Tag Archives: Copyright

Getty Museum Adds Another 77,000 Images to its Open Content Archive – Open Culture

Open Culture has announced that the Getty Museum has published an additional 77,000 images to its Open Content Archive! The Getty Museum’s Open Content Archive is a

Digital image courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program

Bust of the Emperor Commodus. Digital image courtesy of the Getty’s Open Content Program

repository of images that the museum has placed in the Public Domain.

More than 87,000 high resolution images are now available via the Getty’s Open Content Archive. To learn more about this project and other resources available to the public, see the article by Open Content Archive:

Getty Museum Adds Another 77,000 Images to its Open Content Archive – Open Culture.

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Infographic on Creative Commons – What Can You Use? How do You Cite?

Digital Literacy includes obeying copyright and fair use laws. I’ve written about this in my article, “How to Find License Free Content for School Projects” and it has been highlighted by Edutopia in “Copyright and Fair Use For Educators.”

I recently came across a great infographic that highlights how to use and credit creative commons licensed content by foter.com. You can check it out below!

CC-infographic

Copyright and Fair Use for Educators

One of the key components of Digital Literacy is understanding the concept of copyright (protected physical and intellectual material) and Fair Use (limited exceptions granted to educational environments). This is a notoriously gray area in the online world. I addressed this concept in my article, “How to Find License Free Content for School Projects.” Additionally, I try to build digital literacy (including copyright issues) into my broader instructional framework. You can see an example of this in my recent article, “Student Documentaries in History Class.”

Edutopia addresses this issue in their 5 minute video collection, “Copyright and Faire Use for Educators.” This assemblage addresses concerns across grade levels and subject matter. If you would like to see an example of one of these videos, checkout Copyright on Campus’ video below:

To learn more, be sure to visit Edutopia!

Google Docs & Research: How-To?

Google Research Pane

Google Research Pane

The last session I am attending is “Google Docs & Research: How-To?” given by Christopher Craft, Ph.D. As I am using Google Drive with my students for an upcoming research project, I’m excited to learn more about the tools available here.

When students are doing research, they sometimes struggle with citing their sources or moving beyond a quick search with Google.com. The Google Docs Research Pane helps to facilitate searching for and citing sources. By going to Tools –> Research, the Research Pane pops up on the right hand side! You can search Google, images, scholar, quotes, and dictionary! By dragging and dropping certain content (e.g. images), not only will the material appear, but a footnote (in MLA, Chicago, or APA format).

Google Image Usage Rights

Google Image Usage Rights

A great element in using the Google Image search is that, when teaching students about copyright and usage rights, you can limit the Google Image search to “free to use or share.” This is key for work that is going to be published online. I highlight the need to address licensing in student projects in my article: “How to Find License Free Content for School Projects.”

Remember that this tool is not perfect. Students may need to fix formatting or bibliography. For example, if you do not want students using footnotes, they will have to revise the document to remove the footnotes and use in text citation. For my students, they would need to revise image citations for full content, such as for a work of art.

Another great tool for sophisticated research is Google Scholar. It is both a stand alone feature as well as a search option on the pane. You can look up academic content and, so long as you have access rights (e.g. via Jstor) you can read and include the citation properly. If you have not yet played with Google Scholar, it’s worth a look. Here’s a good introductory video (it’s 40 minutes so grab a snack!).

Screen Shot 2013-10-20 at 3.26.03 PM

Insert Quote

You can also search and input quotes! Not only can you find relevant quotes, but then it will put it in the document and then cite it. Again, it will cite as a website, so if you would like your students to format differently, then be sure to have students revise and edit!

These features also work on a shared format as well. This means that if you have a group of students working on a research project, you can see who added what and when. So is one student doing all the work and the others slacking off? Is Joseph doing research on Jstor but Stephanie is spending all of her time on Wikipedia? I like that this not only lets me see the amount of material students are contributing, but the quality of that research.

Screen Shot 2013-10-20 at 3.37.22 PMAnother key feature is that by looking at the revision history, you can look for plagiarism. Using revision history, see if students are adding in chunks of texts or individual words. Using your own judgment, you can then select a section of text and do a quick search. If students create a bunch of citations at one time, then you may want to pull that student aside and ask them how they incorporated their research (Did they carefully revise and add footnotes as they went?) to see if that meshes with how the citation appears in the document. This is also a great tool when you consider  the “document translation” feature. If all content was added at once, the student didn’t translate, they used the tool to do it for them.

There are a few draw backs to using the research pane. For example, there is not a way to seamlessly integrate outside research. If students are using books in your library in addition to web resources, they cannot easily include that in the research pane. Google Books is not currently integrated in the research pane either. They will have to manually input content and material.

5 Myths and Facts about Copyright and Images Online

I posted an article a few months ago entitled, “How to find License Free Material for School Projects.” I highlighted several resources educators and students can use to find License Free, non-comercial,  retired license, public domain or creative commons license content.

I recently came across a great info-graphic, “5 Myths & Facts about Copyright & Images Online.” It highlights the popular myths and possible legal consequences of using online images that isn’t licensed accordingly. Image is reproduced with permission from Legal123.au.com

++ Click Image to Enlarge ++
Internet Copyright Infringement
Source: Copyright Infringement: Myths vs Facts

Creative Commons Resources for Classroom Teachers | CTQ

A few months ago, I wrote an article “How to Find License Free Content for Classroom Projects.” Issues surrounding copyright, plagiarism, and online resources are becoming more important as our schools become more digital. Check out this great article by the Center for Teaching Quality, that highlights how to find Creative Commons Resources:

Creative Commons Resources for Classroom Teachers | CTQ.

Excellent Resources for Public Domain Pictures

wikimediacommonsI posted a few months ago some suggestions to help students and teachers “Find License Free Content for Schools.”Educational Technology and Mobile Learning has added some additional resources. Check out their list at “7 Excellent Resources for Public Domain Pictures.” Some cross post with my list, others are new. Great tools for teaching kids about Public Domain, Copyright, Creative Commons, and other forms of digital literacy.