Category Archives: Google

Digital Privacy is a Civil Right

There has been a lot of talk in the news about the weaponization of social media. What is often not discussed in these arguments is the interconnectedness of social media and digital, data privacy. While a great deal of attention has been paid to hacked and/or misused information (such as the Cambridge Analytica fiasco), the issues with digital privacy are much deeper than the lack of accountability by Facebook or Twitter.

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Even with all of the ink (digital and analogue) spilt on the topic, most individuals do not understand what data privacy is, why it’s important, or how it is used. The reality is that laws and regulations have not kept up with the rapid influx of computing devices and interconnected experiences in the world. As such, our information is out there – available to the world in never before seen ways, with unprecedented access and consequences. And social media (where some people argue you offer up your information freely) is not the sole bastion of privacy invasion. Internet search histories in your own home, household shopping tied to rewards or even credit cards, email exchanges, browser history, even parking data all fall into this realm of unprotected data privacy. Even more disturbing is that many of us (and our children) have smartphones which have become a portable GPS, telling our apps (and whoever they grant access to) a history of our daily travels.

Because we have virtually no regulations on how these firms collect, use, and share our data, digital privacy has become practically non-existent in the United States. The consequences for this are quite dire. For example, because we have no data privacy, it has given hostile, foreign governments an insight into our collective psyche and an avenue to sew greater decent. While Russian election meddling news coverage largely focused on conservative and right wing voters, the Russian governments insidious methods also focused on people of color. A report recently issued to the United States senate reported that Russian bots specifically targeted African Americans on Facebook and Twitter; the likely result was lower voter turnout and stoking of racial tensions and divisions in the United States.

Congress has failed to educate itself on how the internet and computing tools work, highlighted in their interviews of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and Google CEO Sundar Pichai. While coverage (and internet memes) focused on how clueless law makers are about “how the internet and technology work,” the real concern here should be how little congress has invested in learning about these tools and thus instituting effective protections for their constituents.

While there has been some focus on data privacy, the small and attainable semblances of it are still reserved for those who can pay. Tim Cook, CEO of Apple, was lauded for his speech in Brussels in which he lambasted his fellow Silicon Valley technologists for their lack of concern over privacy and highlighted that Apple does not participate in data mining and distribution. However, Apple products cost a premium for their users (often 20-30% above their competitors), reserving Apples protections for those who can afford to pay.

This is not the bastion of only online tools and hardware. In my city of Miami, the Miami Parking Authority has just announced that they will be raising parking rates for non Miami-Dade residents starting January 1. Residents will receive a discount if they register with the Park Mobile app. While this may seem benign, a little digging demonstrates that the only individuals able to register with the park mobile app must have a smartphone and a debit or credit card, meaning that it will cost a premium for the county’s poorest residents. Additionally, Park Mobile is not a government app. Rather, it is owned and operated by the BMW Group (the largest car manufacturer  in the world). This means that unless users are okay with handing over their name, address, license plate number (tied to their vehicle), and credit card along with their data privacy for where they go and where they park (along with geo-location which is enabled on the app) to a for-profit car manufacturer, they will also pay 20% or more for parking in the city of Miami.

The reality is, we live in a hybrid, digital-analogue world and these services are no longer “optional” for operating in it. Going without a smartphone and/or internet use is akin to “dropping of the grid” and makes day to day activities such as: getting work done, parking, depositing checks, and other routine actions all the more difficult, time consuming, and more expensive (or even impossible). Data privacy is more crucial than ever. We cannot rely on these companies to regulate themselves. In fact, they have proven that they will spend millions of dollars to prevent just that. The New York Times did an amazing (and disturbing) expose on Facebook’s role in Russian interference in the 2016 election and its ongoing attempts to cover up their own culpability.

While the United States has been slow to act, other than with some limitedly enforced laws relating to children’s data (see COPPA and FERPA), Europe has started to address this issue with a heavy hand. The much publicized GDPR initiative in the EU has removed the physical barriers tied to data lies and recognizes that data storage and transition operates on a global scale. It allows users to better manage their online privacy. The United States, however, has been slow to regulate and adopt. This has in part has been hampered by a lack of understanding of this issue on Capital Hill coupled with powerful lobbying by digital giants such as Facebook and Google. However, we need to do more. This issue will continue to expand and creep into our lives until it is omnipresent. If our representatives won’t address data privacy, then we as constituents must force their hands. California passed a sweeping digital privacy law just this year, it is time for other states and lawmakers to follow suit. Digital privacy is not a partisan issue, it’s an American one.

