Tag Archives: PEW

The Jobs of Today May not Exist Tomorrow – How do we Prepare Students?

Not long ago, I wrote a blog post entitled: Lifelong Learning is an Essential Skill, not a Buzzword. The more I read about future-readiness, 21st century skills, job market reports, and advances in technology (especially AI), the more I understand this to be true. Recently, PEW Research published a report on the Future of Jobs & Job Training.

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Courtesy of Gerd Leonhardhttps://www.flickr.com/photos/gleonhard/18732734804

This report reaffirmed the fact that in the near future, millions of jobs will be lost to automation and AI that can do these tasks not only just as well, but often better than their human counterparts. These are not just rudimentary, repeatable tasks, but sophisticated, white-collar jobs that have generally been considered “safe” from automation: dermatologists, journalists, claims adjusters, financial reporters, and more. With the rise of automated driving, millions of workers who rely on driving as their means of employment are looking at becoming obsolete (long-haul truck drivers, taxi drivers, delivery wo/men, and more).

Pushing aside the very real, and daunting, questions of what this means for our job market and even Capitalism, for educators and parents this means: how do we prepare students for the stark realities of an ever shifting job market? While new technologies may be depleting jobs, knowing how to leverage them will become an even more essential skill in the future.

“The education system will need to adapt to prepare individuals for the changing labor market. At the same time, recent IT advances offer new and potentially more widely accessible ways to access education.”

Looking at how and when people learn job skills and other training will also need to be examined. Will a traditional high school, college, and beyond model remain the default given the rapidly changing employment models?

“A central question about the future, then, is whether formal and informal learning structures will evolve to meet the changing needs of people who wish to fulfill the workplace expectations of the future.”

PEW delves deeply into this topic, asking experts about their vision of the future and determined 5 Major Themes:

Five major themes about the future of jobs training in the tech age

Considering the uncertainty of the future, what we do know is that we must prepare young people to be flexible and agile learners, critical thinkers, entrepreneurs and innovators, and to know that they must develop a passion and drive for lifelong learning.

While the article is long, I strongly encourage my readers to check out PEW’s publication and put together your own thoughts.

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Growing Number of Poor Americans are Phone Only Internet Users – What does that Mean for Education?

PEW Research recently published a study that showed a growing number of lower-income Americans access the internet solely through a smartphone. As many as 1 in 5 American children live at or below the poverty level and roughly half of all children qualify for free/reduced lunch, meaning that they live just above that poverty threshold (about $41K/year

for a family of four). If this trend continues, we should assume that a large portion of our nation’s children will have limited access to broadband and computers and will use a smart device for their internet access. What are the implications for education as teachers and schools move to more digital practices in their institutions?

Limited access to the internet or other resources is what we often call the “Digital Divide;” it often impacts students who are low-income, especially those in rural areas. There is no quick fix to addressing accessibility and broadband internet access is becoming less of a luxury and more of a necessity. What can educators do on an individual level to support students who are on the other side of the digital divide?

While on an individual level, teachers can be aware that many students in their classrooms do not have access to high speed internet or computers at home. They can also promote device agnostic tools (tools like G-Suite for Education can be installed on any device with near full-capability). Another potential option is that they can allow students to use class time and school resources to work on robust, digital assignments. However, teachers often feel powerless to help students when the problems facing students in the digital divide are so complex and need to be resolved at a macro-level.

There are a few attempts to address the digital divide. The e-rate program, which help to subsidize high speed internet in both urban and rural areas, has had a dramatic impact on bringing broad-band access to low-income as well as rural areas. However, even with this subsidy, students often have limited access at home. As the internet has become the primary repository of learning and knowledge, how can we ensure that all of our children have access?

Interactive Infographic – Compare Government Priorities Over the Past 13 Years

PEW Research has published an interactive infographic that highlights changing governmental priorities over the last 13 years. Viewers can sort priorities based on year, political affiliation, age, and gender (as well as look at the content overall). This is a great visualization of data for students and scholars of history and civics. Check out the free infographic and its resources here.

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Interactive Infographic: Public Trust in Government

Screen shot of infographic (to see the interactive version click on the link). Copyright PEW

Screen shot of infographic (to see the interactive version click on the link). Copyright PEW

The PEW Research Center has published an interactive infographic exploring the rise and fall of American Citizens’ trust in government. Explore the rise and fall of trust and distrust in the American Government since the 1960’s related to topics such as party affiliation, satisfaction, state, unemployment, and more. This is a great tool for exploring public opinion over the last five decades.

You can explore the infographic here.

Interactive Map of Global Indicators

Screenshot of Interactive Map, copyright PEW

Screenshot of Interactive Map, copyright PEW

The PEW Research center has recently published a new interactive map that highlights global indicators drawn from their database. Examine how the world’s opinion of President Barack Obama has changed over his presidency or the world’s opinion of China. The interactive map allows you to examine broad longitudinal data in depth and easily. Additionally, the visual data provides an easy way to comprehend the data.

This tool is entirely free and can help students and teachers alike explore complex topics. Check out the interactive map here.

Digital Tools Help Students’ Creativity & Writing Skills

In spite of popular believe, the results of a new PEW Survey indicate that digital tools improve student writing skills as well as social interactions. Of the AP and NWP (National Writing Project) teachers surveyed:

  • 96% agree (including 52% who strongly agree) that digital technologies “allow students to share their work with a wider and more varied audience”
  • 79% agree (23% strongly agree) that these tools “encourage greater collaboration among students”
  • 78% agree (26% strongly agree) that digital technologies “encourage student creativity and personal expression”

pie-chart-300x348While educators express a concern that students are more likely to take short-cuts in their writing or have spelling & grammatical errors, they feel more confident that these tools make it easier for them to help students shape and develop and their writing skills.

The findings of this survey are especially pertinent and relevant as critics of social media and technology often express concern about its potential impact on student writing and social skills.

To read the survey in its entirety, see PEW Internet & American Life Project. For a concise and excellent summary, see KQED’s Mind/Shift.