Tag Archives: google forms

How to Create a Self-Graded Quiz in Google Forms

The new Google Forms allows you to create self-grading quizzes right within the form (no need for an add-on!). This is a great way to create bell-ringers, exit tickets, or quick assessments. Creating a self-graded form is easy! screen-shot-2016-09-27-at-1-37-25-pm

First, create a new Google Form and give it a title. Next enter your questions (for auto-grading, they will need to be in the form of multiple-choice, check boxes, or drop-down. Once you have created your quiz, click on the settings button (the gear shaped icon in the top right). Select the “Quizzes” tab and toggle on “Make this a Quiz.”

Next you can select when students will see their scores and if they can answers they left blank.

screen-shot-2016-09-27-at-1-37-38-pmNext, you will need to set your answer key. At the bottom of questions you have already created or new ones that you create, there will be a blue “Answer Key.” Click on this button. You will then select the right answer(s) that will be used as the key. You can also set the number of points each question is worth.

Once you have set all of your answers and point values, the quiz is ready to go! You can share with students via email, link, or even QR code!

5 Uses for Google Forms in Schools

Over the last year, Google has showered Forms with a lot of attention and, as a result, has enjoyed numerous, productive updates for educators. I use Google Forms regularly in my school and now more than ever, it’s become instrumental for both my academic as well as administrative duties. Here are five ways that you can use Google Forms in your school.

Bell Ringer/Exit Ticket

I’m a fan of bell ringers and exit tickets. Bell ringers are a great tool to check for understanding and to get my students in the mind-set of the class. Exit tickets are a great way to check for understanding at the end of a lesson. With Forms, you can post an assignment for students to complete when they walk in the door or a quick quiz to assess them at the end of a lesson. If your students are in a 1:1 environment, you can email the form to them. You can also distribute the form with a shortened URL (using a tool like Google’s URL shortener, goog.gl) or even post a QR code for students to scan with their smart phones. New Forms now includes a “quiz” options so that students can be assessed once they hit “submit.” To activate this feature, click on settings (the gear icon) and select the “quiz” option. You can then select whether or not students get feedback right away, what answers they see, and more.

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Collect Emergency Contact Information

If you take field trips or want to keep an emergency packet, Google Forms can be a great way to collect emergency contact information from parents and guardians. Simply create a Google Form that asks for names, phone numbers, and email addresses. As Google Forms collects this data into an aggregated spreadsheet, you have access to all of the information in one place. If you have teaching assistants, parent volunteers, or chaperones, you can share out this information using “view only” mode in preparation for field trips or emergency planning.  A nice feature here is that phone numbers collected in spreadsheets serve as a “hot-link” on phones; click the number and it will auto-dial!

Collecting Feedback

Feedback is an important tool for both students and teachers. If you are trying out a new lesson or project, wanting to hear how students feel they are learning, or otherwise collect feedback, Google Forms is a great way to do this. Using Forms, you can make the feedback anonymous or collect user data, give open ended options or scale responses to a list or a grid. I periodically collect feedback just to take the pulse of my classroom and to improve on my teaching methods.

Sign up for Project Topics

Screen Shot 2016-08-22 at 10.30.11 AMI love to make students teach in my class! Often, I will break down a large subject into various, smaller topics. Using Google Forms and the add-on Choice Eliminator, I can not only ensure that my students sign up for a project, but that they each select a unique topic. To use this feature, be sure that you have the add on Choice Eliminator (you can access it in the Chrome Web Store). Choice Eliminator will remove question options (check box and multiple choice) once a user has selected it. To access your add-ons, click on the Add-On button (it looks like a puzzle piece) and select “Choice Eliminator.” Select “configure” and then choose the questions you want use Choice Eliminator on. If you need a little extra help, check out the Choice Eliminator tutorial below.

