Tag Archives: Education

Education PD: Courses from Colleges of Education

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

iTunes U has published a collection of free, online courses on a variety of topics from several prominent Colleges of Education. These courses cover topics such as educational technology, student engagement, special education, and more.

You can access the whole list via this link.

Free iTunes U Resources on Digital Citizenship & Literacy

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

As Digital Citizenship & Literacy becomes more important in schools, it’s necessary for educators to become more familiar with the current best practices, legal requirements, and lesson plans. iTunes U (one of my favorite tools) offers a number of books, resources, and free digital classes to help you become more informed and to craft effective lesson plans and strategies to share in the classroom.

Resources include a variety of books from Common Sense Media, courses from Saint Ignatius High School and University of Britain, as well as in class apps and tools. You can find the whole list of resources here

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Protecting Student Privacy in the Digital World

This year, I had the privilege of collaborating with other professionals in my field: Thelma Almuena, the Principal of Columbia Elementary, George Philip, teacher and technology integrationist at the Stanley Clark School, and Ana Albir, founder and CEO of Drawp Entertainment and creator of Drawp for Schools. We have put together a panel proposal for SXSWedu 2016 conference focusing on student privacy in the digital age. I hope you will support our session and vote for it to be accepted. You can vote for our session via this link:

http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/vote/48239

If you do not have a SXSWedu account, you can create one here.

Our session summary is:

With ubiquitous classroom technology, students’ privacy is an increasing concern. Federal laws, such as the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, are difficult to navigate but vital to protecting students’ rights. This panel will focus on demystifying the process, providing key strategies for lawfully implementing technology, and looking to the future of technology and education. Panelists include technology and school administrative leaders (at both public and private schools) as well as a software developer for PK-elementary tools.

Questions Answered

  1. Gain an understanding of current Federal Privacy Laws that apply to schools.
  2. Understand how to vet and implement technology tools in schools.
  3. Understand the direction that privacy and educational technology will take in the future.

Speakers

Organizer

Jennifer Carey Ransom Everglades School

Free Mystery Skype Curriculum for Schools

Jennifer Carey:

Some great information here about how you can use Skype in your classroom.

Originally posted on Jonathan Wylie: Instructional Technology Consultant:

mystery skype curriculum

Do you use Mystery Skype in your classroom? If so, you are probably familiar with how it works, but if you are looking for some extra tips, or want to get some other teachers involved, you should check out the new Mystery Skype Curriculum that Microsoft has put together for teachers who are connecting their classrooms all around the world.

The curriculum is free for anyone who wants to use it, but you do need a Microsoft account in order to sign in and view the latest version. Microsoft accounts are free, and you may already have one if you have a Hotmail or Outlook.com email address. For some reason Office 365 for School accounts do not seem to be supported, but this may have changed by the time you read this blog post.

The curriculum is in the form of a OneNote notebook. OneNote, if you don’t already know…

View original 291 more words

Leave Voice Comments in Google Docs with Kaizena

This is reblogged from my post on Daily Genius.

kaizena

I recently returned from the 2015 annual ISTE Conference in Philadelphia. It’s always exciting to learn about the new tools and features that are available to educators and students. One of my favorite tools on the market is Kaizena, a tool that you can use to give audio feedback to students in addition to coordinating your feedback with rubrics and learning tools. You can learn more about the advanced features of Kaizena, here. While at ISTE, I learned that Kaizena launched a new tool that will allow teachers to add voice comments far more easily and much faster! Kaizena has recently introduced their “Kaizena Mini” add-on that will allow you to leave voice comments and written notes on students’ documents within Google Docs itself. This way, you do not have to launch a third party tool to apply these features.

HOW TO LEAVE VOICE COMMENTS IN GOOGLE DOCS

AddOnsInstall Kaizena Mini Add-On

While inside of the document you would like to annotate with voice comments, simply go to Menu → Add-ons → Get Add-ons. When the Add-On window launches, simply search for “Kaizena.” Next, click on the “+ FREE” next to the Kaizena Mini Add-on, and follow the instructions to install the software on your account.

