATE & CURATE A GALLERY

Google Art Project will allow you to create and curate your own gallery. You can have students build a project thematically (styles, emotional experiences, etc), chronologically, culturally, and more. Students select the pieces that they want to add to their gallery, move them around (just as a museum curators places art pieces in an exhibit), and then share them privately or publicly. This could be a great way for a student to showcase their understanding of a particular artist or style as a project for an Art History, History, Social Studies, or Humanities course.

COMPARE WORKS OF ART SIDE BY SIDE

Using the “Compare” model, you can put two works of art side by side and perform an in depth analysis of the works. Here is one of my favorite exercises:

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You will see that I have selected A Sunday on La Grande Jatte by Seurat (Chicago Institute of Art) andBreakfast by Signac (Kröller-Müller Museum); both of these artists were masters of pointillism. I have students examine the pieces in high definition, side-by-side, and explore the different techniques between these two artists.

Students write up their comparative analysis in their Art History notebook and present on the stylistic differences in class. This can also help students understand how styles and techniques evolve over time (Seurat and Signac developed pointillism out of the styles of impressionism). You can assign specific works of art to students (like I do above) or you can have students choose and compare pieces on their own.

This is a great way to teach students to engage the content in depth and perform comparative analysis.

STUDENTS STUDY & “FORGE” THE MASTERS

A common practice in Art courses is to study the work of master artists by reproducing their work. A fun way to do this is to ask students to “create a forgery.”

Students could select an artist and study their life, style, work, and technique; the high definition, zoomable figures on Google Art Project allows them to study numerous works of art that are held in collections around the world. After they have done this, ask them to create a fake!

They can host a gallery opening where visitors compare their reproduction to the original works of the artist.

PARTICIPATE IN AN ART TALK

Google hosts regular Hangouts on Air with prominent curators. They announce the schedule on theirGoogle+ page and post the recordings on theirYouTube page. Students can prepare for the announced topic and submit questions to professionals. It’s a great way to engage students with modern Art curation.

Google has also posted some different lesson ideashere. With more and more expansions to the Google Art Project (the most recent being its Street Art Collection), there will be more opportunities for students to explore the world of Art.

This resource continues to grow and provides students with the ability to explore art in new and interesting ways, outside of a textbook, or more in-depth than they could at a museum.

LEARN MORE ABOUT BRINGING GOOGLE INTO YOUR CLASSROOM!

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  • Google & Web Tools in the Student-Centered Classroom
  • Google & Chromebooks
  • The Chromebook Classroom
  • And More!

View the Full Course Catalog at ettsummer.org

Free Technology for Teachers: Explore the World with the Google Cultural Institute

This is reblogged from my post on Free Technology for Teachers

I am a big fan of the Google Cultural Institute; it’s an amazing repository of Artistic Masterpieces, Wonders of the Natural World, Historical Artifacts, and more. By using it as a repository of digital materials, it’s an easy way to access cultural content from around the world in my classroom. I can pull up a high definition image of Van Gogh’s Starry Night and use its powerful zoom features so that students can see the impasto brush strokes. We can explore the Street Art of Sao Paulo with a Google Street View for a unit on modern art or the Ruins at Angkor Wat

Free Technology for Teachers: Explore the World with the Google Cultural Institute.

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The Best Museums on Flickr

A photographer friend of mine, Christian Santiago, recently redirected me to Flickr. I remember the Flickr of a few years ago, largely used as a repository for vacation photos. Wow has Flickr grown up! As a Social Studies teacher, I am always on the look out for high quality images that are Creative Commons Licensed. Now, museums around the world are using Flickr as a means to showcase and share their collections. What makes these Flickr streams especially valuable is that they use them to highlight their archived material.

Here is a short list of museums on Flickr:

Boys picking up garbage, courtesy of the Library of Congress

Boys picking up garbage, courtesy of the Library of Congress

The Library of Congress – An amazing repository of images from American history, some of the highlights include Dorothea Lange, the history of baseball, and photojournalist collections about child labor.

