Tag Archives: Digital

Lesson Plan for Teaching Kids to Spot Fake News

Fake News is the phrase du jour. The reality is that misinformation propagates social media (especially Facebook). With the proliferation of Social Media and the use of Social Media (by main stream news organizations, political pundits, and our sitting President), it will remain a platform for sharing information (including the news) for the foreseeable future. Both Facebook and Google have made attempts to tackle fake news. In addition to their own filtering methods, Facebook allows users to flag and report fake news stories. Google has also expanded its fact-check tools to spot and flag fake news.

The reality is, however, that we cannot expect our online platforms to keep up with the deluge of fake media. Media literacy is a necessary skill for our students to learn in order for them to wade through the glut of information available to them online. However, a recent study from Stanford found that most students cannot tell real news from fake.

There is an exercise that I like to do with my students. We talk about the realities of fake news, perhaps ask them to share stories that they thought were real, but later learned were fake. I share with them resources for spotting fake news:

How_to_Spot_Fake_News

Next, I ask them to create a Fake News Story for me. Something that they are likely to see online via Facebook. For this exercise, students often create the obvious: “You Won’t Believe what the Democrats did this Time!” or “Donald Trump is Getting Impeached!” examples. These stories are the most obvious to spot.

The best exercise, however, comes when I ask them to team up and we make a game out of each. Each team presents five news stories. Three of those news articles are fake, two are real. If they are able to “trick” the opposing teams, they receive 1 point for each news article they fool the opposition into believing. They receive 1 point for each article they correctly identify as fake. Students then work really hard to “trick” their classmates – they play off of one another’s known biases, create convincing “news networks,” and spell check like no one’s business! They learn the ins-and-outs of posting and sharing news, viral marketing, and deceptive practices. This makes them better discerners of published media and more able-minded digital citizens.

Advertisements

iPad Keynote Speaker – Greg Kulowiec

Day two of the iPad Summit starts with a Keynote talk by Greg Kulowiec (@gregkulowiec), entitled Plato, Paper & iPads… As someone who has read Plato in the original Greek, I’m curious where he’s going here. I have known Greg for years and seen him present some amazing workshops and talks, so I am excited to see him present.

Greg tells us that this morning, he is going to tell us his story. Greg started teaching in 2005 at Plymouth South High School. When he started, he was wholly on the analogue side and not interested in implementing technology. One day while talking to a peer about a problem he was having, she suggested he check out some “web 2.0 tools.” He didnt’ even know what “web 2.0” was so he went home and googled it. That was his introduction to integrating technology.

Interactive whiteboard, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Interactive whiteboard, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

With smartboards, the technology is still teacher directed. Greg tells us that he got a group of old computers at one point where students could access a Wiki and send emails. He had zero compass and zero path. Many of us have been in the spot where we are using technology because the technology is available. We don’t know why we’re doing it. It doesn’t help students at all.

In Plato’s Allegory of the Cave, prisoners see only shadows and believe it is reality. Finally, a prisoner breaks free, sees the fire, and sees the objects creating fire. His reality is shattered. So, as a teacher, where are we in the story? What is the world? Greg argues that if we don’t have a direction or a purpose, then we are living in shadows. We need to shift our focus to the meaning behind our purpose. What skills do we want our students to have? What do we want them to be able to do? So now that he is more meaningful in integration, he begins to use the tool that will work for his objectives, not just to use the technology. Students begin to make real world connections, interaction with the world, creation of ideas, connection to experts, collaboration, etc. The emphasis is completely different. He then asks us to share our stories; when did our perspective on using technology shift?

Greg then tells us about his experience with iPads. When they integrated the iPad into his classroom, he was back in the cave. He starts using the iPad because… it’s there. He starts focusing on apps, not on what you want students to do! If you want a great list, check out EdTechTeacher’s Tech Tools by subject and skill. The first iPads were very limited, you couldn’t even collaborate because Google Drive didn’t even exist! So initially, everything was focused on “the apps.” You got articles like, “Top 10 apps for History teachers!” We’re back in the cave, isolated.

Greg tells us that with the iPad 2, he realized that the iPad could let him be more creative. It was able to let him create content using the video camera, iMovie, and then publish it to the web! However, you’re still in

danger of the tool driving the creation. Greg highlights that language is important in this process. If you tell your students “Today we’re doing Keynotes!” or “Today we’re doing iMovies!” Be conscious of your language so that you do not get locked into the tool. We need to make a conscious decision about how we are using tools, including analogue. We need to look at all of the tools we use around us, including notebooks and paper, to look at our tasks and objectives. Sometimes, paper is more effective than digital tools. Sketchnoting has taken off as a means to capture information. So we should rethink what role an iPad should play in the classroom. Perhaps most of it should take place off line in a notebook. However, the iPad will allow you to create and share in a way that paper will not.

Greg shares with us his experiences with vinyl. He was a DJ, so feeling and manipulating records gave him a unique connection with the music that doesn’t happen with an iPod or an iPhone. So think about this, are we losing anything when we go digital? Greg next shares the ideal iPad Backpack, Blending Digital & Analog. You can use your iPad to organize digital content, use a paper notebook to capture ideas and sketch notes (even taking pics and dropping them into Google Drive or Evernote), and even a dry erase board with markers. Keep your classroom hybrid. Merge online and offline work. Find tools that are flexible and thoughtful, not using tools to drive your work. He demonstrates this with some sticky notes. He asked several participants to write ideas on a sticky note. He then collected them, used the Post-it App to collect them, shared the post it board, and opened it in Explain Everything!

