Martin Luther King Day – A Fort Worth Story

Today as I was pursuing the stories of my local news, I came across an interesting story about Civil Rights, segregation, and violent bigotry. Fort Worth, Texas is not a town that comes to mind when one things about the Civil Rights movement or Jim Crow south. However, like all cities and towns in the south, we have our stories – good and bad.

Downtown Fort Worth in the 1920s (less than a decade after the riot).Courtesy of Wikimedia

Downtown Fort Worth in the 1920s (less than a decade after the riot).
Courtesy of Wikimedia

Today, Bud Kennedy relates the story of race riots in 1913 Downtown Fort Worth, sparked by a movie theatre, “The Dixie” that was the first and only “Black’s Only” movie theatre in Downtown Fort Worth. Violence erupted, the theatre was destroyed, and African-Americans were assaulted on their Sunday morning walks to church. The event was then covered up by the local press as an incident resulting from “poor parenting.”

To read more about the story and history of this dark event in Fort Worth, see the article: “History reminds of the true meaning of the MLK Holiday” at the Fort Worth Star-Telegram

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About Jennifer Carey

My name is Jennifer Carey and I am a student and educator of the human condition. I have long studied history, trained in archaeology, and found a passion in the field of education. As a long-time lover of technology (my father bought our family our first Apple IIe when I was three), I love technology and what it can bring to the classroom. I have taught at various Universities for many years as well as educating gifted teenagers through the Johns Hopkins program, the Center for Talented Youth. I am currently the Director of Educational Technology at the Ransom Everglades School (a secular independent school) in Miami, Fl. I also have a few educational podcasts on iTunes from my days teaching at TCU: The Ancient City of Rome, Classical Archaeology (2008), Classical Archaeology (2009), Introduction to Classical Myth, and Ancient Eats. They’re enhanced (so you get the PowerPoints along with the vocal), but please excuse the poor audio editing. Feel free to Email Me or follow me on twitter.
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2 Responses to Martin Luther King Day – A Fort Worth Story

  1. I’m grateful that you are helping eradicate revisionist history: “The event was then covered up by the local press as an incident resulting from “poor parenting.” Thank goodness you are a history teacher and undoing some of the amazing harm of history texts.

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