Tag Archives: Gilder Lehrman

A Virtual Tour of Gettysburg

As we prepare for the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address, there is a broad array of information on the topic. If you would like to hear a modern rendition of the speech, listen here.

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History highlights the battle in an interactive tour.

If you would like another interactive resource, check out the Civil War Battlefield App, Gettysburg (free).

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Gettysburg: Insights & Perspectives

Thure de Thulstrup, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Thure de Thulstrup, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

On July 1, 1863, the Battle of Gettysburg began in Pennsylvania. It is one of the most important battles of the American Civil War. The Fall edition of History Now, the quarterly online journal published by the Gilder Lehrman Institute, highlights and explores and the battle from leadership, urban impact, and the pivotal speech by President Abraham Lincoln.

The publication is free to students and teachers. In addition to scholarly articles, it provides numerous educational resources. If you are interested in American History, it’s a great publication.

Gilder Lehrman’s First Ladies Series, Lesson Plans & Interactive Map

Eleanor_Roosevelt_portrait_1933This quarter’s Gilder Lehrman’s “History Now” series features the historical role of first ladies in American politics. The issue, “First Ladies’ Contributions to Political Issues and the National Welfare” highlights the roles of the President’s spouse from Martha Washington all the way to Betty Ford. It explores their personalities, political temperament, social role, and even controversial status.

In addition to these fascinating articles, they include two lesson plans that help educators present the material in alliance with the common core as well as an interactive map of their birth places. Gilder Lehrman provides a plethora of resources for teachers of American History.

Gilder Lehrman/NEH Institute: The Empire City (Day 2)

So, at the end of a rather full Day 2, I have to admit that I’m a bit on “information overload,” so I’m a little… frazzled. As such, don’t be surprised to see some revisions on this over the next couple of days. It’s been a while since the sheer volume of information has left me felt… exhausted, yet it happened today (and I’m only in Day 1)!

This Seminar Focuses on the Empire City: New York City 1877-2001. It is hosted by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and cosponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities. There is no way that I can summarize the entirety of the day, I will just try to relate on some of the experiences that I had.

The first session focused on the resources available via the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. They house thousands of primary source documents related to American History and readily make these resources available to the public. If you have not done so, check out their Affiliate School Program (entirely free), their digital collection, and resources for educators. Their focus is on the importance and practical application of primary sources – they provide documents, resources, and lesson plans for educators (incorporated into common core standards).

The morning, we focused on “The RIse of New York to National Dominance,” in which Professor Kenneth Jackson brought forth the question (and possible answers to) “Why New York? Why did New York become the most prominent and important city in the United States over others like Philadelphia, Chicago, Los Angeles, etc.” New York City has a unique history that has led to its (seemingly permanent) position as the economic and cultural capital of the United States. We discussed issues such as geography, economy, culture, and even ‘pure damn luck.’

The next hour we discussed the “Changing Role of Women in Post-Civil War America,” hostd by Professor Karen Markoe. She was quick to point out that investigating the role and position of 50% of the population in a century and a half period is an impossible task – yet feminist scholars always like to pigeon hole the role of women. She highlighted some common and well-recognized names: Margaret Sanger and Hetty Green (the Witch of Wall Street), but was quick to point out that we had only scratched the surface of prominent New York women.

The afternoon, we began to investigate the experience of literature in Gotham, specifically the work of Edith Wharton and her work The Age of Innocence as highlgihted by Professor John Rocco. We discussed the changing atmosphere of New York’s elite from the late 19th century through the “Jazz Age” (as higlighted by Hemmingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald) – by the way, if you have not seen the preview of the new 2012 film “The Great Gatsby” it is a highly recommend! Even if the film is terrible, the preview is amazing!

The rest of the afternoon we spent at the New York Historical Society, examining primary source documents and learning about the many, many resources available at Giler Lehrman. It was a vastly stimulating and thoroughly exhausting day… and I’m only 20% through the experience!

Press Release: NEH Gilder Lehrman Seminar – Empire City: New York from 1877-2001

CONTACT:                                                                             FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Chelsea Van der Gaag

vandergaag@gilderlehrman.org

Tel.: (646) 366-9666 x11

Fax: (646) 366-9669

 

Fort Worth teacher to Attend NEH Landmarks Workshop on New York and American Urban History at Columbia University 

Fort Worth, TX June 7, 2012 This summer, Trinity Valley School Teacher Jennifer Carey will travel to Columbia University in New York, NY, to attend a weeklong NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshop presented by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History entitled “Empire City: New York from 1877 to 2001.”

Led by renowned scholars Kenneth T. Jackson of Columbia University and Karen Markoe of SUNY Maritime College, seminar participants will include K–12 teachers who were selected by the Gilder Lehrman Institute in a competitive process.

Headed by historians Jackson and Markoe, and presented by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and the National Endowment for the Humanities, this workshop will explore key moments in the history of the United States. Using New York as a lens, the seminar will focus on the intersection of history and place in one tiny spot on the map with a major role in the history of our nation. In 1624, the Dutch West India Company set up a small trading post in a huge, sheltered harbor where three rivers met and several islands offered protection against potential enemies. Four hundred years later, this small settlement at the southern tip of the island of Manhattan has grown into the center of capitalism and the largest metropolis on earth. Including lectures, discussions, and field trips, the seminar will provide teaching strategies for attendees to bring back to their own classrooms.

In 2012, the Gilder Lehrman Institute will offer more than 1,000 educators the chance to study American history with leading historians at top institutions throughout the United States and United Kingdom. Each participant will work with primary source documents provided by professors and the Gilder Lehrman Collection, and in addition will receive reading materials, room and board, transportation for tours, and a travel stipend. Since the program’s inception, more than 7,000 educators have participated in Gilder Lehrman Teacher Seminars, and most attendees rate the program as their best professional development experience.

More information about this seminar and the complete list of 2012 Gilder Lehrman Teacher Seminars is available at www.gilderlehrman.org/teacherseminars.

About the Seminar Directors

Kenneth T. Jackson is the Jacques Barzun Professor in History and the Social Sciences at Columbia University.

http://history.columbia.edu/faculty/Jackson.html

Karen Markoe is Distinguished Professor of History and Chair of the Humanities Department at Maritime College, State University of New York.

http://www.sunymaritime.edu/facultystaff.aspx?id=44

About NEH Landmarks of American History: Workshops for School Teachers

The National Endowment for the Humanities is an independent grant-making agency of the federal government. NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops provide the opportunity for K–12 educators to engage in intensive study and discussion of important topics in American history and culture. These one-week programs give participants direct experiences in the interpretation of significant historical and cultural sites and the use of archival and other primary evidence. Landmarks Workshops present the best scholarship on a specific landmark or related cluster of landmarks, enabling participants to gain a sense of the importance of historical places, to make connections between what they learn in the Workshop and what they teach, and to develop enhanced teaching or research materials.

http://www.neh.gov/divisions/education/other-opportunities/empire-city-new-york-1877%E2%80%932001

About the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

Founded in 1994 by Richard Gilder and Lewis E. Lehrman, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History is a nonprofit organization devoted to the improvement of history education. The Institute has developed an array of programs for schools, teachers, and students that now operate in all fifty states, including a website that features the more than 60,000 unique historical documents in the Gilder Lehrman Collection, www.gilderlehrman.org. Each year the Institute offers support and resources to tens of thousands of teachers, and through them enhances the education of more than a million students. The Institute’s programs have been recognized by awards from the White House, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Organization of American Historians.

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The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History

19 West 44th Street, Suite 500

New York, NY 10036

www.gilderlehrman.org