Category Archives: Museums

View & Access over 6,000 Photochrom Prints from the Library of Congress

The Library of Congress has published its collection of more than 6,000 photochrom pictures from the turn of the 20th century. The collection includes images from Europe, Asia, and North America from the 1890’s-1910.

You can view and access the collection here.

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Detroit Photographic Co. Chicago River elevators. ca. 1900. Image. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2008679501/. (Accessed November 15, 2016.)

How to enhance your lessons with Google Art Project

This is reblogged from my post on Daily Genius.

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Google Art Project is one of my favorite tools available online. It is a repository of high resolution images and 3D “museum view” virtual art gallery tours. Since its inception in 2011, Google Art Project has grown from its initial collaboration of 17 international museums to more than 151 and is now available in 18 languages.

This is a great tool for introducing students to Art from around the world. Here are a few ideas for lesson plans that you can use in conjunction with Google Art Project.

CREATE & CURATE A GALLERY

Google Art Project will allow you to create and curate your own gallery. You can have students build a project thematically (styles, emotional experiences, etc), chronologically, culturally, and more. Students select the pieces that they want to add to their gallery, move them around (just as a museum curators places art pieces in an exhibit), and then share them privately or publicly. This could be a great way for a student to showcase their understanding of a particular artist or style as a project for an Art History, History, Social Studies, or Humanities course.

COMPARE WORKS OF ART SIDE BY SIDE

Using the “Compare” model, you can put two works of art side by side and perform an in depth analysis of the works. Here is one of my favorite exercises:

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You will see that I have selected A Sunday on La Grande Jatte by Seurat (Chicago Institute of Art) andBreakfast by Signac (Kröller-Müller Museum); both of these artists were masters of pointillism. I have students examine the pieces in high definition, side-by-side, and explore the different techniques between these two artists.

Students write up their comparative analysis in their Art History notebook and present on the stylistic differences in class. This can also help students understand how styles and techniques evolve over time (Seurat and Signac developed pointillism out of the styles of impressionism). You can assign specific works of art to students (like I do above) or you can have students choose and compare pieces on their own.

This is a great way to teach students to engage the content in depth and perform comparative analysis.

STUDENTS STUDY & “FORGE” THE MASTERS

A common practice in Art courses is to study the work of master artists by reproducing their work. A fun way to do this is to ask students to “create a forgery.”

Students could select an artist and study their life, style, work, and technique; the high definition, zoomable figures on Google Art Project allows them to study numerous works of art that are held in collections around the world. After they have done this, ask them to create a fake!

They can host a gallery opening where visitors compare their reproduction to the original works of the artist.

PARTICIPATE IN AN ART TALK

Google hosts regular Hangouts on Air with prominent curators. They announce the schedule on theirGoogle+ page and post the recordings on theirYouTube page. Students can prepare for the announced topic and submit questions to professionals. It’s a great way to engage students with modern Art curation.

Google has also posted some different lesson ideashere. With more and more expansions to the Google Art Project (the most recent being its Street Art Collection), there will be more opportunities for students to explore the world of Art.

This resource continues to grow and provides students with the ability to explore art in new and interesting ways, outside of a textbook, or more in-depth than they could at a museum.

LEARN MORE ABOUT BRINGING GOOGLE INTO YOUR CLASSROOM!

google art project

  • Google & Web Tools in the Student-Centered Classroom
  • Google & Chromebooks
  • The Chromebook Classroom
  • And More!

View the Full Course Catalog at ettsummer.org

Free Art History Education in your Inbox

Artips is a free daily newsletter focused on art history. Delivered to subscribers’ inbox 3 times a week, Artips tells short and original stories about famous and unknown works of art.

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Founded in April 2013, Artips is a start-up founded by two young college graduates, Coline Debayle and Jean Perret. They decided to create a way to address difficulties many individuals face when trying to understand the arts, such as the art world’s complex nature, outdated art history texts and long lines outside major museums across the world.

Artips makes art history more accessible and mobile by offering daily enter- taining and unique stories that take only a minute to read. With its advanced and responsive design, Artips can be read on a smartphone, tablet or computer.

As an Artips subscriber, you will learn the answers to the following questions: Why did Michelangelo sign his Pietà like a thief in the night? Why does the barmaid of Folies- Bergères look so melancholy in Manet’s painting? What were the eerie premonitions of Surrealists like Dali or Brauner? From ancient to contemporary art, Artips allows us to understand works of art from a new angle.

Through the writings of over one hundred specialists, editors, students, art hobbyists and art history teachers, Artips tells a memorable and fun story every day about paintings, sculptures, installations, photography and design.

As of this month, there are over 80,000 francophone subscribers and we have launched our English version earlier this month.

To subscribe to Artips for free, visit their website artips.co.

Free Technology for Teachers: Explore the World with the Google Cultural Institute

This is reblogged from my post on Free Technology for Teachers

I am a big fan of the Google Cultural Institute; it’s an amazing repository of Artistic Masterpieces, Wonders of the Natural World, Historical Artifacts, and more. By using it as a repository of digital materials, it’s an easy way to access cultural content from around the world in my classroom. I can pull up a high definition image of Van Gogh’s Starry Night and use its powerful zoom features so that students can see the impasto brush strokes. We can explore the Street Art of Sao Paulo with a Google Street View for a unit on modern art or the Ruins at Angkor Wat

Free Technology for Teachers: Explore the World with the Google Cultural Institute.

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Rome 320 AD – Interactive App

My good friend and former Professor, Bernie Frischer, Ph.D., just announced a game that resulted from his collaboration: Rome 320AD. You can see Bernie giving a brief overview of 4th century Rome in this Kahn Academy Video.

The app follows the lives of four Romans as they travel through the city on a summer day in 320 CE. You can explore 3D, interactive models of the city in high resolution and detail.

The app is currently available in the Mac App Store ($5.99) and the Chrome Web Store ($6.99). iPad and Android Apps are in the making!

National Archives Making Thousands of Images Available via Wikimedia Commons

Adams_Boulder_Dam_1942The National Archives has uploaded thousands of images to Wikimedia Commons, making them available free of charge to the general public. 

“By uploading digital content there, we make it readily available for Wikipedia editors to embed in Wikipedia articles, making them far more visible than they are in our own catalog,” said Dominic McDevitt-Parks, digital content specialist and Wikipedian in Residence at NARA.

They intend to make thousands of more images available in the near future. You can read more about their collaboration here

Creative Commons and Cultural Heritage

These are some great thoughts about presenting cultural documents and artifacts to the public and how they should be licensed. Interesting ethical questions and dialogue.

Archaeology, Museums & Outreach

Java PrintingI am very pleased to present a post and resource links on Creative Commons by my colleague Jason Baird Jackson.  More and more cultural heritage professionals and students are faced with questions about how to best present original documents for public access and the proper citation and use of internet files.  Jason provides a solid introduction and valuable links to Creative Commons licenses that are relevant today and will be increasingly important in the immediate future.

Creative Commons and Cultural Heritage

by Jason Baird Jackson

Do public archaeologists, heritage professionals, museum practitioners, and graduate students need to know about the Creative Commons? I think so. Robert Connolly does so as well, which is why he thought to ask me to contribute a short note to his blog. After you have learned a bit about it, I hope that you too will see the relevance of the tools provided by the…

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