Volunteer sign up

Do you need to find volunteers for prom, to count votes for an election, or chaperone the class volunteer trip? Google Forms is a way to collect volunteer information, have them sign up for shifts, or indicate that they can volunteer to carpool. The flexibility of Forms and add-ons make it a great tool to wrangle in your volunteers. For example, if Prom is a particularly popular volunteer activity, you can use the add-on formLimiter to stop accepting sign-ups after you have hit your maximum. If you want to divide the form into shifts, you can combine formLimiter and Choice Eliminator. The flexibility of Google Forms make this a great tool for wrangling your volunteers, collecting contact information, and organizing them effectively.

Google Forms is one of the most flexible tools within the Google platform. Not only is it useful as a classroom tool, but for administrative tasks as well. These are only five options, however I encourage you to play with this and find ways that it can make your life easier. Post your suggestions below!

5 New Google Form Features

This is reblogged from my post on Daily Genius.

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If you have opened Google Forms lately, you’ve probably noticed that things are looking a little different! Don’t worry, this Google Forms does everything the older version did… agoogle formsnd a few more cool things! If you get a little annoyed with it, you can always go back to the old version. Just click the little the man in the bottom left corner and you will be back in your familiar territory. However, if you’re feeling creative, check out the new tools! Here are five of my favorites!

See Responses, Live!google forms

One of the new features of is that you can view responses as they come in. Select the “response” tab and view a summary of the results or click on “individual” to see how individuals have responded to specific questions. This is a great way to keep tabs on your survey as it runs.

Insert video/image

Ygoogle formsou can now insert images and YouTube videos directly into your survey questions. This is great if you want to have students watch a video and check for understanding or to make a quick demo of a tool you want input on. On the right hand side, select either the “image” button or the “YouTube icon” to add your content into the your Google Form.

Multiple Choice Grids

A new question type has been added, “Multiple Choice Grids.” This allows users to rank a series of questions. For example, if you want to rank a series of new technology features, you can set up a Multiple Choice Grid with the features in rows and rankings in columns. Even better, survey takers cannot select the same column twice. See below:

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Publish with pre-filled responses

google formsA new feature for Google Forms is that you can publish a version of your form with pre-filled responses. This is a great tool if you need to do a “run-off” of one part of your Google Form. To do this, select the three dot menu in the top right and then click on “Get pre-filled link.” A new window will open where you select the answers you want to pre-filled. Pre-fill your select answers and click “submit.” Google will then post a new link for you to share out with your pre-filled form.

Insert add-ons

google formsWith the new Google Forms has come a whole series of new add-ons! To include an add-on, click on the three-dot menu in the top right and select Add-ons (the icon looks like a puzzle piece). Browse through the available add-ons to include in your form. One of my favorites is “Form Limiter” that will close a form once a maximum number of responses have been accepted. Another is “Choice Eliminator.” I use this tool when I want to allow students to select on topic from a list with no duplicate topics. Math and Science teachers, check out g(Math) Forms; using this tool you can insert complex equations into your forms.
The new Google Forms brings with it a lot of promise for further advancement and greater usability. Play with these new tools and try out a few others!

An Administrator’s Guide to Google Forms

This is reblogged from my post on Daily Genius.

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The Google Apps for Education suite includes a number of robust tools that can streamline administrative tasks. In addition to making your job as an administrator easier, using them allows you to model effective technology adoption with your staff. One of my favorite tools to tackle this type of tasks isGoogle Forms, one of tools within Google Drive. Here are five ways that Administrators can use Google Forms in their schools.

Google Forms for Classroom Observations

Classroom observations are a key tool for evaluating faculty and providing them valuable feedback. One way to make providing feedback faster and easier is to turn your classroom observation forms into Google Forms. Having the form in an electronic, interactive format will make the process less cumbersome and store the data digitally for future access. If you have a tablet or smartphone, you can complete the form easily from your portable device. Also, by using a Google Form, you can quickly email the contents to faculty, department chairs, and HR. Here is an example form for observation.

Faculty Sign Ups for Events

If you need chaperones for a school dance or field trip, lunch duty, or even detention, Google Forms is a simple way to have faculty and staff respond and sign up. You can easily share a form via email or post it on your school’s website. With the new Google Forms Add-Ons, you can limit responses by automatically turning off the form when you reach maximum participation, set up notifications when someone completes a form, and export the results to a shareable Google Doc when you need to dispense information to others (such as chaperone contact information or time slot sign-ups for an event).

