Tag Archives: Twitter

5 Free #EdTech Tools to Check out for Back to School

The start of school is just around the corner! Many educators are brushing off old lesson plans for revision or restructuring their curriculum. As you prepare for the start of school, here are five ed tech tools to check out to help get your lesson planning game on point.

Google Classroom

Google Classroom has become the go-to tool for educators to assign and collect

assignments, disseminate information, and even to keep parents informed. With some new, robust updates (better ways to navigate individual student work, transfer classes, team teach, and third party integration to name a few), it’s time to up your Classroom game. By using Google Classroom, you can easily keep student work in one place; no more emails entitled “homework” from personal emails you don’t recognize (e.g. “swimlover02@email.com”). Remember that Classroom is free and available to all (even if your school is not a G-Suite for Education institution). It really is worth a look!

Remind

Email is dead, it’s all about texting. In spite of this, our primary means of communication with students and parents remains email. Most teachers move around this by simply sharing their personal cell number and collecting them from students. Of course, this can be a real hindrance on privacy and can lead to concerns about appropriate boundaries. This is where Remind comes in. If your school is anything like mine, it’s fast moving and constantly changing. Remind is a great way to text students and parents important information (e.g. “due to snow day, test moved to Friday” or “Field-trip departure moved to side gate”). This does not require teachers, students, or parents to share their personal cell phone numbers. It also keeps a record of all texts that a teacher sends out. Privacy and boundaries protected!

Socrative

Capture

Socrative by MasteryConnect https://www.socrative.com/

Socrative has long been a favorite of educators. It’s a way to conduct reviews, run bell ringer or exit ticket activities, and otherwise gamify your classroom. Socrative has gone through several iterations. In addition to their free service, they now offer a “Pro” version ($59.99/year) that allows you to take your Socrative game to the next level. My students always enjoy days where we engage in Socrative activities; it allows them to show off what they know and tackle what they need to learn.

Quizlet

Now, you may be surprised to learn that I advocate a flashcard system. However, rote memorization still has a place in education. Whether you’re teaching geography, vocabulary, spelling, physics terms, or more, there will always be a place for flashcards. Quizlet has really become more robust than ever before. There are a number of ways to use Quizlet in your classroom. You can create sets yourself and share with your class in advance. Students can collaborate on sets. Quizlet now even lets you use your sets to engage in creative games (not just flashcards or matching).

Twitter

Twitter remains the go-to social network for teachers. If you are a Twitter user, it’s time to rejoin your chats and check out what your PLN is up to. If Twitter has been on your “To-Do” list, now is a great time to start! Check out my articles: “Effective Ways for Educators to Use Twitter” and “5 Ways for Teachers to Get Started on Twitter.” If you need to expand your “follow” list, here are some Great Educators & Institutions to Follow.

These are just 5 (Free) resources. There are many more. Please share your favorite in the comment section below!

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Effective Ways for Educators to Use Twitter

I am a big fan of using Twitter to share, collaborate, and learn. This infographic highlights many ways that educators can use Twitter in their practice.

infographic26 Effective Ways to use Twitter for Teachers and Educators Infographic
Find more education infographics on e-Learning Infographics

5 Ways for Teachers to get Started on Twitter

This is reblogged from my post on Daily Genius.

twitter-logo-765x477

Social Media and education have a complicated relationship. Most educators come into contact with it for the first time through a negative experience – a disciplinary action involving students or even peers. As such, many administrators have actively cautioned teachers against the use of Social Media, and many educators themselves have condemned Social Media as a mere distraction to education. However, much like other tools out there, the reality lies somewhere in between.

Let’s take Twitter as an example. If you’re unfamiliar with Twitter, it’s a microblogging platform. This means that users can share thoughts, links, and other information in short bursts of information (140 characters, plus links and/or media). In the last few years, Twitter has emerged as a powerful platform for educators. In fact, teachers make up a significant amount of the traffic volume on Twitter, and roughly 25% of educators are users of the platform. This makes Twitter an excellent platform for educators to connect with others, share, and learn. Here’s a quick guide to get you started.

