Category Archives: Technology

4 Math Add-Ons for Google Docs

This is reblogged from my post on FreeTech4Teachers.

Google Docs is a popular word processing tool. However, many people don’t realize that there are 4 great add-ons for Math that allow teachers and students to harness the power of Google. You can add any of these features to a Google Doc by selecting Add-ons → Get Add-ons.


g(Math) is a popular tool for Math students and teachers. It allows you to create robust expressions and graphs that you can insert directly into your Google Doc. Input expressions using LaTeX, select pre-built formulas which gMath will convert to LaTeX for you, draw your own formula, or even speak to insert math equations (in Chrome Only). Check out the g(Math) guru for extensive tutorials.


Sometimes you just need a simple calculator to check your work or perform calculations. Add a calculator to any Google Doc by adding… read the rest of this article at FreeTech4Teachers.

Do Micro-credentials Have Value?

Jennifer Carey:

This is prominent topic today in education. Where and how do courses, like MOOCs, fit in traditional and professional education?

Originally posted on Archaeology, Museums & Outreach:

stoneAt the University of Memphis, there is not a good course offering on writing skills for graduate students.  In my anecdotal and formal evaluation experiences, poor written and verbal communication skills are a serious deficit for our college graduates.  There are a half-dozen or so MOOC offerings that address written communication on various levels.  I came across one called High Impact Business Writing reviewed the overall content and thought  the offering was appropriate for one of my students in particular.  I then noted that the course was part of a Career Readiness specialization of offerings that seemed to address aspects of training the student would find useful based on their career interest in museum administration.

When I reviewed the suite of nine courses in the specialization, I realized that much of the content expands on what I now cover with all of my advisees in our biweekly workshop meetings.  I…

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Wikipedia is your friend and so is this awesome timeline

Jennifer Carey:

I cannot tell you how much I whole-heartedly agree with this!

Originally posted on History Tech:

We’ve had the discussion before. Wikipedia is not evil. Wikipedia is not revisionist history. Wikipedia is not an attempt by SPECTRE to take over the world. It’s just an encyclopedia, just one of the many online tools useful for quick overviews of basic foundational knowledge.

And for settling bar bets, of course.

So . . . Wikipedia is your friend. It really is. As is World Book. And Encyclopedia Britannica.

And if you feel comfortable agreeing with that statement, go ahead. Click the Read More link. Cause I’ve got a very cool interactive Wikipedia-based timeline that you need to check out. If you’re not comfortable with the Wiki idea, I’m okay with that. You might enjoy Scholarpedia or Infoplease as alternatives.

But you won’t get the cool timeline tool. Just saying.

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PEW – Teens & Technology

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

PEW Research has released a comprehensive report on how teens engage with technology in the world around them. The information is a view into the private lives of “networked teens.”

The topics they tackle are online engagement, cyberbullying, teen romantic relationships, their relationship with parents, and more. Most of the information should come as a relief to parents and educators. For example, in spite of hyped cyber-bullying reports in the news, 69% of teens believe that people are “mostly kind” when they engage online. Also, when it comes to Romance, teens still prefer to engage with those they know in real life; retaining a healthy skepticism towards individuals they meet online. Social Media, however, does seem to be a forum for flirtatious exchanges. And breaking up? Doing it in person is still the most socially acceptable method.

You can read the comprehensive report and data at PEW Research: Teens & Technology.

Learning with Liquid Text

This is reblogged from my post at FreeTech4Teachers.

I was recently introduced to a new and innovative document annotation tool for the iPad. LiquidText allows you to import PDF files, web pages, Word, and PowerPoint files from websites and cloud services (like DropBox, Google Drive, iCloud, and more). Similar to traditional annotation tools, you can highlight and take notes in the margins. However, LiquidText goes so much farther! In addition to traditional comments, you can make a comment apply to two sections, connect comments into groups, or even comment on other comments! You can highlight and then pull out excerpts of text for further comment. You can “scrunch” documents so that you can compare text on different pages side by side, and “pinch” the document so that you can see all of your highlights and comments on one page so that you can quickly find your notes.

When you finish annotating a document, you can share the… [read the rest of the post on FreeTech4Teachers]

Expand your PLN: Educators & Resources to Follow on Twitter

Twitter is an amazing resource for collaborating with colleagues. If you are looking to expand your PLN via Twitter this year, then check out this fabulous educators and education focused accounts on Twitter!


Patrick Larkin – Asst. Supt. for Burlington Massacdusettes Schools,  NASSP National Digital Principal Award Winner (2012).

Vicki Davis – Best teacher blog winner * Mom * Speaker * AUTHOR Reinventing Writing * HOST Every Classroom Matters * Top Teacher on Twitter

Jennie Magiera – CTO of , PLAYDATE co-founder, White House Champion of Change, Google Certified Innovator, Apple Distinguished Educator, TEDx speaker.

