Tag Archives: Culture

Creative Commons and Cultural Heritage

These are some great thoughts about presenting cultural documents and artifacts to the public and how they should be licensed. Interesting ethical questions and dialogue.

Other Voices

Java PrintingI am very pleased to present a post and resource links on Creative Commons by my colleague Jason Baird Jackson.  More and more cultural heritage professionals and students are faced with questions about how to best present original documents for public access and the proper citation and use of internet files.  Jason provides a solid introduction and valuable links to Creative Commons licenses that are relevant today and will be increasingly important in the immediate future.

Creative Commons and Cultural Heritage

by Jason Baird Jackson

Do public archaeologists, heritage professionals, museum practitioners, and graduate students need to know about the Creative Commons? I think so. Robert Connolly does so as well, which is why he thought to ask me to contribute a short note to his blog. After you have learned a bit about it, I hope that you too will see the relevance of the tools provided by the…

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Into the Cave of Chile’s Witches | Past Imperfect

Brujos-maybeThere is a place in South America that was once the end of the earth. It lies close to the 41st parallel, where the Maule River empties into the Pacific Ocean, and in the first years of the 16th century it marked the spot at which the Empire of the Incas ended and a strange and unknown world began.

South of the Maule, the Incas thought, lay a land of mystery and darkness. It was a place where the Pacific’s waters chilled and turned from blue to black, and where indigenous peoples struggled to claw the basest of livings from a hostile environment. It was also where the witches lived and evil came from. The Incas called this land “the Place of Seagulls.”…

Into the Cave of Chile’s Witches | Past Imperfect.

Chimpanzees Can Display Altruism

New recent on the behavior of chimpanzees demonstrates that our closest living relatives do in fact display altruistic behavior. Previously, primatologists believed that chimpanzees solely demonstrated behavior for self-serving ends. However, recent behavioral models have shown that the great apes take into account the feelings and needs of others in the group.

 “All studies with wild chimpanzees have amply documented that they share meat and other food abundantly, that they help one another in highly risky situations, like when facing predators or neighboring communities, and adopt needing orphans.” — Christopher Boesche to Discovery News.

These findings also shed an interesting light on the existence and development of altruistic behaviors amongst humans and the role it played in our evolutionary and social progression. To learn more about these findings and the future of these research models, see this article in Discovery News or at MSNBC.