Tag Archives: Educational Resources

Expand your PLN: Educators & Resources to Follow on Twitter

Twitter is an amazing resource for collaborating with colleagues. If you are looking to expand your PLN via Twitter this year, then check out this fabulous educators and education focused accounts on Twitter!

Educators

Patrick Larkin – Asst. Supt. for NASSP National Digital Principal Award Winner (2012).

Vicki Davis – Best teacher blog winner * Mom * Speaker * AUTHOR Reinventing Writing * HOST Every Classroom Matters * Top Teacher on Twitter

Jennie Magiera – CTO of , PLAYDATE co-founder, White House Champion of Change, Google Certified Innovator, Apple Distinguished Educator, TEDx speaker.

Susan Bearden – IT Director, . Co-moderator , . Bammy, Making IT Happen Award Winner. Creator . Blogger-speaker-consultant.

Lucy Gray – Apple Distinguished Educator Lucy Gray is an education technology and social media consultant; co-founder of the Global Education Conference.

Todd Nelson – Principal/Lead Learner at , White House Champion of Change,  Recipient, Co-Host of  & Co-Founder of 

Alec Couros – Professor of edtech & media, education researcher, consultant, connected educator, keynote speaker & open scholar – Faculty of Ed., University of Regina

Carl Hooker – Director of Innovation Eans ISD, CEO of @Hookertech, Godfather of @iPadpalooza, Speaker, ADE 2013, T&L Leader of the Year.

Felix Jacomino – Host of @MiamiDevice, Dir #EdTech at @ssedsorg in FL, 21st Century, PBL Advocate, PD Provider & Presenter.

Richard Wells – Author http://iPad4Schools.org, Speaker, Leader at NZ High #School. NZ eFellows15, Art grad. Apple edtech iPadEd – @huffPostEdu Top 10 Teacher Blog.

Tom Whitby – Author,Blogger, HS/MS Teachr 34 yrs, HigherEd 6 yrs. Founder #Edchat, EDU PLN, Edchat Radio, 6 Linkedin Edu Groups. BLOG My Island View http://tomwhitby.wordpress.com.

Jose Vilson – The teacher Gotham deserves. Author of This Is #NotATest. Founder of #EduColor. Race, class, education, teacher leadership, and my conscience.

Devorah Heitner – Raising Digital Natives • Digital Citizenship.

Bryan L. Miller – Director of EdTech @PineCrestSch~#PioNear~Keynote Presenter~Consultant~#FLEDChat Co-Moderater~Co-Founder @EdCampSoFlo

Jonathan Wylie – Educator & Technology Consultant for @GrantWoodAEA.

Doug Robertson – Sometimes I walk by children, tap them on the head, yell Goose! and run away. 5th grade Teacher, CUE Blog Editor.

Sarah Thomas – High school Tech Ed teacher. Lover of collaboration, liver of life. Passionate about using social media to connect w/ educators.

Michael Matera – World History teacher, @ASCD Emerging Leader 2015, Techie, Game Based Learning & Gamification sherpa.

Wesley Fryer – teacher, tech director, author, speaker, essentialist DE ’05-GCT ’09. @k12online & @EdCampOKC Organizer ATA @CasadySTEM @eyesrightblog

Adam Bellow – eduTecher / eduClipper / WeLearnedIt Founder, Educational Technologist, Edcamp Foundation Board Member.

Audrey Watters – writer @hackeducation (http://hackeducation.com ), ed-tech’s Cassandra, author of The Monsters of Education Technology.

Karen Blumberg – Do-gooder, NAIS Teacher of the Future, organizer (TEDx, EdCamp, RoboExpo), bargain shopper, traveler, and photographer living just enough for the city.

Angela Maiers – Speaker, Author, Educator. Founder @Choose2Matter. Driving the conversation on 21st century #leadership, #innovation, & digital media.

Organizations:

Hybrid Pedagogy – A Digital Journal of Learning, Teaching, and Technology / Critical Digital Pedagogy and New Media / Host of  Chat.

SmartBrief Education – Publishes and curates articles relevant to education.

FETC – FETC – Future of Education Technology Conference, a division of LRP Conferences, LLC, is one of the largest conferences in the U.S. devoted to .