Get on Twitter

This is the most obvious step – time to get an account! To start, go to twitter.comand sign up for an account. Create an avataraccount with your real name and set it to public; that’s right, limited privacy settings. Many of us have been taught to fear being ourselves online for everything from “stranger danger” to reprisal from employers. Your name is already available in the broad universe of the internet on a variety of media (try Googling it), so Twitter is really not a risky venture. Next, consider this yourprofessional account. This means you will be representing yourself as your best professional self, the way you would in a meeting at school or in the classroom. If you want to, set some personal boundaries to keep it professional (for example, no talking about politics or religion). Next, personalize your Twitter page – set a background photo and a profile photo. The default “egg” is a deterrent for many people to engage with you online. If you’re uncomfortable with it being a photo of yourself, consider an online caricature. For example, you can post an avatar of yourself (both Funko Pop and Simpsons characters are popular) or select a photo of a beloved pet or a vacation photo. Finally, download the free iOS or Android App for your phone and/or tablet to access Twitter on the go.

Explore the Interface

The interface is intentionally clean to make it easier to navigate. At the top, you will see the subjects: Home, Moments, Notifications, and Messages.

twitter interface

Your  “Home” screen will include Tweets posted chronologically (the newest at the top). In this feed, you will only see what the people who you follow publicly post. “Moments” highlights what is trending throughout all users as well as topics divided by subject. “Notifications” includes material directed at you – responses to your tweets, retweet notifications, follower notifications, and tweets directed directly to you. “Messages” are private messages between users – think of this like Instant Message. You will also see your number of tweets, people you follow, and your list of followers. On the left, there is a list of trending topics and hashtags (it will label those that are “promoted,” meaning someone has paid for them to be on this list).

Follow Users

Who should I follow? Is a common question. Start with people you know and admire – an educational leader (like the secretary of education John King, Ph.D.), authors, academics, publications, thought leaders, and more. Next, you can go to lists like Mashable’s 10 Rockstar Teachers on Twitter to help you get started and expand your list. Don’t worry about following a lot of people. Be selective (at least initially). Lurk, read, and observe what these individuals are doing. I also like to go and see who my idols are following on Twitter and find a few new gems for my Twitter Professional Learning Network (PLN). The more you observe on Twitter, the more your following will grow organically.

Hashtags

hashtagsNothing seems to cause more angst for newbies to Twitter than the concept of “hashtags.” Think of a hashtag as a way to categorize content on Twitter. For example, if I’m going to share something about a new feature in Google Docs, I will add the hashtag #GAFE (GAFE = Google Apps for Education) to my tweet. This will allow anyone searching for news on #GAFE to find my tweet. Within Twitter, hashtags are hyperlinked – if you click on one with a tweet, it will pull up all tweets with that hashtag (divided into “Top Tweets” and “All Tweets”). This can be a great way to keep up with a particular topic trending on Twitter. If you would like a list of educational hashtags, check out this post that catalogues hashtags by subject and content.

Share

The biggest hurdle for new Twitter users to overcome is actually sharing content! However, it’s vital for engaging with Retweetyour Professional Learning Network (PLN). You can share by “retweeting” a post. Do this by clicking the “retweet” button on a Twitter post to share and ensure that the original poster gets credit. Better yet, create and share your own content! Most newspapers and blogs now have a “share via…” button on their posts. This will allow you to share via a website itself which often automatically includes information such as a link and a title. You can then add your own text and hashtags (e.g. #edtech or #edchat) and then click share.

To create a post from scratch, click on the “post” button on your Home screen. The button looks like a quill on a square, in the top right corner of your screen. You can then add text, links, photos, video, and more in the tweet window. Though you are limited to 140 characters (excluding links), share away!

Once you get the hang of Twitter, you will see your PLN grow as you engage with others online, and you will probably find additional features on Twitter; check out more advanced lessons from Justin Reich in his article Teaching Teachers to Tweet. If you do, be sure to share your new tips and tricks with your PLN (on Twitter)!

Expand your PLN: Educators & Resources to Follow on Twitter

Twitter is an amazing resource for collaborating with colleagues. If you are looking to expand your PLN via Twitter this year, then check out this fabulous educators and education focused accounts on Twitter!

Educators

Patrick Larkin – Asst. Supt. for Burlington Massacdusettes Schools,  NASSP National Digital Principal Award Winner (2012).

Vicki Davis – Best teacher blog winner * Mom * Speaker * AUTHOR Reinventing Writing * HOST Every Classroom Matters * Top Teacher on Twitter

Jennie Magiera – CTO of , PLAYDATE co-founder, White House Champion of Change, Google Certified Innovator, Apple Distinguished Educator, TEDx speaker.