Susan Bearden – IT Director, . Co-moderator , . Bammy, Making IT Happen Award Winner. Creator . Blogger-speaker-consultant.

Lucy Gray – Apple Distinguished Educator Lucy Gray is an education technology and social media consultant; co-founder of the Global Education Conference.

Todd Nelson – Principal/Lead Learner at , White House Champion of Change,  Recipient, Co-Host of  & Co-Founder of 

Alec Couros – Professor of edtech & media, education researcher, consultant, connected educator, keynote speaker & open scholar – Faculty of Ed., University of Regina

Carl Hooker – Director of Innovation Eans ISD, CEO of @Hookertech, Godfather of @iPadpalooza, Speaker, ADE 2013, T&L Leader of the Year.

Felix Jacomino – Host of @MiamiDevice, Dir #EdTech at @ssedsorg in FL, 21st Century, PBL Advocate, PD Provider & Presenter.

Richard Wells – Author, Speaker, Leader at NZ High #School. NZ eFellows15, Art grad. Apple edtech iPadEd – @huffPostEdu Top 10 Teacher Blog.

Tom Whitby – Author,Blogger, HS/MS Teachr 34 yrs, HigherEd 6 yrs. Founder #Edchat, EDU PLN, Edchat Radio, 6 Linkedin Edu Groups. BLOG My Island View

Jose Vilson – The teacher Gotham deserves. Author of This Is #NotATest. Founder of #EduColor. Race, class, education, teacher leadership, and my conscience.

Devorah Heitner – Raising Digital Natives • Digital Citizenship.

Bryan L. Miller – Director of EdTech @PineCrestSch~#PioNear~Keynote Presenter~Consultant~#FLEDChat Co-Moderater~Co-Founder @EdCampSoFlo

Jonathan Wylie – Educator & Technology Consultant for @GrantWoodAEA.

Doug Robertson – Sometimes I walk by children, tap them on the head, yell Goose! and run away. 5th grade Teacher, CUE Blog Editor.

Sarah Thomas – High school Tech Ed teacher. Lover of collaboration, liver of life. Passionate about using social media to connect w/ educators.

Michael Matera – World History teacher, @ASCD Emerging Leader 2015, Techie, Game Based Learning & Gamification sherpa.

Wesley Fryer – teacher, tech director, author, speaker, essentialist DE ’05-GCT ’09. @k12online & @EdCampOKC Organizer ATA @CasadySTEM @eyesrightblog

Adam Bellow – eduTecher / eduClipper / WeLearnedIt Founder, Educational Technologist, Edcamp Foundation Board Member.

Audrey Watters – writer @hackeducation ( ), ed-tech’s Cassandra, author of The Monsters of Education Technology.

Karen Blumberg – Do-gooder, NAIS Teacher of the Future, organizer (TEDx, EdCamp, RoboExpo), bargain shopper, traveler, and photographer living just enough for the city.

Angela Maiers – Speaker, Author, Educator. Founder @Choose2Matter. Driving the conversation on 21st century #leadership, #innovation, & digital media.


Hybrid Pedagogy – A Digital Journal of Learning, Teaching, and Technology / Critical Digital Pedagogy and New Media / Host of  Chat.

SmartBrief Education – Publishes and curates articles relevant to education.

FETC – FETC – Future of Education Technology Conference, a division of LRP Conferences, LLC, is one of the largest conferences in the U.S. devoted to .

ISTE – International Society for Technology Educators.

Huffington Post Education – An education news source and online hub for passionate voices.

Edutopia – Inspiration and information for what works in education.

Daily Genius – Helping teachers, students, parents, and everyone in education learn something new every day.

Products & Services:

EdTech K-12 Magazine – Ed Tech issues facing K–12 IT leaders, admins and educators.

Common Sense Educator – News, curricula, tips, and professional development for integrating technology in the classroom.

Google for Education – Helping prepare students to create the future. The best of Google, for education. Follow for product announcements, program updates and industry news.

Microsoft Education – Discovering, highlighting and enabling innovation and achievement among students, teachers and schools.

New York Times Learning Network – Teaching & Learning With The New York Times.

Free Mystery Skype Curriculum for Schools

Jennifer Carey:

Some great information here about how you can use Skype in your classroom.

Originally posted on Jonathan Wylie: Instructional Technology Consultant:

mystery skype curriculum

Do you use Mystery Skype in your classroom? If so, you are probably familiar with how it works, but if you are looking for some extra tips, or want to get some other teachers involved, you should check out the new Mystery Skype Curriculum that Microsoft has put together for teachers who are connecting their classrooms all around the world.

The curriculum is free for anyone who wants to use it, but you do need a Microsoft account in order to sign in and view the latest version. Microsoft accounts are free, and you may already have one if you have a Hotmail or email address. For some reason Office 365 for School accounts do not seem to be supported, but this may have changed by the time you read this blog post.

The curriculum is in the form of a OneNote notebook. OneNote, if you don’t already know…

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