Protecting Student Data & Privacy Online – TrustE, COPPA Compliant

Securing student data and privacy is an important topic in the economy of educational technology. While the Federal Government has declared several guidelines via COPPA and FERPA, it is very tricky to know whether or not a company or organization adheres to these requirements. Many of them assert that schools/institutions are responsible for enforcing COPPA compliance.

A great tool for educators and institutions to determine a company’s abilityto protect student data is TrustE certification.

The TRUSTe Children’s Privacy Certification program certifies compliance with the COPPA Rule and meets the requirements of TRUSTe’s standard TRUSTed Websites Program, which include ongoing site monitoring and privacy dispute resolution.

After passing the certification process, members receive TRUSTe’s trusted web seals to display throughout their respective web pages. Client Service Managers provide seal placement guidance to ensure members are maximizing the impact of the seals. More than 25 million consumers click on these seals annually to confirm TRUSTe membership.

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Digital Zombie Series: “Notifistraction” Disease

Jennifer Carey:

Some great thoughts from Carl Hooker!

Originally posted on Hooked On Innovation:

Original Image here: http://goo.gl/XNgMhR

Original Image here: http://goo.gl/XNgMhR

Since the beginning of time, man has always had an innate sense of alertness.  In our primitive self, that alertness was used to make us aware of dangers around us.  Imagine it – you are hunting and gathering food when all the sudden, you happen upon a pond with fresh water.  You bend over to quench your thirst or possibly fill a jug with water for your family, when all of the sudden you hear a twig…

SNAP!!

You turn and look for what blood-crazed beast might be approaching you.  It turns out to be a smaller creature…like a squirrel (Look! Squirrel!).  Following  your expience with the varmint, you travel cautiously back to your cave having survived certain death.  When you arrive home to your wife and kids you discover that you left your jug full of water behind.  “What were you thinking?” she might ask (although back then it…

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Why & How to Green Screen in Class

If you haven’t check out iPad4Schools, then it’s time! Here are some great suggestions/outlines for bringing creativity in your classroom, but not letting it dominate it!

Finding interesting ways to evaluate, reflect and report on workand projects can be tricky. Many students struggle to engage with the reflection properly as it is often a dry, unentertaining end to any unit or project. But that’s where the Green Screen App can help. (How-to help sheet below)

Remember:
People don’t learn from experience.
People learn when reflecting on experience.
People learn more when they can witness their own reflection.

It’s not all about being Superman!

Hopscotch Green Screen reportBeing able to place moving images as well as still behind the student reporter / reflector makes the report far more engaging for the viewer….

Read more here:

Why & How to Green Screen in class.

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Free Webcasts for Plagiarism Education Week (April 21-25)

Plagiarism Education Week is April 21-25. Turnitin.com is hosting a series of free webcasts to highlight methods to combat plagiarism from pre-emptive education, structuring assignments, and addressing the issue after the fact. Topics include:

To learn more about Plagiarism Education, enroll, or participate, visit their blog post here.

Turnitin-PEW-Logo-2014-Hor-Lg

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Pew Research – Millennials and Libraries

PEW Research presents interesting data on Millennials and Libraries.

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Infographic: How the Internet is Revolutionizing Education

We can all agree that, for better or worse, the internet is having a profound impact on education. I believe that the growing pains we are currently experiencing with new technologies will ultimately change how we teach, assess, and access education in both K-12 as well as Higher Education. The infographic below, created by OnlineEducation.net highlights that most radical impacts the Internet has had on education. You can read more about this via Edudemic here.

internet-revolutionizing-education-small

Posted in Digital Citizenship, Education, Educational Resources, Educational Technology, Higher Education, Public Education, Teachers, Technology | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

How to Infuse Digital Literacy Throughout Your Curriculum

This is reblogged from my post on PLPVoices.

digital-literacy-250So how are we doing on the push to teach “digital literacy” across the K12 school spectrum? From my perspective as a school-based technology director and history teacher, I’d say not as well as we might wish – in part because our traditional approach to curriculum and instruction wants to sort everything into its place.

