Tag Archives: Educational Resources

Ideas for using Peardeck & Google Drive in Your Classroom

This is reblogged from my post on FreeTech4Teachers

As more schools go 1:1, teachers often feel challenged to make their traditional lessons and activities more interactive. One of my favorite tools is Pear Deck because it allows a teacher to take a PowerPoint, Google Presentation, or PDF and incorporate various student activities to check for understanding and engagement. Pear Deck is free for students and teachers (with a higher end, paid premium model) and it fully integrates with Google Apps for Education.

When you sign in to your Pear Deck account, create a new interactive lesson by selecting “New Deck.” You can then create a slideshow from scratch or import a PowerPoint, Google Presentation, or PDF…

You can the complete article here.

How to enhance your lessons with Google Art Project

This is reblogged from my post on Daily Genius.

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Google Art Project is one of my favorite tools available online. It is a repository of high resolution images and 3D “museum view” virtual art gallery tours. Since its inception in 2011, Google Art Project has grown from its initial collaboration of 17 international museums to more than 151 and is now available in 18 languages.

This is a great tool for introducing students to Art from around the world. Here are a few ideas for lesson plans that you can use in conjunction with Google Art Project.

CREATE & CURATE A GALLERY

Google Art Project will allow you to create and curate your own gallery. You can have students build a project thematically (styles, emotional experiences, etc), chronologically, culturally, and more. Students select the pieces that they want to add to their gallery, move them around (just as a museum curators places art pieces in an exhibit), and then share them privately or publicly. This could be a great way for a student to showcase their understanding of a particular artist or style as a project for an Art History, History, Social Studies, or Humanities course.

COMPARE WORKS OF ART SIDE BY SIDE

Using the “Compare” model, you can put two works of art side by side and perform an in depth analysis of the works. Here is one of my favorite exercises:

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You will see that I have selected A Sunday on La Grande Jatte by Seurat (Chicago Institute of Art) andBreakfast by Signac (Kröller-Müller Museum); both of these artists were masters of pointillism. I have students examine the pieces in high definition, side-by-side, and explore the different techniques between these two artists.

Students write up their comparative analysis in their Art History notebook and present on the stylistic differences in class. This can also help students understand how styles and techniques evolve over time (Seurat and Signac developed pointillism out of the styles of impressionism). You can assign specific works of art to students (like I do above) or you can have students choose and compare pieces on their own.

This is a great way to teach students to engage the content in depth and perform comparative analysis.

STUDENTS STUDY & “FORGE” THE MASTERS

A common practice in Art courses is to study the work of master artists by reproducing their work. A fun way to do this is to ask students to “create a forgery.”

Students could select an artist and study their life, style, work, and technique; the high definition, zoomable figures on Google Art Project allows them to study numerous works of art that are held in collections around the world. After they have done this, ask them to create a fake!

They can host a gallery opening where visitors compare their reproduction to the original works of the artist.

PARTICIPATE IN AN ART TALK

Google hosts regular Hangouts on Air with prominent curators. They announce the schedule on theirGoogle+ page and post the recordings on theirYouTube page. Students can prepare for the announced topic and submit questions to professionals. It’s a great way to engage students with modern Art curation.

Google has also posted some different lesson ideashere. With more and more expansions to the Google Art Project (the most recent being its Street Art Collection), there will be more opportunities for students to explore the world of Art.

This resource continues to grow and provides students with the ability to explore art in new and interesting ways, outside of a textbook, or more in-depth than they could at a museum.

LEARN MORE ABOUT BRINGING GOOGLE INTO YOUR CLASSROOM!

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  • Google & Web Tools in the Student-Centered Classroom
  • Google & Chromebooks
  • The Chromebook Classroom
  • And More!

View the Full Course Catalog at ettsummer.org

10 Ways to Drive GAFE Adoption at your School

My next session is 10 Ways to Drive GAFE Adoption at your School by Peter Henrie of AmplifiedIT. I have done a little work with the guys at AmplifiedIT (they facilitated our adoption of Cloudlock), so I know I will get some great information from them. Peter tells us that his objective is for us to go back to our schools equipped with a few ideas of how to drive adoption of Google Apps at our schools.

1. Plan your school’s adoption: map out what, who, when where and Identify areas which would benefit from Google Tools. Set milestones, like going paperless or increase docs use by 50% by next semester.

2. When you reach milestones, celebrate them publicly. How do you know if people are using Google Apps or if you have hit your milestones, use the Reports Tab in the Control Panel. Here is a document that can help you navigate the reporting tools.

