Tag Archives: Educational Resources

The Jobs of Today May not Exist Tomorrow – How do we Prepare Students?

Not long ago, I wrote a blog post entitled: Lifelong Learning is an Essential Skill, not a Buzzword. The more I read about future-readiness, 21st century skills, job market reports, and advances in technology (especially AI), the more I understand this to be true. Recently, PEW Research published a report on the Future of Jobs & Job Training.

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Courtesy of Gerd Leonhardhttps://www.flickr.com/photos/gleonhard/18732734804

This report reaffirmed the fact that in the near future, millions of jobs will be lost to automation and AI that can do these tasks not only just as well, but often better than their human counterparts. These are not just rudimentary, repeatable tasks, but sophisticated, white-collar jobs that have generally been considered “safe” from automation: dermatologists, journalists, claims adjusters, financial reporters, and more. With the rise of automated driving, millions of workers who rely on driving as their means of employment are looking at becoming obsolete (long-haul truck drivers, taxi drivers, delivery wo/men, and more).

Pushing aside the very real, and daunting, questions of what this means for our job market and even Capitalism, for educators and parents this means: how do we prepare students for the stark realities of an ever shifting job market? While new technologies may be depleting jobs, knowing how to leverage them will become an even more essential skill in the future.

“The education system will need to adapt to prepare individuals for the changing labor market. At the same time, recent IT advances offer new and potentially more widely accessible ways to access education.”

Looking at how and when people learn job skills and other training will also need to be examined. Will a traditional high school, college, and beyond model remain the default given the rapidly changing employment models?

“A central question about the future, then, is whether formal and informal learning structures will evolve to meet the changing needs of people who wish to fulfill the workplace expectations of the future.”

PEW delves deeply into this topic, asking experts about their vision of the future and determined 5 Major Themes:

Five major themes about the future of jobs training in the tech age

Considering the uncertainty of the future, what we do know is that we must prepare young people to be flexible and agile learners, critical thinkers, entrepreneurs and innovators, and to know that they must develop a passion and drive for lifelong learning.

While the article is long, I strongly encourage my readers to check out PEW’s publication and put together your own thoughts.

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Teaching the Holocaust – Resources for Education

As a history teacher, I am also struck by both the impact and magnitude of teaching the Holocaust. The Holocaust was neither first, nor sadly the last, targeted genocide in world

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Holocaust Memorial Berlin – Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

history. However, due to the meticulous record keeping of Nazi’s and the fortitude and resilience of the Jewish people, it is a powerful lesson that educators must tackle in their classrooms.

One of the best resources for teaching the Holocaust can be found at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Under the Teacher Resources page, educators can find a myriad of tools to help them cover not only this horrific event in history, but means of applying the lessons of the Holocaust in the modern day. Lesson plans are divided by grade level and subject matter. Teachers can incorporate various activities using multiple modalities to help teach their students about the events leading up to, surrounding, and impacted by the Holocaust. Educators interested in learning more about the Holocaust and impactful teaching strategies should check out the Professional Events and Resources page where they can learn about the annual conference, workshops, and other professional development opportunities.

3 Ways to Use Google Classroom Outside of the Classroom!

Google Classroom is finally available – outside of the classroom! Previously, you could only use Google Classroom if you were a G-Suite for Education user and within your own domain. This new flexibility provides some great opportunities for use outside of your own classroom. Here are NUMBER ideas of how you can use Google Classroom, outside of the classroom.

Disseminating & Collecting Data from Organizations you Lead

Google Classroom

Courtesy of Google Blog

Whether you’re an educational technology specialist, a topic specialist, or head up a cos-play group, Google Classroom can be a great way to organize and collect information. For example, if you head up the Parents Organization of your children’s school, you can use Google Classroom to disseminate the updated bylaws for review, comment, and/or edit. If you are leading a professional development workshop on AP Spanish, you can collect videos or written documents using Google Classroom’s “assignments” feature.

Organizing Groups & Consortia

If you lead an educational consortium (e.g. AP Chinese Teachers or Educational Technology), Google Classroom is a great and easy way to create a closed system for discussion and collaboration. This is a great way to collaborate with professionals at other institutions or organizations.

