Tag Archives: EdTech

ISTE Guide for Beginners!

It’s ISTE season yet again! Shortly, thousands of people will descend on the city of San Antonio to talk about education and technology. There will be old timers (“I remember when ISTE was…”), vendors (have you seen how Sprocket intends to innovate education), and newbies. If this is your first ISTE, no doubt you are excited. However, it can also be a bit intimidating. If you’re not ready for it, it can eat you alive! Here are some of my tips for surviving as an ISTE newbie:

Get on Twitter

There will be two prominent hashtags on Twitter: #iste (for conference attendees) and #notatiste (for those that didn’t make it). Both will feature amazing content and ideas. Be sure to check in on Twitter a few times a day. Better yet, share your own reflections and experiences of the conference!

Set 2 or 3 Goals

It’s easy to go overboard at ISTE. However, there are so many sessions, playgrounds, posters, happy-hours, etc, that it can become information overload. Instead, in advance, set 2 or 3 goals that you want to accomplish. Are you rolling out a new digital storytelling program? Does your maker-space need a makeover? Perhaps you want to update your digital citizenship program. Whatever your projects, there will be multiple sessions, speakers, and vendors geared towards your objectives. Focus on those!

Watch the Screens

The lines for keynotes can get overwhelming and your favorite ignite! session might conflict with another activity. There are always screens everywhere around ISTE. If you don’t mind not being in the same room, hang out in a lounge and watch the presentation on the big screen tv.

Network

Being on Twitter will really help you here. Meet people, go to happy hours, or just randomly introduce yourself. You will meet many like-minded educators in this world. Say hello, hand out and collect business cards, and follow one another on Twitter. Speaking of Twitter, don’t hesitate to reach out to your favorite super stars if you run into them. I once got quite star-truck over running into Vicki Davis a couple of years ago. Now she follows me on Twitter and has even invited me on a podcast!

Wear Comfortable Shoes

If you listen to nothing else that I say, listen to this: wear comfortable shoes. You will walk… a lot. ISTE is a very large convention and there are events all around the area. You need comfortable walking shoes. I once made the mistake of wearing heels when I was presenting. Never again. Comfortable shoes will be your friend.

So if you’re at ISTE, pop over and say hello if you see me! I’d love to hear what you’re working on. Have a great trip and see you soon!

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The Jobs of Today May not Exist Tomorrow – How do we Prepare Students?

Not long ago, I wrote a blog post entitled: Lifelong Learning is an Essential Skill, not a Buzzword. The more I read about future-readiness, 21st century skills, job market reports, and advances in technology (especially AI), the more I understand this to be true. Recently, PEW Research published a report on the Future of Jobs & Job Training.

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Courtesy of Gerd Leonhardhttps://www.flickr.com/photos/gleonhard/18732734804

This report reaffirmed the fact that in the near future, millions of jobs will be lost to automation and AI that can do these tasks not only just as well, but often better than their human counterparts. These are not just rudimentary, repeatable tasks, but sophisticated, white-collar jobs that have generally been considered “safe” from automation: dermatologists, journalists, claims adjusters, financial reporters, and more. With the rise of automated driving, millions of workers who rely on driving as their means of employment are looking at becoming obsolete (long-haul truck drivers, taxi drivers, delivery wo/men, and more).

Pushing aside the very real, and daunting, questions of what this means for our job market and even Capitalism, for educators and parents this means: how do we prepare students for the stark realities of an ever shifting job market? While new technologies may be depleting jobs, knowing how to leverage them will become an even more essential skill in the future.

“The education system will need to adapt to prepare individuals for the changing labor market. At the same time, recent IT advances offer new and potentially more widely accessible ways to access education.”

Looking at how and when people learn job skills and other training will also need to be examined. Will a traditional high school, college, and beyond model remain the default given the rapidly changing employment models?

“A central question about the future, then, is whether formal and informal learning structures will evolve to meet the changing needs of people who wish to fulfill the workplace expectations of the future.”

PEW delves deeply into this topic, asking experts about their vision of the future and determined 5 Major Themes:

Five major themes about the future of jobs training in the tech age

Considering the uncertainty of the future, what we do know is that we must prepare young people to be flexible and agile learners, critical thinkers, entrepreneurs and innovators, and to know that they must develop a passion and drive for lifelong learning.

While the article is long, I strongly encourage my readers to check out PEW’s publication and put together your own thoughts.

How & Why Educators Should Use Revision History in Google Docs

Revision History

One of my favorite features in G-Suite tools is “Revision History.” This features allows you to see what changes were made, when, and by whom. It’s a powerful tool, especially in education. If you have never accessed the revision history, you can do so (so long as you have “editing” rights on a document) by going to File –> See Revision History.