ISTE – International Society for Technology Educators.

Huffington Post Education – An education news source and online hub for passionate voices.

Edutopia – Inspiration and information for what works in education.

Daily Genius – Helping teachers, students, parents, and everyone in education learn something new every day.

Products & Services:

EdTech K-12 Magazine – Ed Tech issues facing K–12 IT leaders, admins and educators.

Common Sense Educator – News, curricula, tips, and professional development for integrating technology in the classroom.

Google for Education – Helping prepare students to create the future. The best of Google, for education. Follow for product announcements, program updates and industry news.

Microsoft Education – Discovering, highlighting and enabling innovation and achievement among students, teachers and schools.

New York Times Learning Network – Teaching & Learning With The New York Times.

Education PD: Courses from Colleges of Education

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

iTunes U has published a collection of free, online courses on a variety of topics from several prominent Colleges of Education. These courses cover topics such as educational technology, student engagement, special education, and more.

You can access the whole list via this link.

Free iTunes U Resources on Digital Citizenship & Literacy

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

As Digital Citizenship & Literacy becomes more important in schools, it’s necessary for educators to become more familiar with the current best practices, legal requirements, and lesson plans. iTunes U (one of my favorite tools) offers a number of books, resources, and free digital classes to help you become more informed and to craft effective lesson plans and strategies to share in the classroom.

Resources include a variety of books from Common Sense Media, courses from Saint Ignatius High School and University of Britain, as well as in class apps and tools. You can find the whole list of resources here

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Leave Voice Comments in Google Docs with Kaizena

This is reblogged from my post on Daily Genius.

kaizena

I recently returned from the 2015 annual ISTE Conference in Philadelphia. It’s always exciting to learn about the new tools and features that are available to educators and students. One of my favorite tools on the market is Kaizena, a tool that you can use to give audio feedback to students in addition to coordinating your feedback with rubrics and learning tools. You can learn more about the advanced features of Kaizena, here. While at ISTE, I learned that Kaizena launched a new tool that will allow teachers to add voice comments far more easily and much faster! Kaizena has recently introduced their “Kaizena Mini” add-on that will allow you to leave voice comments and written notes on students’ documents within Google Docs itself. This way, you do not have to launch a third party tool to apply these features.

HOW TO LEAVE VOICE COMMENTS IN GOOGLE DOCS

AddOnsInstall Kaizena Mini Add-On

While inside of the document you would like to annotate with voice comments, simply go to Menu → Add-ons → Get Add-ons. When the Add-On window launches, simply search for “Kaizena.” Next, click on the “+ FREE” next to the Kaizena Mini Add-on, and follow the instructions to install the software on your account.

KaizenaOpen Kaizena Mini

With the software installed, simply go to Add-ons → Kaizena Mini → Open Kaizena Mini. This will launch the mini recorder on the right hand side. You should select that you are “giving feedback” and then choose the person receiving feedback from the menu (or add someone not listed), and then click continue. To leave feedback, highlight a portion of the text and click “+ New Feedback.” You can then select a voice comment, text comment, or even insert a link.

Leave voice omments

Once you have finished adding voice comments, the user will see the highlights on the document and be directed to open Kaizena Mini in order to hear the corresponding feedback. This is a great way to leave not just text but also audio feedback on student work while never having to leave Google Docs! Voice comments are a great way to provide in-depth and individualized feedback and, using the Kaizena mini recorder, you can do so faster than ever.

EdTechTeacher leads Google Workshops throughout the Summer and a few Google Jamborees during the School Year. However, you can always connect with us on twitter via #ettgoogle or learn more on ourGoogle Apps for Education Resources page.

How to create and collaborate (yes, really) online with Microsoft Excel

This is reblogged from my post on Daily Genius.

Office365-Excel-3

Until recently, in the world of online collaboration, Microsoft has been decidedly lacking. However, they have made impressive strides in online and cloud computing tools over the past year. For example, you can now easily create, edit, and collaborate on Excel spreadsheets and workbooks.

