Category Archives: Archaeology

Google Arts & Culture for Android & iOS

google-arts-cultureI have long been a fan of Google Arts & Culture (previously Google Art Project). It allows individuals to explore museums, exhibits, and historical topics around the world. For example, you can tour the works of Vincent Vangogh, explore Ancient Kyoto, or wander around the Lincoln Home (to name a few).

Previously, the robust features of Google Arts & Culture was reserved for computers. Now, however, you can download the free pap for your iOS or Android device. This is a great way to let students explore the different tools and features available via Google Arts & Culture on your classroom tablets or even on student smartphones!

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Free Technology for Teachers: Explore the World with the Google Cultural Institute

This is reblogged from my post on Free Technology for Teachers

I am a big fan of the Google Cultural Institute; it’s an amazing repository of Artistic Masterpieces, Wonders of the Natural World, Historical Artifacts, and more. By using it as a repository of digital materials, it’s an easy way to access cultural content from around the world in my classroom. I can pull up a high definition image of Van Gogh’s Starry Night and use its powerful zoom features so that students can see the impasto brush strokes. We can explore the Street Art of Sao Paulo with a Google Street View for a unit on modern art or the Ruins at Angkor Wat

Free Technology for Teachers: Explore the World with the Google Cultural Institute.

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Explore the Pyramids on Google Maps

Google Maps now offers street views of the monuments of Egypt, including panoramas and street view access of the Pyramids.

This an addition to Google’s “Treks,” which includes streetview access of the world’s natural and man-made wonders, including Mt. Everest, the Grand Canyon,  the Eiffel Tower, and more.

 

National Archives Making Thousands of Images Available via Wikimedia Commons

Adams_Boulder_Dam_1942The National Archives has uploaded thousands of images to Wikimedia Commons, making them available free of charge to the general public. 

“By uploading digital content there, we make it readily available for Wikipedia editors to embed in Wikipedia articles, making them far more visible than they are in our own catalog,” said Dominic McDevitt-Parks, digital content specialist and Wikipedian in Residence at NARA.

They intend to make thousands of more images available in the near future. You can read more about their collaboration here

Creative Commons and Cultural Heritage

These are some great thoughts about presenting cultural documents and artifacts to the public and how they should be licensed. Interesting ethical questions and dialogue.

Archaeology, Museums & Outreach

Java PrintingI am very pleased to present a post and resource links on Creative Commons by my colleague Jason Baird Jackson.  More and more cultural heritage professionals and students are faced with questions about how to best present original documents for public access and the proper citation and use of internet files.  Jason provides a solid introduction and valuable links to Creative Commons licenses that are relevant today and will be increasingly important in the immediate future.

Creative Commons and Cultural Heritage

by Jason Baird Jackson

Do public archaeologists, heritage professionals, museum practitioners, and graduate students need to know about the Creative Commons? I think so. Robert Connolly does so as well, which is why he thought to ask me to contribute a short note to his blog. After you have learned a bit about it, I hope that you too will see the relevance of the tools provided by the…

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Walk the Ocean Floor with Google Maps Street View

In a project sponsored by Google and Catlin Seaview Survey, Google Maps now offers “Street View” of the Ocean Floor. A majority of the images have been collected off the coast of Australia and the Caribbean. Scientists in America will be exploring fish-eye under water photography this week in the Florida Keys. 

You can read more about the project via the Associated Press or this summary by Scientific American. You can peruse the collection of underwater Street View images (with more coming) here.

 

The Underwater Museum of Isla Mujeres, Mexico Courtesy of Google Maps

The Underwater Museum of Isla Mujeres, Mexico
Courtesy of Google Maps

Smarty Pins – Google Maps, geography trivia, and video games

Some great ways to use Google in the History Classroom!

History Tech

Google Maps. Geography trivia. And video games. Three of my favorite things. And now, they’re all together in one place.

Google’s new Smarty Pins. (Get it? Smarty Pants – Smarty Pins? You nutty Google engineers!)

Smarty Pins is basically a simple trivia game that asks questions with geo-tagged answers using the Google Maps interface.

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