Tag Archives: Educational Technology

Learn to Spot Fake News by Creating It (In a Game)

badnews-tablet-intro.pngFake News, disinformation, and conspiracy theories are not just the subject of political investigations and Sunday night commentaries, but there are a legitimate concern for those who need to teach digital and media literacies. To that end, a developer has created a free online game called Bad News.

According to its creators:

The Bad News Game confers resistance against disinformation by putting players in
the position of the people who create it, and as such gain insight into the various
tactics and methods used by ‘real’ fake news-mongers to spread their message.
This, in turn, builds up resistance.

They have also created an Educator sheet to help teachers and specialist employ the game and teaching digital media literacy skills at their institutions.

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How & Why to Report a Post on Social Media

A few weeks ago, I wrote a response to the political activation of the Parkland students entitled “Don’t Call Them the Selfie Generation!” The March for our Lives movement, along with other topics in the news, have highlighted that Social Media is powerful and impactful in the modern world. It has been especially potent in the hands of young people, as we have seen with the latest political movements surrounding school shootings. JSTOR recently posted an article highlighting “What Parkland Tells us About Teens and Social Media.”

As the story continues, and we are closer to the March 24th March for Our Lives in Washington D.C., I have been following the voices of these students who continue to talk and speak up in spite of some very real consequences like school suspension and targeted harassment from anonymous sources and political pundits. When I speak to my own students about how I can help empower their voices, they tell me: Let US speak; even if you mean well, don’t speak for us. What they want, is their voices heard.

As Twitter (my favorite social media platform) has become the platform of choice for this movement, I have started to take a few minutes every day to report targeted harassment and threats against these teens and others. Twitter has made a concerted effort to stop harassment on their platform. However, the human component is an important element for success. Therefore, as a means to help amplify their voices and support legitimate, challenging conversations on social media, I report bots and harassers. It’s pretty easy to do this. Here is a step by step way to do just that.

When you see a posting that issues threats, uses slurs, encourages self harm, or is part of a systematic threat system, you can report that account and/or that tweet. To do so, Click on the button on the top right of the tweet (it looks like a carrot). 

You will then be given the option to report the tweet.

Twitter allows you to report for a myriad of reasons (spam, harassment, etc).

Twitter allows you to report tweets on behalf of another person (which I have been doing).

 

You can also include example tweets to support the case.

Social Media is not going away any time soon. I encourage you to help make it a true democratizing place by reporting abuse, threats, bots, and spam. Amplify the voices of others by keeping them safe from harassment and threats.

 

Sustainable Innovation in Schools

Innovation…. the cause of and solution to all of our problems, at least it is according to every article, book, or keynote speaker in the last couple of years. It will reinvent education, but only after it destroys the standard schoolhouse. We seem to act as though innovation is a 21st century invention. However, education has long been a realm of

innovation, from one room school houses, to the standardized classroom, to the open classroom; from slate, to paper, to computer; or from abacus, to slide ruler, to calculator. The story of modern innovation could be told in a classroom. Unfortunately, the word “innovation” has been so overused that it risks entering the lexicon of buzzwords. This is a shame because innovation has an important and strategic role in education.

I do not mean to diminish the power of innovation but rather the contrived manner in which it is applied as a panacea to what ails us. Rather than being respectfully regarded as the logical extension of inquiry and exploration, it is often viewed as the result of luck or happenstance; the deus ex machina of our times. In a realm as important and vital as education, this can be problematic or even dangerous thinking. For innovation in education to be truly impactful, it must be sustainable. To be sustainable, it must be devised thoughtfully and applied strategically.

Innovation, at its heart, addresses a need: productivity, efficiency, or opportunity. Innovative practice is one that is methodical and incorporates regular feedback. To determine the heart of our innovative needs and practice, we must employ a discerning eye for what Heidi Hayes Jacobs calls classical vs antiquated educational practices. What is classical is timeless and enduring, what is antiquated worked for a time, but that time has passed. Let us look at the graphing calculator replacing the slide ruler. It allowed students to more readily apply higher order mathematical practice in order to quickly and accurately solve complex equations. However, any good math teacher will tell you that it’s not the calculator alone, but its application and process. The tool evolved to fit the modern needs of the skill set. This is why calculators have endured, while other “innovations” (like the open classroom) have failed. Innovation in schools and classrooms should be meaningful, address contemporary challenges, and enrich the learning environment. Only by doing this will innovation in schools be sustainable and enduring.