Digital literacy is defined as “the ability to effectively and critically navigate, evaluate, and create information using a range of digital technologies.” Many educational and business professional cite is as a critical 21st century skill. Even so, many schools have struggled to adapt it into their curriculum.

This is often because most institutions already have rigorous, established curricula with little wiggle room – and this is especially true in schools subject to state and federal testing. Content becomes king. However, there are ways that schools can adapt these skills into existing structures – integrating them into their current pedagogical framework.

Evaluating online content is a research skill

Administrators often tell me they cannot meet new digital literacy requirements because they cannot add a “digital literacy” course or requirement. Here’s the other way: the need for students to “critically navigate and evaluate” online content is better viewed as an extension of research skills. Just as we don’t teach a class called “research,” we do not need to teach “evaluating online content” as a separate course or unit of study. We should teach research skills in the context of existing subject matter.

For example, when my students do research in US History, they are not only allowed butencouraged to use online content. However, when using internet material (as opposed to a peer reviewed article or an academic book), they need to include further evaluation of the content.

CRAAPtest-visualOne of my favorite tools to use in doing this is the CRAAP test developed by the University of California at Chico. This method requires students to evaluate a source based on its Currency, Relevance, Authority, Accuracy, and Purpose. In fact, this method could easily be applied to “traditional” sources as well. (Here’s a public source handout.)

With the rise of academics who write blogs and use social media (such as Twitter and Facebook), and given the wealth of self-published content generally, pertinent information is now moving away from traditional forms. A student in science can learn a great deal from Neil Degrass Tyson’s Podcast; in fact, it’s likely a more accessible medium for young students than his published articles. Additionally, students need to know what online content they can reproduce and how to credit it properly (digital ethics).

The problem students face in the new world is no longer access to information, but rather how to deal with the glut of content that confronts them when they google a research topic. If we want them to effectively navigate online material (as 21st century learners), then research now needs to include not only “traditional” methods and materials, but digital ones as well. We need to ensure that they know how to evaluate a website, a blog post, a tweet, a Facebook entry. These evaluative skills transfer cross curricularly and prepare students for the broader world of online communication.

Engaging online is a modern communication skill

Engaging in effective discourse and debate is a necessary skill that many of us learned in school via class discussions, group activities, classroom debates, in class presentations, etc. Being able to effectively communicate is a requirement to success in many facets of life (academia, business, personal life, etc).

In our emerging digital world, a new medium of exchange has developed: online engagement, especially via social media. Effectively engaging online requires a myriad of skills that we strive to foster in school – effective written communication, brevity and civility. These components are often highlighted in Digital Citizenship programs, but in tradition-bound K12 education, we often deride social media as trite or ineffective.

Brian-MuseHowever, social media use has quickly grown in professional and academic realms. I recently had a conversation with a friend from my high school days, Brian Muse. Brian is a successful attorney with a practice focused on the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act). The primary focus of our conversation was the role that social media plays in Brian’s practice.

Even I (an avid proponent of the power of online engagement) was surprised at how much value Brian and his peers put on social media. In addition to maintaining an active Twitter account (with the full encouragement of his firm), he also writes a blog on relevant ADA law.

Brian told me that social media, especially Twitter, is an effective tool for legal professionals in several ways: networking, branding, and research. As an attorney in a dynamic field, it’s his job to predict where the law is going; Twitter serves as an effective crowdsourcing medium for him to take the pulse of labor law. His online presence and engagement (through his blog and Twitter account) allows him to share his knowledge with others and has led to several referrals from attorneys or chambers of commerce.

Speaking both a professional and a parent, Brian told me: “Any child that graduates high school with these skills will have such a leg up in this business world.”

Just as we anticipate that the traditional communication skills we teach children as part of our established curriculum will translate to a broader skill set, so will their ability to engage with people safely and effectively online. Likewise, just as we do not need to establish a separate curriculum or class for “digital literacy,” we can incorporate updated 21st century communication skills across our established curricular models.

Students need to create. Projects become digital.

If you are familiar with the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy, then you know that creation is at the highest order of learning. Teachers recognize this; it’s why we give students various projects and assignments: a science experiment, a research essay, a model UN debate, etc. With new technologies, students have the ability to create dynamic, multi-media projects quickly and easily. By combining these tools with a sophisticated topic, we can engage students in new and creative ways.