This brings up a pane on the right hand side that allows you to see what contributors edited the document and when. If you select their names, it will highlight their changes in the marked color. It’s a pretty cool feature! There are numerous reasons why and educator would want to use Revision History in the classroom.

Ensure that Collaborative Projects are Collaborative

Group assignments are common in the classroom. However, it’s not uncommon for a group assignment to be monopolized by one or two students (either out of necessity or willfulness). By using revision history, you can ensure that group members are all participating in an assignment.

Restore a Previous Version

A student may inadvertently delete a section of an assignment or a contribution. One of my favorite features of revision history is that you can restore a previous version. Just find the draft that you want and click “restore this version.”

Ensure that Daily Assignments are Completed… Daily

A lot of teachers assign work that is due daily but checked sporadically. For example, English teachers often require that students keep a daily or weekly diary, social studies teachers ask for students to reflect on assignments, or science teachers require daily recordings of experiment results. The revision history can tell you when something was added to a Google Doc.

Watch the Evolution of a Student’s Writing

When I assign a writing assignment, there are several iterations and revisions. By using the revision history, I don’t need to worry that a hard rough draft is lost or damaged in a student’s backpack or locker. Instead, I can watch the evolution of a student’s writing over several days, weeks, or months. This a powerful tool when teaching writing.

Facilitate Peer Review

If you encourage peer review, revision history can help you to see the feedback and suggestions that students make on one another’s work. This way, you can ensure that they are reading and meaningfully providing feedback.

There are many other ways to apply revision history, but these 5 are a great way to get started with the feature in your classroom.

 

3 Ways to Use Google Classroom Outside of the Classroom!

Google Classroom is finally available – outside of the classroom! Previously, you could only use Google Classroom if you were a G-Suite for Education user and within your own domain. This new flexibility provides some great opportunities for use outside of your own classroom. Here are NUMBER ideas of how you can use Google Classroom, outside of the classroom.

Disseminating & Collecting Data from Organizations you Lead

Google Classroom

Courtesy of Google Blog

Whether you’re an educational technology specialist, a topic specialist, or head up a cos-play group, Google Classroom can be a great way to organize and collect information. For example, if you head up the Parents Organization of your children’s school, you can use Google Classroom to disseminate the updated bylaws for review, comment, and/or edit. If you are leading a professional development workshop on AP Spanish, you can collect videos or written documents using Google Classroom’s “assignments” feature.

Organizing Groups & Consortia

If you lead an educational consortium (e.g. AP Chinese Teachers or Educational Technology), Google Classroom is a great and easy way to create a closed system for discussion and collaboration. This is a great way to collaborate with professionals at other institutions or organizations.

Organizing & Collaborating on Projects with Disparate Contributors

You don’t have to be a teacher to appreciate the power of collaboration. If you are working on a project that requires you to engage users throughout the community, then Google Classroom is a great way to bring it all together. For example, if you are organizing a charity walk, you can use Google Classroom to seek feedback on your marketing (sharing posters and flyers for review, edit, and/or comment), collect multi-media resources that you have delegated to other volunteers, and engage in asynchronous discussions in a walled group.

There are numerous ways to use Google Classroom outside of the classroom. Anytime that you need to readily organize a community, disseminate or collect media, or create a walled community, it’s a great resource to explore!

Growing Number of Poor Americans are Phone Only Internet Users – What does that Mean for Education?

PEW Research recently published a study that showed a growing number of lower-income Americans access the internet solely through a smartphone. As many as 1 in 5 American children live at or below the poverty level and roughly half of all children qualify for free/reduced lunch, meaning that they live just above that poverty threshold (about $41K/year

for a family of four). If this trend continues, we should assume that a large portion of our nation’s children will have limited access to broadband and computers and will use a smart device for their internet access. What are the implications for education as teachers and schools move to more digital practices in their institutions?

Limited access to the internet or other resources is what we often call the “Digital Divide;” it often impacts students who are low-income, especially those in rural areas. There is no quick fix to addressing accessibility and broadband internet access is becoming less of a luxury and more of a necessity. What can educators do on an individual level to support students who are on the other side of the digital divide?

While on an individual level, teachers can be aware that many students in their classrooms do not have access to high speed internet or computers at home. They can also promote device agnostic tools (tools like G-Suite for Education can be installed on any device with near full-capability). Another potential option is that they can allow students to use class time and school resources to work on robust, digital assignments. However, teachers often feel powerless to help students when the problems facing students in the digital divide are so complex and need to be resolved at a macro-level.