The Jobs of Today May Not Exist Tomorrow – How do we Prepare Students?

Not long ago, I wrote a blog post entitled: Lifelong Learning is an Essential Skill, not a Buzzword. The more I read about future-readiness, 21st century skills, job market reports, and advances in technology (especially AI), the more I understand this to be true. Recently, PEW Research published a report on the Future of Jobs & Job Training.

This report reaffirmed the fact that in the near future, millions of jobs will be lost to automation and AI that can do these tasks not only just as well, but often better than their human counterparts. These are not just rudimentary, repeatable tasks, but sophisticated, white-collar jobs that have generally been considered “safe” from automation: dermatologists, journalists, claims adjusters, financial reporters, and more. With the rise of automated driving, millions of workers who rely on driving as their means of employment are looking at becoming obsolete (long-haul truck drivers, taxi drivers, delivery wo/men, and more).

Pushing aside the very real, and daunting, questions of what this means for our job market and even Capitalism, for educators and parents this means: how do we prepare students for the stark realities of an ever shifting job market? While new technologies may be depleting jobs, knowing how to leverage them will become an even more essential skill in the future.

“The education system will need to adapt to prepare individuals for the changing labor market. At the same time, recent IT advances offer new and potentially more widely accessible ways to access education.”

Looking at how and when people learn job skills and other training will also need to be examined. Will a traditional high school, college, and beyond model remain the default given the rapidly changing employment models?

“A central question about the future, then, is whether formal and informal learning structures will evolve to meet the changing needs of people who wish to fulfill the workplace expectations of the future.”

PEW delves deeply into this topic, asking experts about their vision of the future and determined 5 Major Themes:

Five major themes about the future of jobs training in the tech age

Considering the uncertainty of the future, what we do know is that we must prepare young people to be flexible and agile learners, critical thinkers, entrepreneurs and innovators, and to know that they must develop a passion and drive for lifelong learning.

While the article is long, I strongly encourage my readers to check out PEW’s publication and put together your own thoughts.

Show your Typing Merits with TypeDojo

sample-certificateMicro-credentialing has become a new trend in the educational world. It’s a quick and easy way to show off and demonstrate your skills without having to spend more on a new degree. Additionally, it’s a way to show skills that are simply not demonstrable through traditional methods. If you’re looking for a new credentialing service to show off your students’ typing skills (a skillset that is on the decline), then check out TypeDojo.

TypeDojo allows you to show off your typing skills using a variety of tests for both speed and accuracy. You can demonstrate proficiency in a 1 minute, 3 minute, and 5 minute tests as well as demonstrate mastery and words per minute (WPM). Even better, you can target a test’s word strength by grade level (grades 1-8) and then dive more deeply into the skillsets as you progress (e.g. compound words, left hand words, etc). If your students need a refresher (or to learn how to type properly), try out one of their typing games; I especially enjoyed Ninja vs. Zombie during the Halloween season!

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If you’re an educator, pairing the typing games with proficiency testing is a great way to help kids master their keyboarding skills. Check out TypeDojo today!

 

Edutopia’s New Resources on Digital Citizenship

Digital Citizenship is always a hot topic with both educators and their schools. I have long been critical of the “stranger danger” focus of most digital citizenhsip curricula. This focus has over-exaggerated the risks of online predators and misinformed a generation of children and their parents, often with detrimental effects.

I was so happy to see Edutopia’s updated curriculum and guidelines, What Your Students Really Need to Know about Digital Citizenship, crafted by the esteemed educator Vicki Davis. It focuses on students created robust passwords (that they don’t share with others), not posting private information, not sharing without permission, the idea of media ownership, and more.

With this ideas coupled with Common Sense Media’s curriculum or the new one introduced by Google, you will be well prepared to help your students be successful online.

Fake News Lesson Plan Ideas

I recently had the privilege of participating in Vicki Davis’s show, 10 minute teacher. We talked about teaching students new Media Literacy skills in the era of “Fake News.”