Category Archives: Google

How to Use Google’s Data Gif Maker in the Classroom

Google just announced a new tool, primarily aimed at journalists, a data gif maker. This is a great tool for students to use in the classroom as it allows for a new way to convey information (specifically change over time) visually. Check out how to create data gifs on google’s blog.

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3 Ways Schools can Help Users to Protect their Accounts from Malware, Phishing, & Cyber-scams.

Recently, G-Suite users were hit by a large phishing scam. Users were sent an email that appeared to be from Google and asked to click on a document for collaboration. The

nefarious document then gave the sender access to your whole account, including your directory, enabling it to spread. While phishing is nothing new, it has become more problematic and sophisticated. As such, it’s especially important to include some cyber-security basics as soon as students start to have access to digital tools.

Identify Scams

Most scams are pretty easy to identify. You are sent a typo laden email from someone you don’t know asking you to “check this out.” However, as email spoofing becomes more prominent, it’s important to not just open an attachment even if you know the user. There are a few red flags: the email is full of typos and errors, it doesn’t fit the tone of the sender (e.g. would your teacher be sending an email that says “check this out!”), or it just doesn’t feel right.

Keep your Operating System & Security Software Up to Date

Yes, updates can be annoying – they take a long time and may require a hardware restart in the middle of the day. However, keep your operating system and security software up to date is essential to cyber-security. While you may not want to update to the latest Windows or iOS software on day 1 (a brand new OS may have a bug or two, as early iOS 10 adopters learned when it bricked several phones), you should do so shortly after the release. Critical security updates should be installed regularly as they plug security holes and fix exploitable bugs.

Enable Two Factor Authentication

Two factor authentication is a security measure that grants you access to your account or device only after you have presented two methods of authentication (e.g. your account password and a code texted to your phone or sent to an email). It has been around for a while, but many users never enable it. Two Factor Authentication may feel like a pain, but it is the best possible defense against potential hackers or nefarious users. If you have ever been locked out of your account because another user has gained access, you know how difficult it can be to regain access and the damage that can be done to your reputation or your pocket book. Enable two factor authentication on all of your sensitive accounts (bank accounts, email, social media, etc). The extra 30 seconds it takes to log in will be worth it!

These are just a few ways that students can protect their devices and accounts from malware, phishing, and cyber-scams. However, as cyber attacks become more sophisticated, network administrators and users must become more savvy. It’s important to keep up your skills and consistently train your community. I encourage administrators to attend cyber-security webinars and workshops, such as ATLIS’s Cyber-Security Workshop in Chicago this summer.

3 Ways to Use Google Classroom Outside of the Classroom!

Google Classroom is finally available – outside of the classroom! Previously, you could only use Google Classroom if you were a G-Suite for Education user and within your own domain. This new flexibility provides some great opportunities for use outside of your own classroom. Here are NUMBER ideas of how you can use Google Classroom, outside of the classroom.

Disseminating & Collecting Data from Organizations you Lead

Google Classroom

Courtesy of Google Blog

Whether you’re an educational technology specialist, a topic specialist, or head up a cos-play group, Google Classroom can be a great way to organize and collect information. For example, if you head up the Parents Organization of your children’s school, you can use Google Classroom to disseminate the updated bylaws for review, comment, and/or edit. If you are leading a professional development workshop on AP Spanish, you can collect videos or written documents using Google Classroom’s “assignments” feature.

Organizing Groups & Consortia

If you lead an educational consortium (e.g. AP Chinese Teachers or Educational Technology), Google Classroom is a great and easy way to create a closed system for discussion and collaboration. This is a great way to collaborate with professionals at other institutions or organizations.

Organizing & Collaborating on Projects with Disparate Contributors

You don’t have to be a teacher to appreciate the power of collaboration. If you are working on a project that requires you to engage users throughout the community, then Google Classroom is a great way to bring it all together. For example, if you are organizing a charity walk, you can use Google Classroom to seek feedback on your marketing (sharing posters and flyers for review, edit, and/or comment), collect multi-media resources that you have delegated to other volunteers, and engage in asynchronous discussions in a walled group.

There are numerous ways to use Google Classroom outside of the classroom. Anytime that you need to readily organize a community, disseminate or collect media, or create a walled community, it’s a great resource to explore!

4 Take Aways from ATLIS 2017

ATLIS logo.pngI returned from ATLIS 2017 last Wednesday invigorated and, to be honest, a little exhausted. It wasn’t just the time change (although that was a challenge in and of itself). Rather, it was from participating in so many robust and deep conversations with my peers, taking part in various presentations and workshops, and the depth and breadth of the conference in its entirety. I’ve taken a few days to reflect on the conference experience (one of the key tenants of the ATLIS mission). Here are some of the key take-aways I had as both a Tech Director and an Educator.

Coding & Computer Science are More Vital Than Ever

Coding and Computer Science have been primary topics in education for the past few decades. However, the significance of coding has become even more vital. Jaime Casap, Chief Education Evangelist at Google, kicked off the conference with a humorous but compelling keynote where he highlighted the need for young people to learn both Computer Science and Coding. Computer Science jobs are still both high in demand and well paying. He was also sure to point out that children can often learn coding on their own (with the self-directed software today). However, we as educators must prioritize the role of Computer Science (and not just of the AP kind) in becoming central to our educational priorities. This concept was further driven home in various sessions.

Doug Kiang of the Punahou School and Mary Radlhammer Kiang of St Andrew’s Priory led a deep dive session on Teaching Coding for the Non-Coding teacher.