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Edutopia’s New Resources on Digital Citizenship

Digital Citizenship is always a hot topic with both educators and their schools. I have long been critical of the “stranger danger” focus of most digital citizenhsip curricula. This focus has over-exaggerated the risks of online predators and misinformed a generation of children and their parents, often with detrimental effects.

I was so happy to see Edutopia’s updated curriculum and guidelines, What Your Students Really Need to Know about Digital Citizenship, crafted by the esteemed educator Vicki Davis. It focuses on students created robust passwords (that they don’t share with others), not posting private information, not sharing without permission, the idea of media ownership, and more.

With this ideas coupled with Common Sense Media’s curriculum or the new one introduced by Google, you will be well prepared to help your students be successful online.

Google’s Monopoly & Your Privacy

When it comes to data privacy, what concerns me most of all is how much data is being collected without our knowledge. While many users understand that by entering their information into Facebook or other Social Media profile makes it public, many do not know that every internet search or email sent adds to the data mining pot. This is a great infographic, covering just the tip of the iceberg about what Google knows about you.

3 Ways for Students to Create with Devices in the Classroom

Devices have become omnipresent in our classrooms. Often, these tools are used as expensive, electronic content delivery systems. However, the real power in technology in schools is that it empowers students to become content creators. Smartphones and tablets, even more so, have allowed them to become mobile and agile ones. Most educators know that individuals learn far more about a topic when they must explain it to someone else. Additionally, by employing multiple learning modalities through the creative process (tactile, kinesthetic, visible, etc), students process material more thoroughly. As you think about your lesson plans in the future, consider empowering students to create rather than just consume. Here are a few ways to do just that.

Create a Video

I am a fan of giving students guiding questions and parameters, then having them make an educational video. In my documentaries project, students must answer address a specific topic (e.g. “Where did George Washington get his reputation for honesty?” or “Was Benedict Arnold solely a villain of the Revolutionary War?”). We talk about creating

content in an engaging way, incorporating images and videos effectively (and ethically), pacing content, and selecting what to include or leave out. Videos are not exclusive to the humanities. I have seen math teachers effectively use them by having students demonstrate how to solve complex problems and science teachers as a recording and reflection for labs. I also encourage students to post their videos publicly (when age appropriate) or to the class via a closed portal (for younger students). By posting their videos publicly and sharing with the class, they are presenting to an authentic audience. Making a video is easy and can by done with a smartphone, tablet, and/or computer. Free software options include iMovie (MacOS & iOS), Movie Maker (Windows), and FilmoraGo (iOS & Android).

Create a Podcast

Podcasts are become ever more popular. There are podcasts to cover news, popular entertainment, hobbies, sports, cultural phenomena, and more. Task your class with

creating a podcast on a topic relevant to your course. If you are a Social Studies teacher, perhaps a weekly podcast on current events. If you teach science, a weekly science report relevant to the topic. Math? Try incorporating an update on a complex topic students are tackling that week. Podcasting can help students work on their public speaking skills as well as how to effectively present to an audience. Again, by sharing the podcast with the public at large or just the class and/or school, students learn what it is to engage with a broader audience. Podcasting can be done easily with a smartphone, tablet, and/or computer paired with a simple microphone to drown out ambient sound (the microphone on headphones can work in a pinch or you can invest in something a little more substantive). My favorite free apps for podcasting include: Garageband (MacOS & iOS) and Audacity (MacOS & Windows).

Websites

My students complete a year long research project that they post on a comprehensive website. Through creating an online portal, they learn how to write effectively for a broad audience, how to cite material so that it is accessible online, how to create and incorporate various types of media, and how to effectively organize and lay-out content. What I especially like about website creation is that it allows students to combine skills that they have learned throughout the year (e.g. video and podcasting). We have all seen “good” and “bad” websites. When it’s published online, students want theirs to look good. As such, it also serves as a basic primer in basic graphic design. There are numerous free website tools out there. If your school is a G-Suite for Education school, then I highly recommend using the new Google Sites. Not only is it easy to use, but it readily allows for collaboration. You can also check out weebly or wix.

If you’re in a school where students have access to devices, I strongly encourage having them turn those devices into content creators. You will find that it empowers them as learners and makes their learning more applicable and deep.

5 Free #EdTech Tools to Check out for Back to School

The start of school is just around the corner! Many educators are brushing off old lesson plans for revision or restructuring their curriculum. As you prepare for the start of school, here are five ed tech tools to check out to help get your lesson planning game on point.

Google Classroom

Google Classroom has become the go-to tool for educators to assign and collect

assignments, disseminate information, and even to keep parents informed. With some new, robust updates (better ways to navigate individual student work, transfer classes, team teach, and third party integration to name a few), it’s time to up your Classroom game. By using Google Classroom, you can easily keep student work in one place; no more emails entitled “homework” from personal emails you don’t recognize (e.g. “swimlover02@email.com”). Remember that Classroom is free and available to all (even if your school is not a G-Suite for Education institution). It really is worth a look!

