Flipped Professional Development

The last session for the day I am attending is the Flipped Professional Development by Ryan Eash of TechSmith. You can check out his slides here.

He shared with us a brief video, highlighting a Flipped Professional Development Model:

It discusses the issue that is prevalent in Ed Tech PD – that people are on very different levels and scales. This format (the flipped model) allowed for multiple EdTech teachers to accommodate different needs and levels. It was a popular method among the faculty as it allowed for greater flexibility and leveling.

In order to make a model like this work, you need to have enough instructional technology administrators to effectively provide support for your full staff.

VIa brookscl and Flickr

Via brookscl and Flickr

We talk about the good and bad of professional development practices: not having a supportive infrastructure and lack of directionality (how do I put this in my classroom?) led to the worst experiences, the best were hands on and building lessons.

“What is the best use of classroom time with your students?” – Jon Bergmann and Aaron Sams

Conversely, what is the best use of your teacher’s time? Ryan highlights these key elements for effective PD:

  • Focus on classroom application
  • Choices
  • Utilize “experts” in your buildings
  • Move at your own pace
  • Learn by doing
  • Ongoing support and help from peers

“So what does Flipped Professional Development look like at your school?” This element requires a lot of consideration: how much time will people need to complete it? How do you get individuals to participate? Is it a multiple application process?

“How does video help with PD?”

  • Create videos for teachers to watch ahead of time, use PD to learn by doing
  • Use video to provide follow-up resources to answer questions or share more ideas.
  • Provide a video of information & share Google Doc for collaboration
  • Flip your staff meetings!

He next moved to the demonstration using Snagit, a sophisticated screen capturing tool. It allows you to create really powerful still and video captures. If you want to learn more about Snagit, check out their tutorials page and/or this introductory video:

Ryan quickly showed us some of the basic features of Snagit, creating a video right in front of us. A feature I really like is that it readily integrates with Google Drive, Evernote, OneNote, YouTube, and Screencast.com. The Google Drive integration allows you to put it directly into a folder (e.g. a shared class folder) as well as providing you the URL to share.He also showed us Camtasia, which is far more robust and allows for advanced editing.

Another great possibility that Ryan suggest is using students to help teach concepts. If you would like to see it in action, check out TechSherpas.org and attend one of their weekly shows.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Flipped Professional Development

  1. Pingback: Flipped Professional Development | BYOD iPads |...

  2. Pingback: Kdbostain | Pearltrees

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s