Category Archives: Black History

Free Technology for Teachers: Explore the World with the Google Cultural Institute

This is reblogged from my post on Free Technology for Teachers

I am a big fan of the Google Cultural Institute; it’s an amazing repository of Artistic Masterpieces, Wonders of the Natural World, Historical Artifacts, and more. By using it as a repository of digital materials, it’s an easy way to access cultural content from around the world in my classroom. I can pull up a high definition image of Van Gogh’s Starry Night and use its powerful zoom features so that students can see the impasto brush strokes. We can explore the Street Art of Sao Paulo with a Google Street View for a unit on modern art or the Ruins at Angkor Wat

Free Technology for Teachers: Explore the World with the Google Cultural Institute.

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Library of Congress Online Exhibit – African American History Month

Carter G. Woodson, historian and founder of Black History Month in America; courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Carter G. Woodson, historian and founder of Black History Month in America; courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

If your’e looking for resources for Black History Month, the Library of Congress has published an extensive online repository “African American History Month.” It focuses on the history of African Americans in popular culture, sports, politics, Civil Rights, art, and more.

You can view written documents, images, audio collections, and video as it pertains to different areas of study and focus. To access content, simply visit here.

Smithsonian Online Exhibit: Separate is *not* Equal

ATM-Object-Greensboro-Woolworth-lunch-counter-631February is Black History Month and the National Museum of American History is marking the event with its online exhibit: Stories of Freedom & Justice. As this year marks the 50th anniversary of the Greensboro, NC Woolworth sit-in, the event has taken a special place at the Smithsonian.

The online exhibit includes numerous stories, first hand accounts, and images from that fateful event in which four young African-American college students sat at a “white’s only” lunch counter and refused to move, sparking a six month movement that would ultimately pave the way for Civil Rights in the state of North Carolina.

To learn more about the Civil Rights movement in America, to see more images and/or videos, and to access teaching resources, see the online exhibit.