Remind

Email is dead, it’s all about texting. In spite of this, our primary means of communication with students and parents remains email. Most teachers move around this by simply sharing their personal cell number and collecting them from students. Of course, this can be a real hindrance on privacy and can lead to concerns about appropriate boundaries. This is where Remind comes in. If your school is anything like mine, it’s fast moving and constantly changing. Remind is a great way to text students and parents important information (e.g. “due to snow day, test moved to Friday” or “Field-trip departure moved to side gate”). This does not require teachers, students, or parents to share their personal cell phone numbers. It also keeps a record of all texts that a teacher sends out. Privacy and boundaries protected!

Socrative

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Socrative by MasteryConnect https://www.socrative.com/

Socrative has long been a favorite of educators. It’s a way to conduct reviews, run bell ringer or exit ticket activities, and otherwise gamify your classroom. Socrative has gone through several iterations. In addition to their free service, they now offer a “Pro” version ($59.99/year) that allows you to take your Socrative game to the next level. My students always enjoy days where we engage in Socrative activities; it allows them to show off what they know and tackle what they need to learn.

Quizlet

Now, you may be surprised to learn that I advocate a flashcard system. However, rote memorization still has a place in education. Whether you’re teaching geography, vocabulary, spelling, physics terms, or more, there will always be a place for flashcards. Quizlet has really become more robust than ever before. There are a number of ways to use Quizlet in your classroom. You can create sets yourself and share with your class in advance. Students can collaborate on sets. Quizlet now even lets you use your sets to engage in creative games (not just flashcards or matching).

Twitter

Twitter remains the go-to social network for teachers. If you are a Twitter user, it’s time to rejoin your chats and check out what your PLN is up to. If Twitter has been on your “To-Do” list, now is a great time to start! Check out my articles: “Effective Ways for Educators to Use Twitter” and “5 Ways for Teachers to Get Started on Twitter.” If you need to expand your “follow” list, here are some Great Educators & Institutions to Follow.

These are just 5 (Free) resources. There are many more. Please share your favorite in the comment section below!

Suggested Edits – My Favorite Tool in Google Docs

Suggested Edits MenuIf you assign writing assignments to your students, then be sure to learn how to use “suggested edits.” Suggested edits is similar to “track changes” in Microsoft Word. To turn it on, simply click on the Pencil (with the words “editing” next to it) and select “suggesting.” The menu will turn from grey to green.

Now, when you make changes to a document, they will show up as “suggestions” rather than direct edits. Users can even write notes to one another on the “suggestions” comments. This is a great way for multiple users to edit the same document or for students to do a peer editing exercise.

Suggested Edits

How & Why Educators Should Use Revision History in Google Docs

Revision History

One of my favorite features in G-Suite tools is “Revision History.” This features allows you to see what changes were made, when, and by whom. It’s a powerful tool, especially in education. If you have never accessed the revision history, you can do so (so long as you have “editing” rights on a document) by going to File –> See Revision History.

This brings up a pane on the right hand side that allows you to see what contributors edited the document and when. If you select their names, it will highlight their changes in the marked color. It’s a pretty cool feature! There are numerous reasons why and educator would want to use Revision History in the classroom.

Ensure that Collaborative Projects are Collaborative

Group assignments are common in the classroom. However, it’s not uncommon for a group assignment to be monopolized by one or two students (either out of necessity or willfulness). By using revision history, you can ensure that group members are all participating in an assignment.

Restore a Previous Version

A student may inadvertently delete a section of an assignment or a contribution. One of my favorite features of revision history is that you can restore a previous version. Just find the draft that you want and click “restore this version.”

Ensure that Daily Assignments are Completed… Daily

A lot of teachers assign work that is due daily but checked sporadically. For example, English teachers often require that students keep a daily or weekly diary, social studies teachers ask for students to reflect on assignments, or science teachers require daily recordings of experiment results. The revision history can tell you when something was added to a Google Doc.

Watch the Evolution of a Student’s Writing

When I assign a writing assignment, there are several iterations and revisions. By using the revision history, I don’t need to worry that a hard rough draft is lost or damaged in a student’s backpack or locker. Instead, I can watch the evolution of a student’s writing over several days, weeks, or months. This a powerful tool when teaching writing.

Facilitate Peer Review

If you encourage peer review, revision history can help you to see the feedback and suggestions that students make on one another’s work. This way, you can ensure that they are reading and meaningfully providing feedback.

There are many other ways to apply revision history, but these 5 are a great way to get started with the feature in your classroom.