Tag Archives: Ed Tech

ISTE Guide for Beginners!

It’s ISTE season yet again! Shortly, thousands of people will descend on the city of San Antonio to talk about education and technology. There will be old timers (“I remember when ISTE was…”), vendors (have you seen how Sprocket intends to innovate education), and newbies. If this is your first ISTE, no doubt you are excited. However, it can also be a bit intimidating. If you’re not ready for it, it can eat you alive! Here are some of my tips for surviving as an ISTE newbie:

Get on Twitter

There will be two prominent hashtags on Twitter: #iste (for conference attendees) and #notatiste (for those that didn’t make it). Both will feature amazing content and ideas. Be sure to check in on Twitter a few times a day. Better yet, share your own reflections and experiences of the conference!

Set 2 or 3 Goals

It’s easy to go overboard at ISTE. However, there are so many sessions, playgrounds, posters, happy-hours, etc, that it can become information overload. Instead, in advance, set 2 or 3 goals that you want to accomplish. Are you rolling out a new digital storytelling program? Does your maker-space need a makeover? Perhaps you want to update your digital citizenship program. Whatever your projects, there will be multiple sessions, speakers, and vendors geared towards your objectives. Focus on those!

Watch the Screens

The lines for keynotes can get overwhelming and your favorite ignite! session might conflict with another activity. There are always screens everywhere around ISTE. If you don’t mind not being in the same room, hang out in a lounge and watch the presentation on the big screen tv.

Network

Being on Twitter will really help you here. Meet people, go to happy hours, or just randomly introduce yourself. You will meet many like-minded educators in this world. Say hello, hand out and collect business cards, and follow one another on Twitter. Speaking of Twitter, don’t hesitate to reach out to your favorite super stars if you run into them. I once got quite star-truck over running into Vicki Davis a couple of years ago. Now she follows me on Twitter and has even invited me on a podcast!

Wear Comfortable Shoes

If you listen to nothing else that I say, listen to this: wear comfortable shoes. You will walk… a lot. ISTE is a very large convention and there are events all around the area. You need comfortable walking shoes. I once made the mistake of wearing heels when I was presenting. Never again. Comfortable shoes will be your friend.

So if you’re at ISTE, pop over and say hello if you see me! I’d love to hear what you’re working on. Have a great trip and see you soon!

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The Jobs of Today May not Exist Tomorrow – How do we Prepare Students?

Not long ago, I wrote a blog post entitled: Lifelong Learning is an Essential Skill, not a Buzzword. The more I read about future-readiness, 21st century skills, job market reports, and advances in technology (especially AI), the more I understand this to be true. Recently, PEW Research published a report on the Future of Jobs & Job Training.

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Courtesy of Gerd Leonhardhttps://www.flickr.com/photos/gleonhard/18732734804

This report reaffirmed the fact that in the near future, millions of jobs will be lost to automation and AI that can do these tasks not only just as well, but often better than their human counterparts. These are not just rudimentary, repeatable tasks, but sophisticated, white-collar jobs that have generally been considered “safe” from automation: dermatologists, journalists, claims adjusters, financial reporters, and more. With the rise of automated driving, millions of workers who rely on driving as their means of employment are looking at becoming obsolete (long-haul truck drivers, taxi drivers, delivery wo/men, and more).

Pushing aside the very real, and daunting, questions of what this means for our job market and even Capitalism, for educators and parents this means: how do we prepare students for the stark realities of an ever shifting job market? While new technologies may be depleting jobs, knowing how to leverage them will become an even more essential skill in the future.

“The education system will need to adapt to prepare individuals for the changing labor market. At the same time, recent IT advances offer new and potentially more widely accessible ways to access education.”

Looking at how and when people learn job skills and other training will also need to be examined. Will a traditional high school, college, and beyond model remain the default given the rapidly changing employment models?

“A central question about the future, then, is whether formal and informal learning structures will evolve to meet the changing needs of people who wish to fulfill the workplace expectations of the future.”

PEW delves deeply into this topic, asking experts about their vision of the future and determined 5 Major Themes:

Five major themes about the future of jobs training in the tech age

Considering the uncertainty of the future, what we do know is that we must prepare young people to be flexible and agile learners, critical thinkers, entrepreneurs and innovators, and to know that they must develop a passion and drive for lifelong learning.

While the article is long, I strongly encourage my readers to check out PEW’s publication and put together your own thoughts.

Growing Number of Poor Americans are Phone Only Internet Users – What does that Mean for Education?

PEW Research recently published a study that showed a growing number of lower-income Americans access the internet solely through a smartphone. As many as 1 in 5 American children live at or below the poverty level and roughly half of all children qualify for free/reduced lunch, meaning that they live just above that poverty threshold (about $41K/year

for a family of four). If this trend continues, we should assume that a large portion of our nation’s children will have limited access to broadband and computers and will use a smart device for their internet access. What are the implications for education as teachers and schools move to more digital practices in their institutions?

Limited access to the internet or other resources is what we often call the “Digital Divide;” it often impacts students who are low-income, especially those in rural areas. There is no quick fix to addressing accessibility and broadband internet access is becoming less of a luxury and more of a necessity. What can educators do on an individual level to support students who are on the other side of the digital divide?