There are a few attempts to address the digital divide. The e-rate program, which help to subsidize high speed internet in both urban and rural areas, has had a dramatic impact on bringing broad-band access to low-income as well as rural areas. However, even with this subsidy, students often have limited access at home. As the internet has become the primary repository of learning and knowledge, how can we ensure that all of our children have access?

Stay on Top of your News with Feedly

I read a lot of news, blogs, and magazines… a lot. People often ask me: “how did you find this?” or “how do you stay on top of it all?” Well, I cheat. Well, it’s not really cheating. I use an RSS reader. My favorite is feedly. Feedly helps me to organize all of my news feeds by category; for me, those categories include: Hard News (NYTimes, Washington Post, etc), Lite News (think HuffPo), Education, Technology, Social Studies, etc. I don’t need to hunt around the newspapers for relevant content. Rather, they show right up in my feed.

feedly

Courtesy of blog.feedly.com

Feedly has some great free features, namely up to 100 feeds, easy organization into three (3) categories, and mobile & desktop access. You can also share stories directly from the preview pane via Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and email. However, it also has some pretty powerful “pro” and “team” features. For a small fee you have unlimited feeds, unlimited categories, clip from Feedly directly into notebooks like Evernote or OneNote, annotation and highlighting, sharing to WordPress (great for bloggers), and an overall faster interface.

If, like me, you’re an avid reader and need some help staying on top of it all, check out Feedly!

The Kids are Alright: The Internet is NOT Destroying a Generation

When I tell people what I do for a living, I get a mix of responses. Some people think that it’s great others share their thoughts or concerns. After all, everyone seems to have an opinion on education: how it runs (or they think it runs) and how they believe it should run. Also, everyone seems to have an opinion on “kids these days.” The opinions on both (education & kids) tend to lean heavily negative… or at least concerned. So much so that my friend Carl Hooker published an article “When did Millennial-Bashing Become a Sport?” Like Carl, as an educator, I find it necessary to defend this generation of young people. The reality is, these kids are alright. While new technologies and connectivity may be changing the way the world engages, it is not destroying this generation.

Kids These Days…

Whenever I hear this phrase come out of someone’s mouth, I have the same reaction that I did when I was 15 and Gen X was the whipping boy du jour. I have to resist the urge to roll my eyes and groan… All generations lament the one that comes next. As an ancient historian by training, I can tell you of the Egyptian Papyri from 1500 BCE that complained that “kids these days” don’t respect their elders or worship the gods. Let’s not forget that Sokrates was condemned and put to death for “corrupting the youth of Athens.” Even the Roman poet Horace wrote:

“Our sires’ age was worse than our grandsires’. We, their sons, are more
worthless than they; so in our turn we shall give the world a progeny yet more
corrupt.” Odes III

There are numerous examples of writers, authors, politicians, and scholars complaining that the youth of the day are self-involved, narcissistic, lazy, and corrupt. When I hear my friends or peers begin a complaint with “kids these days” I want to kindly suggest that they are now officially old and there is nothing left to do but get a rocking chair, sit on their porch, and yell at kids to get off their lawn! Of course, I jest. The reality is that as we age, we become nostalgic of our own youth and critique those coming up. Perhaps a realistic look back on our own follies, challenges, and quirks can give us a boost of humility.

But Technology is Different…

While engaging in one of these conversations, a friend of mine commented “Kids these days… they don’t even watch tv anymore!” I was a little taken aback. After all, we were the generation raised by the “idiot box.” Television was supposed to be dumbing down our generation at an alarming rate. Yet, we still produced functioning adults that today complaint about teenagers. Adults often argue (without any type of evidence other than perceived anecdotal experiences) that teenagers are eschewing social interaction for life behind a screen where they are engaging in harmful and morally defunct activities.

rebel

Rebel Without a Cause, Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

However, new devices are not really any different than technologies of past when it came to fears of corrupting youth. For example, the introduction of “car culture” in the 1950’s and 1960’s spurred fears of juvenile delinquency, extra-marital sex, and other forms of laziness and depravity. In the 19th and early 20th centuries, scientists, politicians, and others were concerned that too much exposure to books might physically harm women and hinder their abilities to be effective wives and mothers. New technologies have often spurred fears of their negative impact on adults and (especially) adolescents.

But Technology is DANGEROUS (especially for girls), due to Predators & Crime!