App Usage report in the Audit Log.

App Usage report in the Audit Log.

3. Help staff transform their current lessons with GAFE, not simply use the technology for technology sake. Focus on curriculum delivery, create champions of various tools, deliver key outcomes, and have department/subject specialization. I think this idea is especially important. Science teachers and History teachers have different needs, as do elementary and high school teachers.

4. Explore external/online training solutions like Synergyse Google Apps Training. These tools (often paid) can allow people to train on their own schedule and on their own topics. Its reporting tools give you up to date information on who has completed professional development. As these tools only focus on PD, so their content is always up to date.

5. Create & Publicize Templates. Templates are kind of hidden away, so you will need to direct people to them. You can create templates for things like course websites, forms, agendas, etc. Teachers can create and add their own templates, which is a great way to sure lessons and other tools. You can learn how to create and submit a template here.

6. Get people to use other services in GAFE: Calendar, Groups, Sites, and Drive. To get people to use these tools, create resources in them. For example, if you want them to use Calendar create a  Test Calendar or a Resources Calendar. For Groups, you can create discussion groups. For sites, use them for course websites or digital portfolios. Drive is a great way to have people share robust files that are too large for email (video).

Screen Shot 2015-04-09 at 12.03.39 PM7. Browse the EDU sections of Chrome Webstore and Google Apps Marketplaces. The Chrome Webstore allows you to add extension or add-ons to Chrome and has an education extension. The benefit of using these add-ons is that you can not only access a myriad of tools (paid and free) and automatically have single sign-on. The Google Apps Marektplace is a feature that your administrator will need to enable and tends to include more robust tools that are often tied to third party tools (like an LMS).

8. Remove Obstacles: Don’t make it hard for people to use these tools. Make sure that GAFE is configured correctly, create a browser policy (to facilitate Chrome adoption), delegate admin rights, and use Groups for easy sharing.

9. Create a Teacher Dashboard. Peter recommends Hapara. If the cost is prohibitive, try Google Classroom (which has fewer functions). The dashboard makes GAFE more usable and easier to navigate.

10. Lead by Example: Model effective integration of GAFE by using Google Docs, default to Chrome, and practicing what you preach. If you draft the minutes of a faculty meeting on a Google doc and share it out with faculty to revise or view, then it not only forces them to log in to that Google Doc, but demonstrates application and learning.

AmplifiedIT has also drafted a couple of ebooks on Google Apps adoption: 14 Ways to Increase Google Apps Adoption at your School and 9 Expert Pieces of Advice for Adopting Google Apps for Education at Your School.

Primary Source Materials for Your iPad

Primary sources are vital resources for educators. iTunes has collected various primary sources, including: historic film, documents, and oral histories. Many of their posted resources are free! Check it out here.

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iTunes Resources for Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month and here is a great repository of resources via iTunes. You will find iTunes U courses, podcasts, books, apps, and more.

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Man vs. the Machine: Google Translate

I’m a huge fan of Google Translate as it can come in handy in a pinch. However, how effective is it against a “real life translator?” Here’s a great infographic from Verbalink that highlights just that!

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Free Art History Education in your Inbox

Artips is a free daily newsletter focused on art history. Delivered to subscribers’ inbox 3 times a week, Artips tells short and original stories about famous and unknown works of art.

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Founded in April 2013, Artips is a start-up founded by two young college graduates, Coline Debayle and Jean Perret. They decided to create a way to address difficulties many individuals face when trying to understand the arts, such as the art world’s complex nature, outdated art history texts and long lines outside major museums across the world.

Artips makes art history more accessible and mobile by offering daily enter- taining and unique stories that take only a minute to read. With its advanced and responsive design, Artips can be read on a smartphone, tablet or computer.

As an Artips subscriber, you will learn the answers to the following questions: Why did Michelangelo sign his Pietà like a thief in the night? Why does the barmaid of Folies- Bergères look so melancholy in Manet’s painting? What were the eerie premonitions of Surrealists like Dali or Brauner? From ancient to contemporary art, Artips allows us to understand works of art from a new angle.

Through the writings of over one hundred specialists, editors, students, art hobbyists and art history teachers, Artips tells a memorable and fun story every day about paintings, sculptures, installations, photography and design.

As of this month, there are over 80,000 francophone subscribers and we have launched our English version earlier this month.

To subscribe to Artips for free, visit their website artips.co.