KaizenaOpen Kaizena Mini

With the software installed, simply go to Add-ons → Kaizena Mini → Open Kaizena Mini. This will launch the mini recorder on the right hand side. You should select that you are “giving feedback” and then choose the person receiving feedback from the menu (or add someone not listed), and then click continue. To leave feedback, highlight a portion of the text and click “+ New Feedback.” You can then select a voice comment, text comment, or even insert a link.

Leave voice omments

Once you have finished adding voice comments, the user will see the highlights on the document and be directed to open Kaizena Mini in order to hear the corresponding feedback. This is a great way to leave not just text but also audio feedback on student work while never having to leave Google Docs! Voice comments are a great way to provide in-depth and individualized feedback and, using the Kaizena mini recorder, you can do so faster than ever.

EdTechTeacher leads Google Workshops throughout the Summer and a few Google Jamborees during the School Year. However, you can always connect with us on twitter via #ettgoogle or learn more on ourGoogle Apps for Education Resources page.

How to create and collaborate (yes, really) online with Microsoft Excel

This is reblogged from my post on Daily Genius.

Office365-Excel-3

Until recently, in the world of online collaboration, Microsoft has been decidedly lacking. However, they have made impressive strides in online and cloud computing tools over the past year. For example, you can now easily create, edit, and collaborate on Excel spreadsheets and workbooks.

This can be accomplished using the new Office Online orOffice 365. It’s important to note that while Office Online is free, Office 365 is a paid resource ($99/year home and $69/year personal annual subscription; K-12 institutions have their own pricing tiers) and will give you greater access to resources, including free full-use of Mobile and Computer apps.

Microsoft recently extended its educational Microsoft Office license to include its online 365 service for free to schools. This means that if your school has a Microsoft license, you already have access to this tool. Just check with your IT administrative team to learn how to log on and access it.

Office365-Excel-1, EdTechTeacher

Navigating Office Online is a little different than the local tools on your computer. However, they are quick to figure out. To log in, go toOffice.com (if you have a free Microsoft account or Office 365 account) or go to login.live.com to create an account. Today, we’re going to explore Excel, so click on the Excel icon to get started.

EXCEL: MORE THAN A BASIC SPREADSHEET

A new window will open and, just like the desktop version, you will be given the option to access your recent workbooks or to create a new one using one of Excel’s workbook or spreadsheet templates. If you select a workbook that you have recently been working on, then you will need to click on Edit workbook → Edit in Excel Online (for collaborative features) or Edit in Excel (to open on your desktop for more advanced functionality).

Once you do this, you will have access to many of Excel’s robust tools. You can can format spreadsheets and columns, include complex functions, create charts and graphs, and more! With a school or paid-for subscription to Office 365, you even have unlimited storage for working with Excel online.

OOffice365-Excel-1, EdTechTeacherne of the best features of Office Online and Office 365, however, is something that you won’t find on the traditional Microsoft desktop tools (at least not yet): the ability to collaborate in real time with others! No more emailing a file back and forth, you can simply click the “share” icon and either share via email address with view or edit privileges or share with a link (again view or edit privileges).

If you share via a link with editing privileges, the other user does not even need an Office Online or Office 365 account! This is a great way to collaborate with others who don’t have access to Microsoft products.

All of your changes are saved automatically in the cloud, so it’s perfect for a Mobile environment where you’re always on the go. The workbook will be stored in yourOneDrive, so you can access it anywhere (online, app on your tablet or smartphone, or any computer)! The new Office Online tools extend Microsoft’s robust document editing tool to the web and is accessible from any device

COME COLLABORATE THIS SUMMER!

  • Workshop for That, EdTechTeacher Summer WorkshopsGoogle & Web Tools in the Student-Centered Classroom
  • The Chromebook Classroom
  • The iPad Classroom
  • And More!

View the Full Course Catalog at ettsummer.org

Featured image by Apollo Zeus via Flickr cc