Susan Bearden – IT Director, . Co-moderator , . Bammy, Making IT Happen Award Winner. Creator . Blogger-speaker-consultant.

Lucy Gray – Apple Distinguished Educator Lucy Gray is an education technology and social media consultant; co-founder of the Global Education Conference.

Todd Nelson – Principal/Lead Learner at , White House Champion of Change,  Recipient, Co-Host of  & Co-Founder of 

Alec Couros – Professor of edtech & media, education researcher, consultant, connected educator, keynote speaker & open scholar – Faculty of Ed., University of Regina

Carl Hooker – Director of Innovation Eans ISD, CEO of @Hookertech, Godfather of @iPadpalooza, Speaker, ADE 2013, T&L Leader of the Year.

Felix Jacomino – Host of @MiamiDevice, Dir #EdTech at @ssedsorg in FL, 21st Century, PBL Advocate, PD Provider & Presenter.

Richard Wells – Author http://iPad4Schools.org, Speaker, Leader at NZ High #School. NZ eFellows15, Art grad. Apple edtech iPadEd – @huffPostEdu Top 10 Teacher Blog.

Tom Whitby – Author,Blogger, HS/MS Teachr 34 yrs, HigherEd 6 yrs. Founder #Edchat, EDU PLN, Edchat Radio, 6 Linkedin Edu Groups. BLOG My Island View http://tomwhitby.wordpress.com.

Jose Vilson – The teacher Gotham deserves. Author of This Is #NotATest. Founder of #EduColor. Race, class, education, teacher leadership, and my conscience.

Devorah Heitner – Raising Digital Natives • Digital Citizenship.

Bryan L. Miller – Director of EdTech @PineCrestSch~#PioNear~Keynote Presenter~Consultant~#FLEDChat Co-Moderater~Co-Founder @EdCampSoFlo

Jonathan Wylie – Educator & Technology Consultant for @GrantWoodAEA.

Doug Robertson – Sometimes I walk by children, tap them on the head, yell Goose! and run away. 5th grade Teacher, CUE Blog Editor.

Sarah Thomas – High school Tech Ed teacher. Lover of collaboration, liver of life. Passionate about using social media to connect w/ educators.

Michael Matera – World History teacher, @ASCD Emerging Leader 2015, Techie, Game Based Learning & Gamification sherpa.

Wesley Fryer – teacher, tech director, author, speaker, essentialist DE ’05-GCT ’09. @k12online & @EdCampOKC Organizer ATA @CasadySTEM @eyesrightblog

Adam Bellow – eduTecher / eduClipper / WeLearnedIt Founder, Educational Technologist, Edcamp Foundation Board Member.

Audrey Watters – writer @hackeducation (http://hackeducation.com ), ed-tech’s Cassandra, author of The Monsters of Education Technology.

Karen Blumberg – Do-gooder, NAIS Teacher of the Future, organizer (TEDx, EdCamp, RoboExpo), bargain shopper, traveler, and photographer living just enough for the city.

Angela Maiers – Speaker, Author, Educator. Founder @Choose2Matter. Driving the conversation on 21st century #leadership, #innovation, & digital media.

Organizations:

Hybrid Pedagogy – A Digital Journal of Learning, Teaching, and Technology / Critical Digital Pedagogy and New Media / Host of  Chat.

SmartBrief Education – Publishes and curates articles relevant to education.

FETC – FETC – Future of Education Technology Conference, a division of LRP Conferences, LLC, is one of the largest conferences in the U.S. devoted to .

ISTE – International Society for Technology Educators.

Huffington Post Education – An education news source and online hub for passionate voices.

Edutopia – Inspiration and information for what works in education.

Daily Genius – Helping teachers, students, parents, and everyone in education learn something new every day.

Products & Services:

EdTech K-12 Magazine – Ed Tech issues facing K–12 IT leaders, admins and educators.

Common Sense Educator – News, curricula, tips, and professional development for integrating technology in the classroom.

Google for Education – Helping prepare students to create the future. The best of Google, for education. Follow for product announcements, program updates and industry news.

Microsoft Education – Discovering, highlighting and enabling innovation and achievement among students, teachers and schools.

New York Times Learning Network – Teaching & Learning With The New York Times.

Top 100 Most Social K-12 Tech Leaders on Twitter

I was recently honored to learn I was included in the Huffington Post Tech article: “Top 100 Most Social K-12 Tech Leaders on Twitter.” I am especially honored when I see who they include on this list. Impresive group of people. If you are looking to expand your Twitter PLN, these are all great adds!