This can be accomplished using the new Office Online orOffice 365. It’s important to note that while Office Online is free, Office 365 is a paid resource ($99/year home and $69/year personal annual subscription; K-12 institutions have their own pricing tiers) and will give you greater access to resources, including free full-use of Mobile and Computer apps.

Microsoft recently extended its educational Microsoft Office license to include its online 365 service for free to schools. This means that if your school has a Microsoft license, you already have access to this tool. Just check with your IT administrative team to learn how to log on and access it.

Office365-Excel-1, EdTechTeacher

Navigating Office Online is a little different than the local tools on your computer. However, they are quick to figure out. To log in, go toOffice.com (if you have a free Microsoft account or Office 365 account) or go to login.live.com to create an account. Today, we’re going to explore Excel, so click on the Excel icon to get started.

EXCEL: MORE THAN A BASIC SPREADSHEET

A new window will open and, just like the desktop version, you will be given the option to access your recent workbooks or to create a new one using one of Excel’s workbook or spreadsheet templates. If you select a workbook that you have recently been working on, then you will need to click on Edit workbook → Edit in Excel Online (for collaborative features) or Edit in Excel (to open on your desktop for more advanced functionality).

Once you do this, you will have access to many of Excel’s robust tools. You can can format spreadsheets and columns, include complex functions, create charts and graphs, and more! With a school or paid-for subscription to Office 365, you even have unlimited storage for working with Excel online.

OOffice365-Excel-1, EdTechTeacherne of the best features of Office Online and Office 365, however, is something that you won’t find on the traditional Microsoft desktop tools (at least not yet): the ability to collaborate in real time with others! No more emailing a file back and forth, you can simply click the “share” icon and either share via email address with view or edit privileges or share with a link (again view or edit privileges).

If you share via a link with editing privileges, the other user does not even need an Office Online or Office 365 account! This is a great way to collaborate with others who don’t have access to Microsoft products.

All of your changes are saved automatically in the cloud, so it’s perfect for a Mobile environment where you’re always on the go. The workbook will be stored in yourOneDrive, so you can access it anywhere (online, app on your tablet or smartphone, or any computer)! The new Office Online tools extend Microsoft’s robust document editing tool to the web and is accessible from any device

COME COLLABORATE THIS SUMMER!

  • Workshop for That, EdTechTeacher Summer WorkshopsGoogle & Web Tools in the Student-Centered Classroom
  • The Chromebook Classroom
  • The iPad Classroom
  • And More!

View the Full Course Catalog at ettsummer.org

Featured image by Apollo Zeus via Flickr cc

How to bring visual learning into the classroom using infographics

This is reblogged from my post on Daily Genius.

Infographics are a powerful way to synthesize data and information, making it easy to conceptualize a message with a glance. For this reason, they are becoming a popular medium in marketing and presentations because they are visually engaging and simultaneously informative.

INFOGRAPHICS AS ASSESSMENT

VenngageThis year for the first time, I asked my students to create an Infographic as their culminating project for our study of the Civil Rights movement. I wanted them to give a presentation, but also wanted to move away from the traditional PowerPoints or poster sessions that they have done in the past. I liked the idea of them learning to present content effectively in a creative medium, and infographics are perfect for that. For this, I elected to use my favorite tool for creating professional looking infographics, Venngage.

Venngage offers many powerful and free resources that students can use to build professional looking infographics, and I really like how the tools are simple to use. I was even more excited when I learned that they recently introduced a great resource for teachers – Venngage Education – which allows you to create class accounts where students can use the Premium Features to create infographics and share them privately or with the class. The cost is much lower than their premium subscription, and if you have a short project, you can sign up for the free, 2 week trial, which gives you 35 student/teacher accounts.

VISUALS IN ACTION: HOW IT WORKED

In order for my students to build their Civil Rights infographics, I divided them into small groups and then gave each group a topic to cover: Civil Rights Groups, the fight for Hispanic Civil Rights, the March on Washington, School Integration, and Racial Clashes & Violence. I intentionally left the topics broad so that students could explore and develop the projects based on their research. Students delved into key figures, dates, statistics and data, and more. As this was their first-go round, I was excited with the results. Students were allowed to be creative while engaging in research and developing a visual presentation for a broader audience as shown by some of these great examples: Civil Rights Groups, Racial Clashes & Violence, and March on Washington.