Picture1As a woman in technology, I hear and see this a lot. Whenever I watch an “educational video” meant to warn students and parents about the dangers of the internet, the victim is often a young girl. Is it a wonder that young women steer away from technology fields in the middle school years? Stranger Danger is a fear often perpetuated when it comes to teens (especially girls) online. However, we live in a time that it has never been safer to be a child… especially in America. The reality is, crime has never been lower. However, our perception of crime has never been higher. Am I saying that children in this country or around the world are never abused? Of course not. Unfortunately, children are still the victims of crime, most often by a relative of a friend. However, our fear of the internet predator is so skewed from reality that it impacts what we think children do, or should do, online. Nothing contradicts this reality more than our relationship with ride sharing services.

Due to tools (remember that idiot box Gen Xers?) such as the 24 hour news cycle, we are inundated with stories of crime. The more horrific and random, the more common it will show up in our news feed. The mundane doesn’t sell ad space.

To-catch-A-Preditor

But the Internet is Different – Teens are Addicted to Social Media!

This is another refrain that I hear from adults. Teenagers are addicted to their devices. Addiction is a loaded term. If you have an addict in your life, then you know the power of this disease. Also, adults commonly put their own relationships and experiences onto
their children. In my experience as an educator, I have found that teenagers often have a healthier relationship with their devices than their parents. Be honest, how many of you have criticized your children/nieces/nephews or other adolescents for behavior you engage in? Do you check your phone at the dinner table or respond to texts while out with friends? What about while driving (which you should never… ever do!)?

teens on screens

Courtesy of at the Speed of Creativity in? 

I would argue that adolescents are not addicted to their devices so much as adolescents are driven to be social! When I was an adolescent, I literally spent hours on the phone… when it was connected to a cord to the wall. I would extend it to the pantry on the other side of the room so that I could close the door and talk in relative privacy. It drove my parents so nuts they got me and my brother our own lines! That led to some robust fights over phone squatters rights… We also spent hours and hours walking around the mall (without adults and well before cell phones) talking to one another or other teens that we met while out. Were we expounding on detente or our latest interpretation of Tolstoy? Perhaps going over our homework? Of course not! We were teenagers. We talked about boys we liked, the latest episode of 90210, or gossiped about other kids in school. That is what adolescents do. This is how adolescents learn valuable social skills that they build on as adults.

What is different in this technological age is that, because of our perceived concept of crime and dangerous for adolescents, they have little to no unstructured and unsupervised social time. One of my favorite books in the last few years has been danah boyd’s It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked TeensIf you have not read danah’s work, you definitely should. She delves into the relationship that teenagers have with their devices and one another, arguing that because we as a society have removed their physical social spaces (when was the last time you saw children biking or playing at the park unsupervised), they have delved into Social Media and technology to extend their social circles and engage with friends in an unstructured way, outside of adult’s prying eyes. In fact, this level of helicopter parenting has led to a movement: free-range parenting. If you read their website, you will find that it advocates what many of us viewed simply as “being a kid.”

But I’ve Seen Stories of Kids Being Hurt or Engaging is Online Bullying!

Of course you have. As I’ve said, while we have made great strides in protecting children in this country and the world as a whole, children still get hurt by adults and by other children. While our conversation on Bullying could likely use a re-examination (check out the book Bully Nation by Susan Evaporter), we certainly do need to help children engage online safely and more effectively. The answer to helping children that are acting out online is not to condemn the tool or ban its access (prohibition never works to begin with), but engage children and adolescents with empathy. Technology is not the cause of adolescent misbehavior, but rather an amplifier. The adolescent that is arranging to meet strangers online for trysts is clearly troubled and in need of adult intervention and help. A student discussing their depression or contemplating self-harm needs medical and social support. In fact, there are numerous examples of peers intervening to help one another when they see something online.

Benefits of Teens Engaging Online

Rather than lamenting the fact that teenagers are being corrupted by devices, I think it’s important to highlight what they can do more effectively because they are engaged. For one, children and adolescents are writing now more than ever. And no, they are not handing in essays in emoji and textese, they know the difference of context. Just as none of us were Shakespeare at 15 (not even Shakespeare), their writing still needs to grow. However, between social media, online forums, and other digital spaces, they write more than the average adolescent of our generation.

They are also creating meaningful connections online. For example, students in a Chinese class can engage another class in China. Learning to text in another language is a great form of cultural immersion as well as a means to grow language skills in context! Students are building (and even selling) apps, creating online YouTube sensations, and are even more up to date on current events than their parents (they’re also less likely to fall for Fake News than their more mature counterparts, aka US).

The reality is, technology and the internet is not ruining this generation. The kids… the kids are alright.