School rule-breakers to hand over Facebook and Twitter passwords

These policies are becoming more prevalent. They draw legitimate concerns about student privacy rights and are reminiscent of “locker searches” but on a much broader scale. Are these practices legal? Are they ethical? Do the ends justify the means?

Social Media is Learning Media

My last session of the day is “Social Media is Learning Media” by Patrick Larkin. I have seen Patrick’s work at iPad Summits for years and I’m excited to see him present again. I’m always excited to see administrators talk about Social Media in a positive, empowering way.

Patrick talks about the power of Social Media in his own career. When he was building technology programs at Burlington High School, there were not a lot of people doing similar work in Massachusetts or even the Northeast. Using Social Media enabled him to connect with other educators around the world. Education can be a lonely and isolating job; we spend most of our time with children and adolescents. Social Media can enable us to expand our experiences outside of the classroom, schools, and districts.

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Patrick begins by citing Will Richardson’s article, “My Kids are Illiterate. Most Likely, Yours are Too.” What he was talking about was the fact that kids these days are not able to use media in a meaningful way, to curate, asses, and analyze online content. For example, have you fallen for one of those online hoaxes, like “Modern Family Cancelled!” If you had basic digital literacy, you could have quickly assessed whether or not the source was valid (The Onion generally is not).

Patrick then explains his own journey with Twitter. He got online because he was told to check it out at a conference, but didn’t quite get it. However, when it they announced that the President was going to give a “big announcement”, he did a quick twitter search and learned before it went live that the announcement would be the death of bin Laden. You must know and understand how to assess a reputable source. People get duped all of the time. So we need to teach our kids how to assess online content.

As a principal at Burlington High School, Patrick focused on the school’s mission which included educating students to be good citizens. He then argued that students need to be good digital citizens as well.

As Patrick grew as an educator and administrator, he also learned the power of blogging. By posting blog articles about various tools and policies, others would reach out to him. When he first became a Principal, they had a no cell phone policy in the school. Teachers, however, were frustrated that students couldn’t use smartphones to do quick google searches or to look up content. So they changed their policy!

He then was able to guest post for Richard Byrnes on FreeTech4TEachers. As their programs expanded, he was able to host a respectful communication and commentary online via his Principal’s blog! He said that it also empowered them to celebrate their successes. With these web tools, you can put out good news every day, from classrooms to teachers to district wide!

In addition to posting a blog, learn to follow various blogs. I appreciate the shout out to mine Patrick! Using an RSS reader, you can set up your consumption tools. You can also tweet out content. Feedly is a great service for doing this.

Students can use these tools in powerful ways. “It’s amazing what students can do when we just step back a little!” What a powerful statement. We all went to “traditional” schools and classrooms, so backing off and allowing social learning to proceed can freak us out. Patrick notes that we can’t go without good educators, but that empowering students coupled with skilled educators.

Patrick also discusses with us how he created a Social Media PD day with his faculty. He sat them down over an hour, had them set up a twitter account, established a hashtag, and engaged in a twitter chat for an hour. That is just awesome! Patrick is a strong Twitter advocate. He tells us that you can find out anything you want on twitter. Check out the hashtag #edchat.

Social Media also makes us think about what learning environments look like. We can now take things out of the classroom. If a student is out of school for illness, they can Facetime with their partners and complete the assignment. students can physically leave a classroom and learn as a group in other environment.

Using tools like Google Drive, they were able to encompass more dynamic methods of teacher evaluations. Using 8 topics (listed above in his source tools), teachers could share their own examples of meeting those standards. Using a google form to assess walk-throughs.

Another great tool for administrative meeting is using Google Hangouts. I love Hangouts, they’re a great way to engage with users who are (physically) all over. They are now under the GAFE umbrella, which means you can use them with students. You can also check out unhangouts from MIT.

Patrick also highlights that we need to celebrate those who are willing to try and fail.

‘it’s no longer enough to do powerful work if no one sees it.” – Chris Lehmann. I also love Kevin Honeycutt’s “Stop being secret geniuses!” You need to share and engage with others. Participate in EdCamps, build your online presence, engage with others professionals.

Social Media often has a negative backlash. However, Patrick is quick to note that the issue is the person, not the tool. Bad people with bad intentions are going to use whatever tools available to them. Tools does not turn good people into monsters.