Organizing & Collaborating on Projects with Disparate Contributors

You don’t have to be a teacher to appreciate the power of collaboration. If you are working on a project that requires you to engage users throughout the community, then Google Classroom is a great way to bring it all together. For example, if you are organizing a charity walk, you can use Google Classroom to seek feedback on your marketing (sharing posters and flyers for review, edit, and/or comment), collect multi-media resources that you have delegated to other volunteers, and engage in asynchronous discussions in a walled group.

There are numerous ways to use Google Classroom outside of the classroom. Anytime that you need to readily organize a community, disseminate or collect media, or create a walled community, it’s a great resource to explore!

Inspiring & Supporting Innovation at Independent Schools at this year’s ATLIS

 

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Courtesy of Pixabay

“Innovation” — there’s a reason it’s a provocative and powerful topic in the landscape of education. Public, Charter, and Independent Schools are all feeling the pressure from disruptive innovation as well as turning to innovative practices to solve curricular, financial, and recruitment woes. The reality is, we are living in an ever-shifting landscape. Traditional routes of career readiness are no longer reliable, previously “safe” jobs (think accountants, lawyers, and doctors) are now seeing job security fade away, and “traditional” schooling is coming under more scrutiny. The cost of university education is having many individuals rethink the options of pursuing higher education given the relatively flat career landscape facing them on graduation. As such, schools are now looking at innovative practice to help them solve these problems – how can they prepare their students for the jobs of the future (especially if we don’t know what those jobs are)? As a Technology Leader, I am often a part of conversations about innovation. This is not to say that innovation is all about technology, but radical innovation often encompasses employing new technologies. Innovation is challenging… it’s hard. Why? Because it necessitates culture shift and “organizational culture eats strategy for breakfast, lunch, and dinner” — Peter Drucker.

Facing the challenges of innovation in my career and public life, I am especially excited about attending this year’s ATLIS conference in Los Angeles, California (April 24-26) as its theme is “Magic Magic Happen” and its focus is on innovation. I know that I will be inspired by the keynote speeches of Jaime Casap (Educational Evangelist) and Tim Fish (Chief Innovation Office of NAIS); both of them have worked with Independent Schools, helping them to innovate their curriculum and institutions. Looking at the posted schedule, I’m excited to learn more about innovative curriculum enhancements such as incorporating coding into the whole curriculum, implementing gamification, and creating new educational spaces, such as maker spaces in the library. Even better than learning about these initiatives, I’m especially excited to learn how to support them at my institution through transformative professional development and creating & fostering a culture of change.

This year’s ATLIS conference is the most exciting yet. If you are exploring innovative curriculum and technologies in your school, this is the year to attend! You can still register on the ATLIS website.

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Free Literary Texts & Resources for Teachers & Students

I recently discovered CommonLit, a free curated repository of fiction and non-fiction works for teachers and students. This is a great resource for educators looking to infuse content into their course work. Educators can browse for content by grade level, grenre, theme, literary device, or standard.

As a history teacher, I especially liked that works included related texts and media. For example, I could access the Articles of Confederation, under paired texts I could then direct students to the Declaration of Independence, the Bill of Rights, and Shay’s rebellion. They also couple it with related Media, such as a Crash Course video.

Teachers can also use CommonLit with their students as a portal to assign readings, assess work, and track progress. It is an all-in-one resource for English, Humanities, and History teachers!

Take an Online Course from Harvard – For Free!

harvard_wreath_logo_1Harvard University is one of the most distinguished names in education. In addition to its brick and mortar classes, they offer a variety of online courses. In fact, a number of their courses are offered for free! If you would like to stoke your passions for Shakespeare, you can take a course on Hamlet. If you are interested in public health, check out the course on the Opioid Epidemic. There are hundreds of courses to choose from. You can browse and search on their website.

Effective Ways for Educators to Use Twitter

I am a big fan of using Twitter to share, collaborate, and learn. This infographic highlights many ways that educators can use Twitter in their practice.

infographic26 Effective Ways to use Twitter for Teachers and Educators Infographic
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