Category Archives: Women’s History

iTunes Resources for Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month and here is a great repository of resources via iTunes. You will find iTunes U courses, podcasts, books, apps, and more.

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Free Technology for Teachers: Explore the World with the Google Cultural Institute

This is reblogged from my post on Free Technology for Teachers

I am a big fan of the Google Cultural Institute; it’s an amazing repository of Artistic Masterpieces, Wonders of the Natural World, Historical Artifacts, and more. By using it as a repository of digital materials, it’s an easy way to access cultural content from around the world in my classroom. I can pull up a high definition image of Van Gogh’s Starry Night and use its powerful zoom features so that students can see the impasto brush strokes. We can explore the Street Art of Sao Paulo with a Google Street View for a unit on modern art or the Ruins at Angkor Wat

Free Technology for Teachers: Explore the World with the Google Cultural Institute.

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Free Library of Congress eBooks for students

These are great resources!

History Tech

As more and more schools are moving away from paper textbooks and materials, teachers are working to answer the obvious question:

where can I find digital resources appropriate for kids?

If you and your building is using Mac computers or IOS devices such as iPads or iPods, at least part of the answer is the Library of Congress. The folks over there recently released six free iBooks that can be quickly downloaded and are perfect for having students interact with primary source evidence.

The Student Discovery Sets bring together historical artifacts and one-of-a-kind documents on a wide range of topics, from history to science to literature. Based on the Library’s Primary Source Sets, these new iBooks have built-in interactive tools that let students zoom in, draw to highlight details, and conduct open-ended primary source analysis.

(Aren’t an Apple school? The LOC is still an awesome place to find online…

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Library of Congress – Resources for Women’s History Month

 

Suffragettes picketing c/o Wikimedia Commons

Suffragettes picketing c/o Wikimedia Commons

The Library of Congress has a series of resources for teachers that are specific to teaching Women’s History Month. The robust online resources provide a variety of primary sources, activities, lesson plans, and more that can help you bring the alive women’s history from the beginnings of our country through modern times and politics.

If you would like to view the robust library of resources, you may do so here.

Literary Landmarks: A History of American Women Writers | Women’s History Month | Smithsonian Magazine

 

Literary historian and scholar Elaine Showalter has recently published a sweeping and insightful survey of American women writers, A Jury of Her Peers: American Women Writers from Anne Bradstreet to Annie Proulx (Knopf). She is the first person to attempt this all-encompassing project.

 

Why do you think that no one before you has attempted to write a literary history of American women writers?

 

There really wasn’t a sense until the late 1970s or even the 1980s that women writers actually had a history and that it was something worth investigating…

Literary Landmarks: A History of American Women Writers | Women’s History Month | Smithsonian Magazine.

Smithsonian Exhibit: The National Woman Suffrage Parade, 1913

Beginning this month, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History will host an exhibit on the 1913 National Woman Suffrage Parade.

On March 3, 1913, 5,000 women marched up Pennsylvania Avenue demanding the right to vote. Their “national procession,” staged the day before Woodrow Wilson’s presidential inauguration, was the first civil rights parade to use the nation’s capital as a backdrop, underscoring the national importance of their cause and women’s identity as American citizens. The event brought women from around the country to Washington in a show of strength and determination to obtain the ballot. The extravagant parade–and the near riot that almost destroyed it–kept woman suffrage in the newspapers for weeks. This 30-foot long showcase display recreates the mood of the parade and illustrates its impact using costumes worn by participants along with banners, sashes, postcards, letters and photographs.

If you cannot make it to Washington D.C. and want to look at some of the high resolution images, be sure to check out the exhibit online.

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First Ladies of Fashion – Library of Congress

obamadress2While her husband may be leader of the free world, all eyes were on Michelle Obama during the President’s inauguration. While the President’s speech discussed controversial and topical subjects (like climate change and gay marriage), the press was a twitter (literally) with the First Lady’s fashion choices.

Michelle is not the first Presidential Wife to be viewed as a fashion icon. From as early as Dolley Madison, the public looked to the First Lady as a force majeure in ladies fashion. In honor of the trend of fashionable first ladies, the Library of Congress has published its: “First Ladies of Fashion.”