Tag Archives: Hiroshima

Best Online and Interactive International Museums

Very few educators can take their class, hope on an airplane, skirt through customs, and visit the Hague. Here is a brief list of great museums that have wonderful online exhibits that can help to bring the museum and its contents to your students. This list is hardly all inclusive, please add your own!!

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum – The purpose of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial is to record the events at Hiroshima and Nagasaki and to educate the populace about the horrors of nuclear warfare. The powerful museum has numerous online exhibits, videos, images, lesson plans, and more.

National Museum of Australia – One of the largest and most expansive museums in the world, the National Museum of Australia highlights the Natural Sciences, the Indigenous Peoples of Australia, and Art from around the world. Selected exhibits have interactive online components.

Anne Frank Museum – the online Anne Frank Museum includes documents in high resolution (including images), video, and a 3D tour of the apartment that housed the Frank house in Amsterdam.

The Uffizi Museum – The Digital Archives of the Uffizi museum are hosted online (not all works have been digitized, new pieces added regularly). This is an excellent tool to help students and educators explore the amazing art housed at this museum.

Rijksmuseum – The art from this Dutch museum has been catalogued, digitized, and put online. Each is accompanied with detailed history and, in some cases, external links and information. A wonderful site to explore.

British Museum – The British Museum is one of the largest and most expansive in the world. Selected exhibits are online.

The Hermitage Museum – The museum has a virtual tour of the museum online! You can now walk through the galleries (with 3D imagery) and examine individual works in their selected spaces.

The Louvre – The louvre also has virtual tours of the museum galleries. Walk through the halls and enjoy the art individually or as a collective whole.

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Today in History – The Bombing of Hiroshima (Aug 6, 1945)

Aerial Photograph of the Explosion at Hiroshima

At 8:16 am in the morning of August 6, 1945, the United States of America dropped the atomic bomb on the civilian town of Hiroshima. Three days later, the atomic bomb would be dropped on Nagasaki. On August 15, 1945 the Japanese would officially surrender, drawing the conflict in the Pacific to a close after four long and grueling years of battle.

The dropping of the bomb is one of the most controversial events in military history and Harry S Truman’s Presidency. The awesome power of the atomic bomb even haunted those that participated in its development – the famed “Manhattan Project.” Upon seeing the staggering destructive power of the bomb after its testing in New Mexico Kenneth Bainbridge, the testing director, leaned over and reportedly told his colleauges “Now we are all sons of bitches.” J. Robert Oppenheimer later recounted:

“We knew the world would not be the same. A few people laughed, a few people cried. Most people were silent. I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad-GitaVishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and, to impress him, takes on his multi-armed form and says, ‘Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.’ I suppose we all thought that, one way or another.”

The effects of the bomb were enduring and remains the only instance in which nuclear weapons were employed in armed conflict. The death toll in Hiroshima alone are estimated at between 90,000 – 165,000 people, half of whom died immediately from the explosion, approximately 25% within months after the blast from radiation poisoning, and the remaining (and hardest to determine accurately) from diseases (such as leukemia and other cancers) resulting from acute radiation exposure. It remains the most deadly single attack in military history.

To learn more about the bombing, check out the Wikipedia Article on the Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki as well as the “This Day in History” Article via History.com.