LEARN MORE ABOUT ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENTS THIS SUMMER!

ETTsummer1

  • Google & Web Tools in the Student-Centered Classroom
  • Teaching History with Technology
  • Differentiating with Technology
  • And More!

View the Full Course Catalog at ettsummer.org

Office 365 on the Web & On Your Chromebook!

This is reblogged from my post on Daily Genius. A special thanks to Jonathan Wylie and his Office 365 and Office Online expertise! I strongly encourage you to check out his blog here for helpful hints, tricks, and ideas on how to integrate technology in your classroom or school.

Chromebooks have quickly become an incredibly popular tool in schools. However, this has previously limited users to only Google’s productivity tools. One of the most common complaints that I hear about Google Apps for Education tools (Gmail, Docs, Slides, etc), is that they are not as robust as those you find in the Microsoft Office Suite. Now, with the recent upgrades of Office Online and Office 365, it is possible navigate to the full Office suite using a Chromebook – or any other device! Office Online and Office 365 offer ais the new, web-based version of Microsoft toolsOffice and allows users to create and edit documents, presentations, spreadsheets, and more using only your browser. Another great feature of these toolsOffice 365 is that theyit allow you to collaborate with others (even if they don’t have a subscription). All of your Office 365 creations will be saved in your OneDrive account in the cloud, so no need to worry about saving it on your machine!

In order to use these new office tools, you will need to have either an Office 365 subscription ($99/year for a home and family edition) or sign up for a free Microsoft account at Office.com (note that if you have a hotmail account, those credentials will also work). An Office 365 subscription allows you to download the latest version of the software to your device as well as to use Mobile Apps for free. Recently, Microsoft extended its traditional educational license to include a subscription to Office 365 for Education. So if you have Office on your school computer, then you have the ability to create an Office 365 account and have access to more robust features in the Office 365 suite; speak to your IT manager to see what options may be available.

To access the Office Suite online, go to: login.microsoftonline.com and login with your person or school credentials (again, check with your IT manager). Once you are logged in, you will see the option to access all of your available Office tools and then select the tool that you want to use. If you are using an Office 365 Education account, much like with Google Apps, your administrator can determine which tools will be made available and which may not be turned on. As an example, in my domain, I cannot access Mail or Calendar because we use a different system and Sites and Tasks have been turned off completely. However, here are a few highlights of what is possible with Office 365 on any Chromebook or Computer.

Office 365 Start

MAIL

Not only can you now easily access your email via the web, there’s even aChrome app. Like Gmail, Outlook now threads conversations, keeping all messages and replies together. From the web, it is possible to read and reply to messages as well as to organize emails into folders. A particularly handy feature is the green “replied to” indicator to show when exactly you responded to a specific message.

CALENDARS

Much like with Google Calendars, through Office Online and Office 365 you can now also access any personal or shared calendars. Students can subscribe to class calendars and even create shared calendars for specific courses or groups. A really nice feature is the ability to view different calendars as tabs. This way, you can view everything or only the events on specific calendars. If your school uses a lot of shared calendars, then this could be extremely helpful for scheduling purposes.

Collaborating with Office Online and Office 365

A great, new feature of the Office Online tools in Office 365 is the ability to add collaborators to any Word, PowerPoint, or Excel file! Simply click the Share icon in the top right corner. A new window will pop up giving you the option to share with view or editing privileges. You can share by email or via a link (no need for a subscription)!

Once the document is shared, you can collaborate in real time, from any device (including your Chromebook)! All of the Office tools have robust online features and sharing capabilities. You can even collaborate on a PowerPoint Presentation, include the fancy transitions, and even present directly from the cloud!

Expanding Office beyond a hard drive and into the cloud gives Chromebook users greater options, more collaborative abilities, and access to a more robust suite of tools to expand their learning environment. Look for more information about these tools in coming posts.

COME COLLABORATE THIS SUMMER!

ETTsummer1

  • Google & Web Tools in the Student-Centered Classroom
  • The Chromebook Classroom
  • The iPad Classroom
  • And More!

View the Full Course Catalog at ettsummer.org