The Field Museum Library – More than 1,600 images of both the collection of Field Museum and the history of the museum itself.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art – Not only do they have some great images from their collection, but they include photos of their social events including the Met Gala.

The British Library – More than a million images from their collection  covering topics like fashion, cartography, warfare, botany, and more.

The British Museum – While they have only few images from their collection, they post pictures and videos from their live events around the world, such as Nelson Mandela Day and Day of the Dead Altar.

Prairie Dawn 1971 Muppets, Courtesy of the Smithsonian Museum

Prairie Dawn 1971 Muppets, Courtesy of the Smithsonian Museum

Guggenheim Museum – This is a great way to look at installation exhibits!

National Museum of American History at the Smithsonian – Not only do they post images from their collection, but pictures of the museums’s history, scanning images for their x 3D collection, and more.

National Media Museum – This English museum focuses on photography, video, memes, and more.

The Smithsonian Institution – A great highlight of material at all of the Smithsonian Institutions.

Smithsonian Museum of Natural History – Another amazing collection of natural history artifacts.

Los Angeles County Museum of Modern Art – A nice overview of the collection and exhibits at LACMA.

This is only a small collection, but Fickr is an excellent resource for educators looking for unique, high quality images to incorporate into lessons or to teach students about licensing online content.

Smarthistory: Khan Academy for Social Studies

Great Mosque at Damascus by G. Lewis, courtesy of Smarthistory & Flickr

Great Mosque at Damascus by G. Lewis, courtesy of Smarthistory & Flickr

Khan Academy is popular in math for its brief lectures and interactive modules. However, you can also use it in the Social Studies. Check out Smarthistory, a free multimedia platform for student and teacher of history, archaeology, museum curation, and art history.

It includes an interactive timeline, in-depth yet easy to understand articles, vibrant images, and videos about topics throughout history and around the globe. Check out “Teach with Smarthistory” for ideas on how to incorporate it into your classroom. If you are a historian, archaeologist, museum curator, or otherwise involved in the social science consider contributing an article or multimedia content. Additionally, Smarthistory contributes videos to Google Art Project.

A Democracy of Images – Smithsonian Online Exhibit

Smithsonian_InstituteCheck out the Smithsonian’s online exhibit “A Democracy of Images.” Here is the Smithsonian explanation of the exhibit:

The photographs presented here are selected from the approximately 7,000 images collected since the museum’s photography program began thirty years ago, in 1983. Ranging from daguerreotype to digital, they depict the American experience and are loosely grouped around four ideas: American Characters, Spiritual Frontier, America Inhabited, and Imagination at Work.

The title A Democracy of Images refers to Walt Whitman’s belief that photography was a quintessentially American activity, rooted in everyday people and ordinary things and presented in a straightforward way. Known as the “poet of democracy,” Whitman wrote after visiting a daguerreotype studio in 1846: “You will see more lifethere—more variety, more human nature, more artistic beauty. . . than in any spot we know.” At the time of Whitman’s death, in 1892, George Eastman had just introduced mass market photography when he put an affordable box camera into the hands of thousands of Americans. The ability to capture an instant of lasting importance and fundamental truth mesmerized Americans then and continues to inspire photographers working today.

The online exhibit allows you to browse, search, and further explore the exhibit. It’s a great resource for those interested in American history and Art History.

San Francisco 49er Vern Davis is Art Gallery Owner

SuperBowl_GameCenter_300x250Super Bowl XLVII is this weekend and features my team, the San Francisco 49ers, and the Baltimore Ravens. Go Niners! On a note related to my blog, 49ers tight end Vernon Davis has recently added a new position to his resume: Gallery Owner. He recently opened a gallery in San Jose called Gallery 85. The gallery will feature Davis’ own art as well as pieces from new artists. While I’m not sure of Davis’ artistic skills, this is one Niner girl that will support it nonetheless.

To learn more about the gallery, see the article at the LA Times.