Tag Archives: Paleontology

Cooking a Nearly Two Million Year Old Practice

Recent excavations and analysis of the molars of Homo erectus and Homo sapiens neanderthalensis suggest that human ancestors began cooking much earlier than originally thought. The introduction of culturally treating food (specifically cooking) directly correlates to smaller molar size in human beings (as thick enamel and wide chewing surfaces are no longer necessary).

Paleoanthropologists have suggested that the the decreasing size of molars in proto-humans suggests that our ancestors were cooking as early as two million years ago. The finding, however, is not without controversy as the connection with cooking also suggest other sophisticated tool use – specifically the control of fire.

“There isn’t a lot of good evidence for fire. That’s kind of controversial,” Organ said. “That’s one of the holes in this cooking hypothesis. If those species right then were cooking you should find evidence for hearths and fire pits.” (MSNBC)

These new findings were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. If you do not have a subscription to this esteemed article, you can read more about it in this article of Scientific American or at MSNBC.

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Paleoanthropologists Uncover 20 Million Year Old Hominid Fossil

A team of Ugandan and French Paleoanthropologists have uncovered the remains of a 20 million year old Hominid Fossil in Uganda. The find is especially important as the skull is nearly complete – a rarity in fossilized remains.

“This is the first time that the complete skull of an ape of this age has been found. It is a highly important fossil,” Martin Pickford, a paleontologist from the College de France in Paris, told a news conference.

The skull was identified as belonging to a Ugandapithecus Major, an early relative to the great apes that inhabited the region. The early ape had a skull roughly the size of a chimpanzee, a highly intelligent primate. To read more about the find, read one of the articles at Discovery News, MSNBC, Daily Mail, or BBC News.

 

 

“Nutcracker Man” Primarily ate Grass

Paranthropos boisei, often termed the “nutcracker man” did not use his large jaw bones to crack nuts, but rather to chew grass.

Read about the new findings pertaining to this hominid in Discovery and Yahoo News.