Tag Archives: GAFE

How (and why) to add a photo to your Google Account

I work a lot in the Google platform, both within my school as well as my peers at other institutions. It’s a great collaborative platform. I’m always surprised to find that most people don’t have a photo set for their Google Account. There are actually some good reasons to set a photo (even if it’s not *your* photo):

  • It gives your account personality and branding.
  • It allows senders to know they are sharing with the right person.
  • It can help you to keep multiple accounts straight.

screen-shot-2016-09-12-at-1-30-09-pmAdding a photo to your Google Account is easy. Open up one of your Google Apps, like Google Drive. At the top right of the page, you will see either the initial of your first name or a photo (if you or your administrator has previous set one). Click on that circle and then click on the text “change.”

Next, a window will pop up that allows you to upload a photo, access photos from Google Photos or Google+, or to take a photo (if your computer is equipped with a camera). You will then have the option to crop the photo, align, and enter a caption. Then click “set as profile photo” and you are done!

screen-shot-2016-09-12-at-1-34-22-pm

Advertisements

Protect Student Data and Privacy in the Cloud – Come Join the Conversation

Come join the conversation about how we can all work to protect student data and privacy without sacrificing the benefits of learning and working in the cloud.

Source: Protect Student Data and Privacy in the Cloud – Come Join the Conversation

4 Math Add-Ons for Google Docs

This is reblogged from my post on FreeTech4Teachers.

Google Docs is a popular word processing tool. However, many people don’t realize that there are 4 great add-ons for Math that allow teachers and students to harness the power of Google. You can add any of these features to a Google Doc by selecting Add-ons → Get Add-ons.

g(Math)

g(Math) is a popular tool for Math students and teachers. It allows you to create robust expressions and graphs that you can insert directly into your Google Doc. Input expressions using LaTeX, select pre-built formulas which gMath will convert to LaTeX for you, draw your own formula, or even speak to insert math equations (in Chrome Only). Check out the g(Math) guru for extensive tutorials.

Calculator

Sometimes you just need a simple calculator to check your work or perform calculations. Add a calculator to any Google Doc by adding… read the rest of this article at FreeTech4Teachers.

Use Google Scholar to Support Student Research

This is reblogged from my post on FreeTech4Teachers

Use Google Scholar to Support Student Research.

Use Google Scholar to Support Student Research

This is a guest post from Jennifer Carey (@TeacherJenCarey) of EdTechTeacher– an advertiser on this site.If you have asked your students to engage in research, then undoubtedly they have returned with a fresh list of results from a Google search. It can be a challenge in this era of search engine algorithms to teach students to engage with more traditional research methods and tools. Google Scholar is a great way to introduce them to this work while simultaneously working in a mode that is more familiar to them.

Google Scholar Search

Google Scholar is a Google search engine that allows you to look specifically for academic articles… freetech4teachers

Ideas for using Peardeck & Google Drive in Your Classroom

This is reblogged from my post on FreeTech4Teachers

As more schools go 1:1, teachers often feel challenged to make their traditional lessons and activities more interactive. One of my favorite tools is Pear Deck because it allows a teacher to take a PowerPoint, Google Presentation, or PDF and incorporate various student activities to check for understanding and engagement. Pear Deck is free for students and teachers (with a higher end, paid premium model) and it fully integrates with Google Apps for Education.

When you sign in to your Pear Deck account, create a new interactive lesson by selecting “New Deck.” You can then create a slideshow from scratch or import a PowerPoint, Google Presentation, or PDF…

You can the complete article here.

New Google Classroom update: Little things that make it a big deal

This is a great summary of the new features in Google Classroom!

History Tech

The Google folks have been busy – and it seems as if they’ve been listening to teachers. Today, a few handy updates to Google Classroom were announced. If you’re not using Classroom, you really need to take a few minutes, perhaps, to come to your senses. It is a handy time saver and teaching tool that’s free, accessible anywhere, easy to use, and did you know it’s free? The biggest update is the ability to now

View original post 284 more words

How to enhance your lessons with Google Art Project

This is reblogged from my post on Daily Genius.

gap_logo

Google Art Project is one of my favorite tools available online. It is a repository of high resolution images and 3D “museum view” virtual art gallery tours. Since its inception in 2011, Google Art Project has grown from its initial collaboration of 17 international museums to more than 151 and is now available in 18 languages.

This is a great tool for introducing students to Art from around the world. Here are a few ideas for lesson plans that you can use in conjunction with Google Art Project.

CREATE & CURATE A GALLERY

Google Art Project will allow you to create and curate your own gallery. You can have students build a project thematically (styles, emotional experiences, etc), chronologically, culturally, and more. Students select the pieces that they want to add to their gallery, move them around (just as a museum curators places art pieces in an exhibit), and then share them privately or publicly. This could be a great way for a student to showcase their understanding of a particular artist or style as a project for an Art History, History, Social Studies, or Humanities course.

COMPARE WORKS OF ART SIDE BY SIDE

Using the “Compare” model, you can put two works of art side by side and perform an in depth analysis of the works. Here is one of my favorite exercises:

google art project

You will see that I have selected A Sunday on La Grande Jatte by Seurat (Chicago Institute of Art) andBreakfast by Signac (Kröller-Müller Museum); both of these artists were masters of pointillism. I have students examine the pieces in high definition, side-by-side, and explore the different techniques between these two artists.

Students write up their comparative analysis in their Art History notebook and present on the stylistic differences in class. This can also help students understand how styles and techniques evolve over time (Seurat and Signac developed pointillism out of the styles of impressionism). You can assign specific works of art to students (like I do above) or you can have students choose and compare pieces on their own.

This is a great way to teach students to engage the content in depth and perform comparative analysis.

STUDENTS STUDY & “FORGE” THE MASTERS

A common practice in Art courses is to study the work of master artists by reproducing their work. A fun way to do this is to ask students to “create a forgery.”

Students could select an artist and study their life, style, work, and technique; the high definition, zoomable figures on Google Art Project allows them to study numerous works of art that are held in collections around the world. After they have done this, ask them to create a fake!

They can host a gallery opening where visitors compare their reproduction to the original works of the artist.

PARTICIPATE IN AN ART TALK

Google hosts regular Hangouts on Air with prominent curators. They announce the schedule on theirGoogle+ page and post the recordings on theirYouTube page. Students can prepare for the announced topic and submit questions to professionals. It’s a great way to engage students with modern Art curation.

Google has also posted some different lesson ideashere. With more and more expansions to the Google Art Project (the most recent being its Street Art Collection), there will be more opportunities for students to explore the world of Art.

This resource continues to grow and provides students with the ability to explore art in new and interesting ways, outside of a textbook, or more in-depth than they could at a museum.

LEARN MORE ABOUT BRINGING GOOGLE INTO YOUR CLASSROOM!

google art project

  • Google & Web Tools in the Student-Centered Classroom
  • Google & Chromebooks
  • The Chromebook Classroom
  • And More!

View the Full Course Catalog at ettsummer.org