Collect Info from Parents

When you schedule field trips or other activities, you often want to collect parental contact information in the event of an emergency. You can easily collect information such as phone numbers, email addresses, and emergency contacts using a Google Form. Because the information automatically aggregates into aGoogle Sheet, you can then share this information with chaperones and sponsors. As it can be accessed digitally, a chaperone can easily access the spreadsheet with their smart phone and contact the appropriate individual wherever they are.

Schedule Meeting Times

Everyone in a school has a busy schedule and finding a time to meet can be a challenging endeavor. You can send out a Google Form for people to indicate their availability. To do this, create a form, use the “checkbox” question option, and list available dates and times. Individuals can select all of the dates and times they are available to meet.

After all of your participants have responded, you can easily view the responses as a spreadsheet. To more easily visualize the results, select Form → Summary of Responses to pull up a visual graph

Summary of Responses Graph

Survey Your Community

Google Forms is a quick and easy way to survey your community both formally and informally. Many schools survey their faculty, students, and parents on topics ranging from experiences at the school, health and wellness, professional development, communication, and more. With Google Forms, you can easily create and distribute surveys, collect the data in a Google Sheet, and share it with appropriate personnel to analyze and assess.

These are five simple ways that administrators can employ Google Forms to facilitate their role as well as model technology use at school. For even more ideas, you may also want to read this article or watch Leading Change in a 1:1 Classroom.

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5 Ways School Administrators Can Use Google Apps

This is reblogged from my post on Daily Genius.

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One of the most powerful ways that administrators can encourage their faculty to adopt new technologies in their classroom and curriculum is by modeling effective application of new digital tools. With Google Apps for Education, there are many tools that are helpful for administrative tasks, providing a number of ways to effectively model technology usage on a daily basis.

CREATE A SHARED GOOGLE DOC FOR FACULTY MEETINGS

Use Google Docs to create and share meeting agendas. Not only will it prep your faculty for meetings, but they can use the document to keep shared, electronic notes; this is especially useful if you have a designated individual to keep minutes. You can include live links for content, embed materials, create & share calendar events, etc. These are not possible in a static, paper document and not only demonstrate your commitment to adopting new technologies, but also help spark the imaginations of your teachers in applying these new tools in their own classrooms.

USE A GOOGLE FORM FOR CLASSROOM OBSERVATIONS

If you visit and observe classes, then turn your classroom observation forms into Google Forms. Having an electronic form will save you time and space. If you have a tablet or smartphone, you can complete the form easily on a portable device. Also, by using a Google Form, you can quickly email the contents to faculty, department chairs, and HR. Here is an example form for observation.

USE GOOGLE FORMS FOR SIGN-UPS

If you need chaperones for a school dance or field trip, lunch duty, or detention, Google Forms is a simple way to have faculty and staff respond. You can easily share a form via email or post it on your school’s website. With the new Google Forms Add-Ons, you can limit responses by automatically turning off the form when you reach maximum participation, set up notifications when faculty respond, and export it to a shareable Google Doc when you need to share information (such as chaperone contact information or time slot sign-ups for an event).

USE GOOGLE CALENDAR’S “APPOINTMENTS SLOTS” FOR MEETINGS

One of my favorite features in Google Calendar is setting up “Appointment Slots.” Keeping an “open door” can be tricky; it’s difficult to get your work done when you are regularly interrupted. Posting your calendar can also be problematic as even if you have nothing scheduled, you may want that time reserved for administrative work, phone calls, or lunch! With appointment slots, you can designate certain times you are available for meetings. This is a great way to have your faculty sign up for face-to-face time with you as well as keep you organized.

If you would like a step-by-step tutorial, check out this great video by The Gooru.