While on an individual level, teachers can be aware that many students in their classrooms do not have access to high speed internet or computers at home. They can also promote device agnostic tools (tools like G-Suite for Education can be installed on any device with near full-capability). Another potential option is that they can allow students to use class time and school resources to work on robust, digital assignments. However, teachers often feel powerless to help students when the problems facing students in the digital divide are so complex and need to be resolved at a macro-level.

There are a few attempts to address the digital divide. The e-rate program, which help to subsidize high speed internet in both urban and rural areas, has had a dramatic impact on bringing broad-band access to low-income as well as rural areas. However, even with this subsidy, students often have limited access at home. As the internet has become the primary repository of learning and knowledge, how can we ensure that all of our children have access?

Stay on Top of your News with Feedly

I read a lot of news, blogs, and magazines… a lot. People often ask me: “how did you find this?” or “how do you stay on top of it all?” Well, I cheat. Well, it’s not really cheating. I use an RSS reader. My favorite is feedly. Feedly helps me to organize all of my news feeds by category; for me, those categories include: Hard News (NYTimes, Washington Post, etc), Lite News (think HuffPo), Education, Technology, Social Studies, etc. I don’t need to hunt around the newspapers for relevant content. Rather, they show right up in my feed.

feedly

Courtesy of blog.feedly.com

Feedly has some great free features, namely up to 100 feeds, easy organization into three (3) categories, and mobile & desktop access. You can also share stories directly from the preview pane via Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and email. However, it also has some pretty powerful “pro” and “team” features. For a small fee you have unlimited feeds, unlimited categories, clip from Feedly directly into notebooks like Evernote or OneNote, annotation and highlighting, sharing to WordPress (great for bloggers), and an overall faster interface.

If, like me, you’re an avid reader and need some help staying on top of it all, check out Feedly!

Inspiring & Supporting Innovation at Independent Schools at this year’s ATLIS

 

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Courtesy of Pixabay

“Innovation” — there’s a reason it’s a provocative and powerful topic in the landscape of education. Public, Charter, and Independent Schools are all feeling the pressure from disruptive innovation as well as turning to innovative practices to solve curricular, financial, and recruitment woes. The reality is, we are living in an ever-shifting landscape. Traditional routes of career readiness are no longer reliable, previously “safe” jobs (think accountants, lawyers, and doctors) are now seeing job security fade away, and “traditional” schooling is coming under more scrutiny. The cost of university education is having many individuals rethink the options of pursuing higher education given the relatively flat career landscape facing them on graduation. As such, schools are now looking at innovative practice to help them solve these problems – how can they prepare their students for the jobs of the future (especially if we don’t know what those jobs are)? As a Technology Leader, I am often a part of conversations about innovation. This is not to say that innovation is all about technology, but radical innovation often encompasses employing new technologies. Innovation is challenging… it’s hard. Why? Because it necessitates culture shift and “organizational culture eats strategy for breakfast, lunch, and dinner” — Peter Drucker.

Facing the challenges of innovation in my career and public life, I am especially excited about attending this year’s ATLIS conference in Los Angeles, California (April 24-26) as its theme is “Magic Magic Happen” and its focus is on innovation. I know that I will be inspired by the keynote speeches of Jaime Casap (Educational Evangelist) and Tim Fish (Chief Innovation Office of NAIS); both of them have worked with Independent Schools, helping them to innovate their curriculum and institutions. Looking at the posted schedule, I’m excited to learn more about innovative curriculum enhancements such as incorporating coding into the whole curriculum, implementing gamification, and creating new educational spaces, such as maker spaces in the library. Even better than learning about these initiatives, I’m especially excited to learn how to support them at my institution through transformative professional development and creating & fostering a culture of change.

This year’s ATLIS conference is the most exciting yet. If you are exploring innovative curriculum and technologies in your school, this is the year to attend! You can still register on the ATLIS website.

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Google’s Team Drives are a Great Tool for Project Based Learning

A few months ago, Google began testing a new feature in its Enterprise suite – Team Drives.

 

Google Team Drives are shared spaces where teams can easily store, search, and access their files anywhere, from any device. Unlike files in My Drive, files in Team Drive belong to the team instead of an individual. Even if members leave, the files stay exactly where they are so your team can continue to share information and get work done.

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Courtesy of G-Suite Learning Center

If you are incorporating more project based learning into your classroom, Team Drives are a great way for students to collaborate and share, especially on robust projects. In addition to creating content, they can use it to store materials, bibliographies, media, and more. Additionally, as everyone in the group “owns” the product, you don’t run into a problem when one of them tries to submit content via Google Classroom.

To learn more about Team Drives in G-Suite, click here. If you do not yet see it as an option for your G-Suite account, contact your administrator.

A Great Interactive, Presentation Tool

Let’s be honest, there are a million ways out there to make a presentation and just as many tools designed to help you do just that. Recently, I was introduced to a new tool for creating beautiful, interactive presentations and infographics that actually impressed me: Visme. Visme allows you to create a variety of presentation media: traditional slide-decks, auto-flowing slide decks with embedded content, interactive infographics, design and product features, and more. Here’s a great introduction to Visme:

If you’re a teacher, Visme is a great way to create flipped content, empower students to create robust and beautiful presentations, or otherwise create material to distribute to others. In Visme’s Learning Center, you can easily learn about new features, access tips and tricks, and be inspired by what others have done.