For example, my history students make documentaries for class. This project requires that they perform sophisticated research (using both traditional and digital resources), incorporate a variety of media (images, video, sound, etc), they must write, and then they present/peer review in class. This modernized research project addresses all of the elements of digital literacy in my classroom yet doesn’t require additional in or out of class time to implement. It is an effective way to engage my students in effective, 21st century learning.

One reason that teachers are often hesitant to adopt new technologies or give students digitally enhanced assignments is because they themselves are unfamiliar with the available tools – and suppose that giving a “Movie Project” requires that they teach about movie making software. I try to encourage my faculty to “let go.” Tell the students what the final project should look like (such as a video) and then tell them to pick the venue that works best for them to create a finished project.

New technology is easy to use/navigate and with YouTube and online blogs, students can easily teach themselves how to use them. Now this doesn’t mean that faculty should not learn these new tools. In fact, I often challenge my faculty to use MovieMaker for their laptops or iMovie on their iPads to create a video of anything they want (their children, a pet, a favorite sports team).

Not only do they discover how easy it is to use the software, they see how quickly they can overcome any hurdles they encounter in the process. In fact, I often tout creative problem solving as important skill for students to develop – projects like this help them to develop those skills.

Digital Literacy: An everyday dimension of learning

Digital Literacy is a crucial skill that we as educators must foster and encourage in our classrooms (and administrators must support in the broader curriculum). I hope that these examples have helped to demonstrate how 21st century skills do not require additional class time or new course development. They often do require some tweaking of our established curricula.

I strongly encourage administrators to provide robust professional development and learning time for their staff and faculty. Your teachers can integrate digital literacy into everyday learning, provided you share the resources and support they need to shift a traditional curriculum to a more innovative one. If you do, our students will be better digital citizens and curators of online content; a necessary skill for success in the 21st century and a valuable contribution to civil society.

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Flipping your Professional Development

This past weekend, I had the privilege of being an invited guest of Dr. Will Deyamport on his weekly podcasts, “The Dr. Will Show.” The subject of the conversation was flipping your professional development. I recently wrote an article, “Flip your PD for Greater Flexibility and Support.” Our conversation was excellent – we discussed the role that flipped pd plays in training faculty and supporting them in their professional development. You can see the full video below:

I also encourage you to check out Will’s blog for more resources on educational technology.

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Tip of the Week: 100+ map and chart visuals that jump-start discussion

Jennifer Carey:

Some great resources!

Originally posted on History Tech:

It’s no secret. I love maps. I’m pretty sure maps love me. Big. Small. Old. New. Treasure.

I love ‘em all.

And the cool thing about the InterWebs is that someone is always making new maps that I can fall in love with. Recently it’s been the Washington Post.

We’re all visual people and the brain loves to look at stuff. So all of the maps and charts listed below would work great as writing prompts, hook activities to introduce units and lessons, resources for research, basic geography skills, part of PBL projects, or to simply act as a sweet way to jump-start a current events discussion.

But I’m also sure that you come up with all sorts of things that I haven’t thought about. (Don’t forget to use the links associated with each map to help your kids explore deeper.)

Here we go:

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Great Blogs & People on Twitter for Educators to Follow

Teachers often come to me and say that they have heard of a PLN (Personal Learning Network) and that they want to start following relevant blogs and even to start getting involved on Twitter. However, starting always seems a bit overwhelming. I have put together a short list of blogs and Individuals/Organizations on Twitter that are a great place for educators to start. After you get a handle on it, be sure to expand that PLN to subjects and people that pique your interest and address your specific needs.

Great Blogs for Educators:

General Education Blogs:

Ed Tech Blogs:

People & Organizations to Follow on Twitter

General Education News

Educational Technology

Innovative Educators

Great Technology Tools

This is just a simple list to get you started. After you get a feel for how a PLN works, expand your list to include people and organizations that are relevant to you. After all, it’s your PLN!

Posted in Education, Educational Resources, Educational Technology, Professional Development, Social Media, Teachers, Technology | Tagged , , , , , , , | 3 Comments