 

COLLECT IMAGES & VIDEOS VIA A SHARED FOLDER

Schools often struggle collecting images of field trips, school plays, and other activities. If you would like to facilitate this process, then share a folder with the community that they can use to upload videos and photos. When you designate a shared folder, be sure to explore the various options available to you and apply them appropriately. You may want to share the folder only with the certain teachers and students, the whole school, or the broader community like parents and alumni. The flexible sharing options make it easy to individualize. What makes Google Folders such a great way to collect materials is the fact that most people use their phone as their camera. With the free Google Drive App for Android or iOS, they can upload directly from their device.

Google Apps is a flexible and robust tool that can facilitate not only teaching, but also administrative duties. Additionally, by modeling effective use of technology with your own administrative tasks for your faculty, you familiarize them with available tools and encourage them to apply them in their own classrooms.

For an opportunity to learn more about using Google Apps for Education, join EdTechTeacher and Google for the firstEdTechTeacher Google Jamboree. Registration is FREE! The deadline to apply is January 7th.

5 Time Saving Ways Teachers can use Google Forms

This is reblogged from my original post at Edudemic. It is part of my Google Drive series which includes “10 Things Every Teacher Should be able to do on Google Docs.”

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One of my favorite features of Google Drive is Google Forms. If you’re unfamiliar with this, think of it as a way to create quick surveys that can be used for a number of applications. Google automatically aggregates this data into a Google Spreadsheet, making forms a great way to quickly collect and share information. I have seen educators and administrators use Google Forms in the most creative and inventive ways. If you’re just starting with Google Forms, here are five ways that you can use them to streamline your classroom!

Collect Contact Information

At the beginning of the year, I find that a great ice-breaker with my students is to share a Google Form that asks their name, contact information, and something unique and interesting about themselves. Not only do I get pertinent information (like which email they check), but I also learn a little bit more about my them.

Similarly, it is often necessary to collect information from parents for special events. For example, if you are taking a field trip with your class, a Google Form is a quick and easy way to collect emergency contact information from parents/guardians. Again, the information is gathered into a Google Sheet so you don’t have to spend time entering data later and you can electronically store and share the information with other chaperones – no more clipboards or manila envelopes!

Bell Ringer & Exit Ticket Activities

Google Forms are a great medium to engage students in bell ringer and exit ticket activities (a means to gauge what a student has learned at the end of a lesson). With a bell ringer via a Google Form, students have something to engage with right away when they enter your classroom. Some teachers elect to create a simple check-in (how are you feeling this morning?) or a reflection on the previous night’s homework. Likewise, if you want students to check in before leaving class with an exit ticket, a Google Form is a great way to check for understanding. You can ask key and reflective questions about the topics you covered that day. If you build your form as fill-in-the-blank or multiple choice, you can even use a tool called Flubaroo to automatically mark it!

Collect Homework

Collecting homework is often an onerous task. Google Forms can help to organize the process. If students are answering exploratory questions, they can do this via a form that you create so that you have all of their responses timestamped and in one place. Even better, if students are working on projects that they post online (a blog post, a video, an audio recording) then a Google Form can allow you to collect the web links to their completed work. This is a great way to organize creative projects that can otherwise be cumbersome to track.

Survey & Check-In with Students

Touching base with students on a regular basis is crucial but can be difficult to do. Google Forms provide a great medium for you to check in with your classes and get individual responses. “How is the pace of the course?” “What has been your favorite lesson and why?” Using a check-in system regularly allows students to feel that you are invested in them and their education; it also provides a safe place for them to leave meaningful feedback such as what elements of the course are challenging, how they interact with their peers, and best ways to engage them in learning.

Creating Rubrics

Google Forms can also be used to create rubrics for assignments, speeding up your grading and allowing for consistent feedback. Again, because the data aggregates into a spreadsheet, it’s easy to transfer that information directly into your gradebook. Here is a great video from the Google Guru that shows you how to set up a grading rubric:

There are a lot of great things that you can do with Google Forms, and this is just a quick and simple list. Play with Google Forms to figure out new and interesting ways that you can employ them in your classroom and at your institution. To get started, check out this video tutorial from EdTechTeacher.

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