What an energizing way to start the day!

Web Tools for Ninjas

On my second day at Miami Device, I’m thrilled to attend the session “Web Tools for Ninjas.” I’ve been following Tech Ninja Todd (Todd Nesloney) for years, so I’m feeling a bit like a fangirl! This presentation focuses on tools featured on their website: The 3 Tech Ninjas. Todd’s big suggestion is to focus on 1 or 2 tools, otherwise you get overwhelmed.

The first tool he highlights is Vocaroo. This is a tool that lets you record voice and then share via email, embed, QR code, etc. Todd’s school likes to use this for students who require audio tests. This is a free tool. My friend Moss Pike at Harvard Westlake uses this tool for students to submit audio recordings of language assessments.

Screen Shot 2014-11-07 at 9.49.40 AMAnother great tool they are highlighting SafeShare. Safeshare allows you to take a YouTube video and it filters out the video ads that can be a distraction to students before or after a video is shown in class.

A tool I’m excited to use is Canva. Canva lets you produce some amazing designs (documents, letters, flyers, presentations, etc). They make you look like a high end designer! Shhh… don’t tell my boss, I want them to think I’m a Ninja! I’m especially excited that you can use Canva to build a high quality infographic! I love those and want to use them more in my classroom. As its cloud based, you don’t lose content.

Animoto is a web-based video building and editing tool. It produces beautiful videos. If you are a teacher and register with your school email, then animoto is entirely free! This is unlimited videos and links. Keep in mind that students cannot get a free account.

Poll Everywhere is one of my favorite tools. In fact, during my presentation I’ll be using it.

Screen Shot 2014-11-07 at 10.01.38 AMWe are flying through the tools! The next one they highlight is WordSift. Wordsift takes text, highlights the type of words used and highlights them in teresting ways, such as world clouds. I put in the I have a dream speech, and have this cool word map! If you click on it, then you can trace the origin of various words.

Remind is another popular tool. You can use it to text students and teachers reminders. By creating different groups, you can send out texts to appropriate groups, e.g. parents, particular class period, faculty, department, etc. This way, you don’t have to share your personal phone number. Additionally, no one can respond to the text, which is also handy. You’re getting the information out there. It’s very easy. Also, remind curates all of your content, you cannot delete it. This helps to protect you. No one can claim that you sent something that you did not. You can also pre-schedule messages! This is a great reminder for events, tests, etc.

Skype in the Classroom is an education side to Skype. They provide content and tools just for educators. You don’t have to worry about “random people.” Todd describes it as a Craig’s List for Skype People! Skype in the Classroom is free for schools and ad free. The nice thing about interacting with other educators is they understand that sometimes they are tech issues, sometimes kids are Lord of the Flies… we all know what each other’s concerns are!

Classroom Champions is a way for top performing Olympic and Paralympic athletes connect to schools and build effective, mentoring programs for character building programs. During Olympic Years, it’s al athletes participating in that year’s athletes. In the Spring, you apply to be a Classroom Champions Teacher, this means an athlete is assigned to your classroom. In the Spring, an athlete is assigned to compete for your athlete to visit your school.

Kahoot! is a popular tool at my school. It turns “Exit Tickets” into a game. Students rack up points and  have a fun review session.

Blogging is important for students. As an avid blogger, I can attest to its utility. However, many schools are hesitant about blogging. Kidblog is a great way to give young students autonomy over their own writing within a safe environment. Teachers have control and their security is protected. However, students get to play with the visual elements and content. Other tools for blogging are Blogger (a Google Project) and WordPress. Keep in mind that blogging can be a security concern for many people, so be sure to investigate the tools that you are going to use.

If you’re a tech administrator, check out Ninite! It creates an install bott for updating content on your machines. This is great for allowing you to update and/or install content

Cloud storage is very important. I use about a dozen services. The tool CloudMagic allows you to search all of your cloud platforms to find content and files! This is pretty cool.

Drawastickman.com is a fun site that allows students to draw a story as you progress. It’s very cool.

Incredibox allows you to create your own music! While it’s cool, it can be a bit annoying… Beware! You can put different figures together to build a song and visualize it at the same time.

Project Explorer is a non-profit organization that provides virtual fieldtrips. They have recently updated it to include lesson plans. They have some great projects! They’re short, quick, and to the point. Check out what they have going on:

Sydney Harbour Bridge from ProjectExplorer.org in Australia from ProjectExplorer.org on Vimeo.

Google Art Project is another way to take students on amazing digital field trips.

DIY is a site where students share their process of learning something new through other kids. Students teach one another how they’re learning to shoot a bow and arrow or rebuild a motor.

If you want to learn more about these tools and from your peers, check out the podcast Edu All-Stars. Check out their interview with Secretary of State, Arne Duncan:

I have only captured a few of the tools they highlighted. Check out these tools and more on their website The 3 Tech Ninjas.

Yale’s Digital Commons

Check out Yale’s Digital Commons which allows you to search several libraries, museums, and galleries for digital content accessible from anywhere! Again, this is a free resource.