Using some key techniques and incorporating games, they demonstrated how even non-coders (like myself) can incorporate coding into their curriculum.

Justin Curtis of the Bryn Mawr School discussed the challenges and rewards of building a robust K-12 Computer Science curriculum (still a rarity in the country that built the first home computers and developed the internet).

All of these hammered home to me that we need more computer science and coding in schools in the whole curriculum, not just a one off course in the Middle or High School.

Cyber-Security is More Important than Ever

With the rise of hacking and ransom-ware, institutions need to be more savvy about how they protect their systems and educate their community. Hospitals remain the number 1 target for attacks. However, schools (especially independent schools) are quickly catching up. As they are repositories of information (social security numbers, credit cards, names and address, etc), schools need to be especially vigilant about the security of their systems.

Denise Musselwhite of Trinity Preparatory School and Jamie Britto of Collegiate School led a deep dive into Cyber-security and Independent Schools. This was a robust look into security policies (like two factory authentication), training sessions, and phishing tests. It’s a precursor to their two day cyber-security workshop in Chicago this summer.

In addition to Denise and Jaime, other presenters led sessions on security, highlighting that cyber security and systems are a key element for Technology Directors around the country. Building systems and keeping them secure is an ongoing struggle as every upgrade brings new vulnerabilities and every day brings new potential attacks.

Equity in Education & Tech

Equity was a prominent topic this year. While equity is often on the forefront of public education, it is a concern for independent schools as well. What made this conversation unique, however, is that it was not just about equity for students, but for administrators as well.

As a woman in technology and education, I was especially struck by Renee Hawkins of Garrison Forrest and Jeff Dayton of Madeira School in their session on “What do Girls see in IT?”

Information Technology is a community within a school that can staffed entirely by men, even when many EdTech faculty are women. Disturbingly, the percentage of computing occupations held by women has been declining since 1991, while women who do enter the profession quit at a rate double that for men. What can schools do to counter the message that IT jobs such as network and systems administration are nearly exclusively masculine?

When I popped into this overflowing session room, I walked into a robust discussion about the role of women in technology and leadership. As someone who has solely operated in co-educational institutions, it was especially striking how male-dominated technology departments are – even in all-girls schools. How does that impact the next generation of young women and men?

In addition to gender, there were several sessions about equity and access. For example, Margie Llines and Rurik Nackerud tackled Equity in BYOD. Many schools with even the most robust scholarship and needs programs still do not include technology and access as a part of those packages! This is especially concerning when a school has a mandated BYOD program. I touched on this issue in my own blog post “Growing Number of Poor Americans are Phone Only Internet Users – What does that Mean for Education?

It is (or should be) About the Kids

The kind of Tech Directors you find at ATLIS are a little unique. We are the Tech Directors that don’t demand “lock it down” systems… in fact, we often rebel against them. ATLIS Tech Directors focus on what is ultimately best for the kids and education. It is always great and refreshing to see that be the focus once again. Whether it’s talking about coding and computer science, how to set up devices, equity and access, or how to support faculty, the center of the conversation was always “what is best for the kids and education?”

As an ATLIS Board Member, I am always excited to watch it grow and evolve. This year, the conference blew me away. I’m excited for the coming year as we develop more robust professional development opportunities, publish our first academic journal, and take technology at independent schools to the next level.

Google Cultural Institute – Famous People

search fieldsIf you haven’t been to Google Arts & Culture lately (previously Google Art Project), then check out some of the new features. I recently discovered that you can organize and search by: Historical events, Historical figures, and Places. As a history and social studies teacher, this is a great feature. For example, if I’m teaching Ancient History, I can do a search for Alexander the Great and pull up a series of images, maps, quotes, and more that are in the Google Arts & Culture database. Likewise, I can search for his famous victory during the Battle of Issus and pull up corresponding works of art. It’s a great tool to explore visual resources on various topics.

G-Suite Learning Center is Better than Ever!

I am regularly helping people become more acclimated with Google tools. Recently, I went back over to the G-Suite Learning Center and was amazed at its complete overhaul, robust features, and ease of access and use. The new learning center focuses not only on teaching users about its tools, but helping them to migrate from common platforms such as Exchange. Information is organized in a variety of ways: tool, tips and tricks, switching from Microsoft, and (my favorite) use at work.

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If you’re responsible for training people on G-Suite, this is a great resource for you. For example, if you want to do a training on GMail, select the “GMail” option under “Learn by Product.” You will find a variety of useful instructions, including the “Cheat Sheet” which includes instructions for performing basic functions in GMail.

Perhaps the best feature of these resources is that it updates when Google Updates. No more scrambling to create new training resources after the release of a new feature or, worse yet, an updated look! Everything you need is in G-Suite Training.

Google’s Team Drives are a Great Tool for Project Based Learning

A few months ago, Google began testing a new feature in its Enterprise suite – Team Drives.

 

Google Team Drives are shared spaces where teams can easily store, search, and access their files anywhere, from any device. Unlike files in My Drive, files in Team Drive belong to the team instead of an individual. Even if members leave, the files stay exactly where they are so your team can continue to share information and get work done.

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Courtesy of G-Suite Learning Center

If you are incorporating more project based learning into your classroom, Team Drives are a great way for students to collaborate and share, especially on robust projects. In addition to creating content, they can use it to store materials, bibliographies, media, and more. Additionally, as everyone in the group “owns” the product, you don’t run into a problem when one of them tries to submit content via Google Classroom.

To learn more about Team Drives in G-Suite, click here. If you do not yet see it as an option for your G-Suite account, contact your administrator.